Nov 28, 2022  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Social Work

  
  •  

    MSSW 602 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment 2


    This course continues the systems theory and person-in-environment framework introduced in HBSE I. It explores the structure of organizations, groups, and communities as they provide social contexts for human development beyond the family group. This course gives attention to the demographic profile of communities and issues surrounding access to services.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 603 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment 3


    This advanced course continues the study of human behavior with emphasis on the behavioral and psychological difficulties people experience in interacting with their environments. The biological, sociological, and intrapsychic theories of mental illness and treatment based on these theories are reviewed in depth. The course includes an examination of the use of the DSM V, and the impact of diversity and oppression in the etiology, epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of mental illness.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 604 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment 4


    This course provides advanced standing MSW students with an opportunity to learn and apply contemporary theories of human behavior which provide the foundation for advanced generalist social work practice. These theories include psychological theories, postmodern, systems theory and other theories of human behavior and the social environment that are considered essential in advanced generalist social work practice but which are not generally covered in depth in BSW programs. The course is highly interactive and includes guest presentations, small group discussions, and application of theory in cases selected by both students and the instructor(s).

    Credits: 2








  
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    MSSW 610 - Social Work Practice 5


    This course is a bridge course between foundational and concentration levels for advanced standing students. The course will include generalist practice perspectives, teach skills relating to those perspectives, and introduce current practice trends in major fields of social work, including the changes in practice resulting from multiculturalism, globalization, managed care, and welfare reform. Particular emphasis is placed on the generalist practitioner’s ability to move from large, community system interventions to organizational interventions to direct practice with families and individuals.

    Credits: 2








  
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    MSSW 611 - Social Welfare Policy 1


    This course, a basic introduction to American social welfare policy, first examines the history of the American response to need with particular emphasis upon the role of the social work profession. After providing this historical framework, it assesses major contemporary governmental and non-governmental initiatives to fulfill human need, emphasizing a breadth of social policy issues, such as poverty, discrimination, health care, housing, food, child welfare, substance abuse, employment, and social service delivery.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 612 - Social Welfare Policy 2


    This course emphasizes a social change approach to social policy with particular stress upon the influence of values and human choice in creating a socially just world, which guarantees all human rights. Within this humanistic framework, this course examines such basic issues as the theory and method of social policy analysis, political action toward social equality, internationalism, the creation of a human rights culture, interdisciplinary collaboration, and the strategic crafting of policy argument.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 613 - Social Welfare Policy 3


    This course emphasizes the actual execution of policy by providing a focal point for students’ growth as independent scholar-practitioners and public-spirited citizens in the field of social policy. In seminar format, it builds upon the foregoing sequence by considering state-of-the-art approaches and honing skills to advance policy and underscores a variety of analysis and action strategies, such as critical education, creative dialogue, lobbying, organizing, campaigning, testifying, and monitoring.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and

    (Prerequisite is not required of students with Advanced Standing status)



    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 621 - A Survey of Social Work Research Methods


    This course provides a survey of the major approaches to social research using quantitative methods: Cross-sectional and longitudinal designs, group designs, survey research, experimental design, program level evaluation, and single system design. Students will work in teams to conduct a study based on their Field internship. Some specific concepts to be covered include: the scientific method, NASW code of Ethics, variables and measures, reliability and validity, external and external validity, probability and non-probability sampling, frequencies, correlations, the normal curve, and, elementary data analysis. Our research text includes EPAS core competencies-clearly linking the value of social research to social work profession.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 623 - Social Work Research 2


    This advanced course stresses qualitative methodology and its relevance for social work theory and practice. While it continues to emphasize primary areas of social work, such as clinical practice and program and policy development, its emphasis is upon the elicitation of the structure and meaning of lived experiences of individuals in social settings.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 630 - Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees


    This course examines the profession of social work’s role in advocating for, enacting and implementing social policies and programs that benefit immigrants and refugees; social practices that encompass the diversity of immigration experiences, current international refugee situations, theories of social adjustment and acculturation; the cross-cultural skills needed to understand complex family dynamics of foreign-born populations; inter-and intra-ethnic tensions; cultural competence in social work interventions; and specific issues of oppression and social justice that face refugees and immigrants.

    Prerequisites & Notes





    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 631 - Social Work Practice 1


    This course establishes the generalist perspective as the framework for the practice sequence. It provides information on the historical base of social work with a strong emphasis on the underlying values and ethics of the social work profession with a respect for human diversity (culture, race, class, religion, sexual orientation, gender, differential ability, etc.). The emphasis is on learning the interviewing skills involved in doing a psychosocial assessment and understanding the phases of the helping process. Differential theoretical constructs, assessment and intervention skills used in direct practice with individuals and families are examined.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 632 - Social Work Practice 2


    This course continues within the advanced generalist framework established in Practice 1. It examines assessment, goal setting, and interventions with groups and communities. Students have the opportunity to examine issues of empowerment and work with a diverse client population. Ethical dilemmas relative to group and community work are also examined.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 633 - Social Work Practice 3


    This course utilizes the knowledge and skills gained in the foundation courses and advances these using more comprehensive models of assessment, theory, and intervention. The theoretical assessment of vulnerable and/or at risk populations provides the context for the application of sophisticated micro and macro interventions.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 634 - Social Work Practice 4


    This is an advanced course designed to assist students in gaining the knowledge and skills required to enter into the complex arena of interaction within and between human service organizations and to prepare students to assume management roles and responsibilities. As such, it builds on the foundation content in Practice 2, in leadership in communities and organizations, as well as on foundation content in the Policy, HBSE, and Research sequences.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 642 - Therapeutic Applications of Adventure


    This course is designed to provide thestudent with a theoretical understanding and practical working knowledge of the use ofexperiential education and adventureactivities as an element of social workpractice with vulnerable and resilientpopulation.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 643 - Seminar in Social Work Practice with Diverse Populations


    This seminar provides an in-depth experience of assessment, intervention, and evaluation in work with diverse groups of individuals, families, and small groups. Theoretical and conceptual overviews of ethnicity, culture, stigma, and oppression will be examined. The seminar focuses on understanding the impact of internalized and institutional oppression and refinement of interventive skills when a multiplicity of factors may be operating.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 645 - Contemporary Challenges in Child Welfare


    This course focuses on children and families as they relate to and are a part of the larger social system and its institutions of education, politics, economics, and religion. Particular attention is on families and children as victims of child abuse, neglect, and domestic violence. Processes which facilitate client healing and the use of interdisciplinary and collaborative community resources are examined.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 646 - Social Work Practice with Families


    This course focuses on children and families in crisis by concentrating on issues of power distribution, communication system, and external institutional influences. Learning family treatment approaches and techniques of problem identification and assessment are introduced through examination of strategies to help families deal with maturation and situational crises.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 647 - Loss and Grief


    This course is offered as a distance learning course. It prepares the MSW student for social work practice with clients coping with loss and bereavement. The initial focus increases students’ awareness of, and sensitivity to, issues related to death, dying, disability and bereavement. Theories of attachment and loss are used as a framework for assessing bereavement reactions in clients in different developmental stages and from different cultural backgrounds. Therapeutic interventions are examined and applied through case discussions and experiential exercises.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 648 - Substance Abuse in Social Work Practice


    This course provides an opportunity to study substance abuse practice concepts and skills with emphasis on assessment, treatment planning, and intervention strategies with individuals and families affected by substance abuse. Evaluation of individual and family substance abuse problems is emphasized, with particular attention to the complex interaction with domestic violence.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 652 - Legal Aspects of Social Work Practice


    This course examines law and legal processes using legal materials and teaches legal advocacy skills. Among the areas explored are social work malpractice, privileged communication, and discrimination. Selected types of dispute resolution are explored, with emphasis on developing initial skills in testifying and negotiation.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 653 - Working with Older Adults for Clinicians, Administrators, and Activists


    This course is designed to provide an overview of the multifaceted issues in gerontology. It explores the phenomenon of growing old in America, from the changing demographics of society that will command our attention in the years ahead, to the pressing need for satisfactory long-term care arrangement. This course seeks to further students’ understanding of the myths and realities of aging, the role of social work in gerontology, health and social policy as it relates to aging, special populations, and research issues in gerontology.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 654 - Mediation and Conflict Resolution for Clinicians, Managers, and Activists


    This course teaches widely applicable mediation skills through enactment approaches. Focus is on evaluation and intervention in different types of conflict, finding common ground, and developing collaborative, win-win strategies resulting in lasting agreements. The course is predominantly experiential. Students learn mediation skills through extensive use of role plays and other enactment approaches.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 656 - School Social Work and the Education of Exceptional Children


    This course provides an overview of social work practice in public education settings. It furnishes information on the historical roots of school social work with a strong emphasis on the diverse roles and skills required to work effectively with many stakeholders. Since many school social workers are funded under the auspices of special education, this course examines the historical background information related to the field of special education legislation and litigation.It reviews the components necessary foreffective collaboration and consultation with parents, school personnel and other professionals. The course will primarily focus on the definition and characteristics of exceptionalities with an emphasis on understanding the growth and development of exceptional children who include both disabled and gifted and talented children.Particular attention is given to the role of theschool social worker and teachers in identifying, planning for and working effectively with special-needs children in the regular classroom.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 670 - Severe and Persistent Mental Illness


    This course focuses on the strengths based approaches to practice with people with severe and persistent mental illness and their families. Primary among these approaches are strengths based case management, assertive community treatment and psycho-educational groups. Students will be helped to understand and address the bio-psycho-social conditions associated with serious mental illness. Special attention will be given to the impact of gender, race, ethnicity, socio-economic status and sexual orientation on the treatment of persons with severe and persistent mental illness and to the effects of mental health policy on these groups.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MSSW 674 - Field Seminar 1


    Field Seminar1

    Credits: 0.5








  
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    MSSW 676 - Field Seminar 2


    Field Seminar2

    Credits: 0.5








  
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    MSSW 677 - Field Seminar 2 - Second Half


    Field Seminar2 - Second Half

    Credits: 0.5








  
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    MSSW 684 - Field Practicum 1 - First Half


    In this course, Field Practicum and Field Seminar are taken concurrently as a single integrated foundation experience in generalist social work practice. In the agency-based practicum, the direct service experience requires psycho-social assessments, interagency collaboration, and relationship-based services to individuals and groups. The community organization experience requires involvement in community problems concerning lack of equality in human rights and basic social needs. Students identify community problems, set goals, and begin intervention.

    Credits: 3.5








  
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    MSSW 685 - Field Practicum I - Second Half


    In this course, Field Practicum and Field Seminar are taken concurrently as a single integrated foundation experience in generalist social work practice. In the agency-based practicum, the direct service experience requires psycho-social assessments, interagency collaboration, and relationship-based services to individuals and groups. The community organization experience requires involvement in community problems concerning lack of equality in human rights and basic social needs. Students identify community problems, set goals, and begin intervention.

    Credits: 3.5








  
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    MSSW 686 - Field Practicum 2 - First Half


    These are concentration courses in advanced generalist practice with Field Practicum and Field Seminar taken concurrently. The agency-based practicum emphasizes direct service organizations, and work with diverse multi-problem clients requiring complex multi-level intervention and advocacy. The administration experience requires an active contribution to the ongoing management activities of the practicum agency.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3.5








  
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    MSSW 687 - Field Practicum 2 - Second Half


    These are concentration courses in advanced generalist practice with Field Practicum and Field Seminar taken concurrently. The agency-based practicum emphasizes direct service organizations, and work with diverse multi-problem clients requiring complex multi-level intervention and advocacy. The administration experience requires an active contribution to the ongoing management activities of the practicum agency.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3.5








  
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    MSSW 688 - Special Topics in Social Work


    This course provides an opportunity for concentrated exploration and experience in a specialized or current area of relevance to social work. Topics are offered on a variable basis. A student may register for this course more than once, provided the topic is different each time.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Social Work major or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 1-4








  
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    MSSW 692 - Independent Study


    Graduate students with special needs, interests, and capacities conduct individual study under faculty supervision involving library work, tutorial work, research, independent reading or writing, or other approved study which contributes to the educational growth of a particular student.

    Credits: 1-4








  
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    MSSW 693 - Being a Leader & The Effective Exercise of Leadership


    One of the six core values of Social Work is to effectively help those we serve. This is our competence, along with committing to values of service, social justice, a person’s dignity and worth, the importance of human relationships, and integrity. These values, by definition, not only require leadership on our part, but also define leadership.

    This course is based on transformative learning methodologies developed over the past ten years by a team of academics and organizational change consultants. To date, the majority of academic research about leadership has focused on individual characteristics or traits and leadership behaviors that distinguish effective and ineffective leaders. Instead of learning behaviors, and trying to emulate what other leaders do, we need access to the being of a leader, and the effective exercise of leadership. Rather than being better able to explain and understand what happens, we want access to making it happen. We will approach this through an ontological inquiry, by exploring the importance of context - the way in which people and events occur or seem to us. During the course, we will develop a context for leadership with the power to give you the being and actions of a leader, and the effective exercise of leadership as your natural self-expression. We will also provide you the opportunity to become aware of and deal with personal obstacles (ontological constraints) to the exercise of leadership, allowing you to relax the grip those obstacles have on you and your ability to access your natural leadership capacity.

    Credits: 3









Sociology

  
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    SOCI 101 - Introduction to Sociology


    This course provides an introduction to sociological thought, research, concepts, and theory.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 133 - The YMCA Past, Present, and Future


    This course provides an understanding of the development of the YMCA movement, including its past, present status, and future trends. The development of social, religious, and educational philosophies are studied along with past and present programs. Pertinent issues of the YMCA are examined as it responds to changing needs and challenges. This course is recommended for those considering a career with the YMCA.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 190 - Community Service


    Community Service

    This course is repeatable for a maximum of 2 credits.

    Credits: 1-2








  
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    SOCI 210 - Social Problems


    This course examines specific social problems in the context of social structure and culture, with special attention given to issues of social justice.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 220 - Families in Society


    This course focuses on the sociological analysis of the family, its development as a social institution, its relationship to society, and its contribution to personality.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 240 - Global Social Issues


    This general education course explores current political, economic, cultural, and social changes that are transforming our world. We focus on globalization and its consequences, drawing on theoretical perspectives from sociology and other disciplines. We examine how countries are increasingly interconnected by flows of information, people, and money and develop our understanding about the consequences of globalization for people, business, and nations. The class ends by studying social movements working to increase understanding and reduce the harmful impacts of some negative outcomes of globalization.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 250 - Youth in Society


    This course is designed to provide a critical comparative framework for interpreting the experiences and perceptions of youth in the United States. We consider the ways that society portrays youth, the effect of corporate culture on youth, the expression of youth identities through experiences like the prom, the internet, fashion, and music. We look at real people’s experiences within these contexts, and see how they operate as spaces for youth to internalize and confront social power relations reflected in age, social class, racial and ethnic, and gendered norms.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 265 - Environment and Society


    This course focuses on the interconnectedness of human communities and their environments, exploring current environmental issues using the tools and insights of sociology.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 312 - Genders in Society


    This class focuses on sociological analysis of gender relations. Sociological concepts and theories help to explain both differences and inequalities between men and women in United States society.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 322 - Racial and Ethnic Relations


    This course examines U.S. racial and ethnic relations by using sociological concepts and theories. Explanations of racial and ethnic oppression are emphasized.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 341 - Group Work


    This course is an introduction to group work methods. The course concentrates on teaching the essential techniques and behaviors used by group workers in a variety of settings. Individual relevant cases and examples of the application of group work techniques in community services are explored.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 347 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare


    This course is a survey of social welfare services in the United States, with an emphasis on current needs and programs. This course studies the various programs and services that are established in communities as responses to perceived social problems in these localities.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SOCI 375 - Cities and Communities


    The characteristics and functions of cities and metropolitan areas have changed as a result of new economic, social, and political realities in the U.S. and the world. This course focuses on the consequences of these changes on urban communities and the people who live in them. Using an assets approach, and using Springfield as our case study, the course explores effective community development strategies that can be used to both evaluate and intervene in various aspects of the “urban crisis.”

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 388 - Special Topics in Sociology


    This course is a comprehensive examination of a contemporary issue or social problem of importance to society.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 410 - Poverty and Wealth: Class in Society


    This course begins by documenting economic inequality and discussing myths that prevent people from fully comprehending this inequality. A variety of sociological concepts and theories is used to analyze the causes and consequences of the economic inequality. Sociological analysis and critique of the mechanics of the capitalist system in the United States are a central focus of the class.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 420 - Media and Society


    This course is focused on the mass media, including television, film, newspapers, magazines, and radio. A variety of sociological theories is employed to understand the relationship between media texts, production, and consumption. The class examines the relationship between society and the mass media, especially in regard to issues of power. The students analyze the studies of others and perform their own analyses. Offered during alternate years.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 430 - Sociology of Health and Health Care


    This course surveys health and medicine from a sociological perspective. It focuses on how social forces create illness, influence our ideas about the meaning of illness and disability, and shape the structure of health care institutions as well as the work and social positions of health care professionals.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 433 - YMCA Management


    This course is a study of present-day management concepts and practices, program development, and planning objectives for the administration and operation of the YMCA. Management models of selected YMCA’s are studied. Methods and strategies pertinent to the continuation and implementation of YMCA’s and other agencies are explored. Recommended for students planning a career with the YMCA.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SOCI 486 - Fieldwork in Sociology


    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply sociocultural theory and methods outside of the classroom. Under close supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Social Science, students are permitted to work in criminal justice, welfare services, census bureaus, museums, and polling organizations. This provides students with career choices, future employment contacts, and pre-professional experience.

    Credits: 2-12








  
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    SOCI 492 - Social Research and Program Evaluation


    This course examines methods of social research. An introduction is made to research procedures such as research design, methods of data collection, and the examination of various studies. Construction of actual research designs and instruments by individuals or groups of students is conducted. Limited enrollment.

    Credits: 3









Spanish

  
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    SPAN 103 - Culture and Language of Spain


    This course provides a fundamental understanding of Peninsular culture, history, and language.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SPAN 104 - Latin American Culture and Language


    This course provides a fundamental understanding of the Spanish language, as well as the history and cultures of the Spanish-speaking people of the Americas.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SPAN 111 - Elementary Spanish I


    This course is offered to students with no experience of the Spanish language. It emphasizes the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Learning to communicate effectively in Spanish and introducing Spanish-American and Peninsular cultures is another major course objective. Active classroom participation and laboratory experience are required.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SPAN 112 - Elementary Spanish II


    This course is a continuation of SPAN 111.  It progressively develops listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in order to enhance students’ ability to communicate effectively.  Aspects of culture of the Spanish-speaking world are explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPAN 111 - Elementary Spanish I  

    or

    the successful completion of two years of Spanish at the secondary school level.



    Credits: 3








  
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    SPAN 211 - Intermediate Spanish I


    This course is an expansion in the development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Students are introduced to the culture and literature of Spain and Spanish America and are expected to communicate in both oral and written Spanish. Class is conducted in Spanish.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Requires SPAN 112 - Elementary Spanish II  

    or

    three or more years of Spanish at the secondary school level



    Credits: 3








  
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    SPAN 212 - Intermediate Spanish II


    Learning to communicate effectively in Spanish, both orally and in writing, through
    the expansion of the vocabulary, increased grammatical accuracy, and paragraph-level
    discourse, is a major goal of the course.  Aspects of the various cultures of the      
    Spanish-speaking world is integrated into all areas of study.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Requires SPAN 211 - Intermediate Spanish I  

    or

    three or more years of Spanish at the secondary school level.



    Credits: 3








  
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    SPAN 213 - Spanish for Health Care Professionals


    This course provides intermediate grammar topics continued stress on aural/oral communication skills. Learning to communicate effectively in Spanish, both orally and in writing, through the expansion of pertinent medical vocabulary and increased grammatical accuracy is a major goal of the course. Readings of medical and cultural topics supplement the text. Students participate in various medical scenarios. Near exclusive use of Spanish is required. Appropriate for students in all healthcare programs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    4+ years of high school Spanish

    or

    SPAN 211 - Intermediate Spanish I  

     



    Credits: 3









Special Courses

  
  •  

    SPCO 101 - First-Year Success


    This course aids in the transition from high school to college, provides knowledge of campus resources, and assists in the development of a strong and helpful relationship between students and their advisors. This course also teaches the development of time management, use of textbooks, note taking, review of course materials, and studying for examinations. Required for students in the undeclared major, may be taken by other first-year students as an elective.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    SPCO 108 - Learning Methods


    Learning methods are primarily information-processing procedures that facilitate the learning, retention, and application of knowledge and skill.  Learning how to learn is the focus of this course.  Skills covered will include Time Management and Breaking Down Tasks, Organization of Materials, Active Learning Strategies, Note Taking, Test Preparation and Taking, Active Reading, and Using Campus Resources.  This course will use lecture, discussion, and experimental formats. Thoughtful class participation is expected and essential to your successful completion of the course.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    SPCO 110 - First Year Seminar: Building Community and Success


    First Year Seminar is a course designed to help students transition successfully to 'engaged' membership in the SC community.  As such, first year students will be challenged  
    
    through learning opportunities designed to enhance their self-reflection and critical thinking skills as they make choices related to engagement in their program of study and  
    in the co-curriculum.  Designed to build a base of individual knowledge, skills, and attitudes for emerging membership in the community of SC graduates as leaders in      
    service, learning opportunities will provide experiential support for the academic and social skills needed by those who are successful Springfield College students.


    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SPCO 201 - Building Communication and Literacy Skills


    This course develops skills in reading and writing. Reading skills developed include critical reasoning, the identification of main ideas, detail, writer’s purpose, and idea relationships. Students develop the ability to write a written summary and directed composition with mastery using proper mechanics. The decision to focus on reading or writing will be determined by individual student needs.

    Credits: 0.5 - 1.0








  
  •  

    SPCO 220 - Internship Preparation Seminar


    This course will assist with formulating related materials needed to applying plan for internship positions. Resume and cover letter writing, interview preparation and business etiquette will be focused on through interactive exercises and presentations. This course will cover the critical aspects of the internship search process.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    SPCO 599 - Fieldwork in an Educational Setting


    This fieldwork experience is done in an educational setting. Students have the opportunity to observe and assist educators, as well as take full responsibility as an educator in a particular educational setting. Credits are flexible and depend on the number of clock hours completed.

    Credits: 1-14









Sport Management and Recreation

  
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    SMRT 101 - Introduction to Sport Management


    This course introduces students to general principles and practices in the sport industry. Students gain a general understanding and appreciation of career options that they will be prepared for as they complete the sport management major.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 102 - Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation


    An introduction to the philosophy, theories, and concepts of therapeutic recreation services in clinical and community-based settings. Exploration and expanded knowledge of diagnostic groupings, working with participants across the lifespan, terminology, practice guidelines and the role of therapeutic recreation specialist will be covered.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 103 - Introduction to the Global Recreation Industry


    This course introduces the student to the foundations of recreation and leisure services. Basic terminology, theories of play, historical perspectives of recreation and leisure, an examination of leisure providers and resources, an overview of employment opportunities, and introduction to current issues in the field are included.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 106 - Dynamics of Leadership


    This course is designed to introduce the student to theories, approaches, and styles of leadership utilized in the recreation profession. Topics for study include decision-making strategies, motivation techniques, principle-centered leadership, values, and ethical considerations. Additional areas include examination of communication processes, vision, and group dynamics.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 114 - Leisure in Modern Society


    This course provides students an opportunity to learn more about leisure in their life.  The conceptual foundations for understanding leisure in modern society, including basic terminology, concepts, theories, and contemporary issues are introduced.  International, social, psychological, cultural, and political views of leisure are also explored.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 116 - Event Management and Promotions


    This course focuses on fundamentals of event management and including basic promotional ideas. This will include: program planning process, identification of events/programs in the sport and recreation industry, programming formats, scheduling, evaluation methods, risk management, as well as, other factors involved in event planning/management.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 120 - Recreation Program Planning in Modern Society


    This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, comprehension and application techniques to create a variety of program plans in diverse settings. Attention will be given to the preparation, design, implementation and evaluation of program plans as they relate to Quality of Life Enrichment and Life Satisfaction. Several vital components of the planning process will focus on operations, management, market assessment models, evaluation and supervision.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 250 - International Relations through Sport Management


    This course examines the role of sport management in a global sport environment. A critical review of current sport practice and selected geographical regions of the world will be undertaken. Governance issues related to youth, elite and professional sport will be analyzed. Additional topics covered include social responsibility in international sport, international sport tourism and Springfield College contributions in the field of International Sport Management.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 253 - Processes and Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation


    This course is designed to provide an overview of processes and techniques used in treatment-oriented programs. Processes include assessing, establishing behavioral objectives, activity analysis and selection, documentation, charting terms, and evaluation. Techniques covered include, but are not limited to, behavior modification, recreation counseling, and group methodology.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 254 - Commercial Recreation and Tourism


    This course is an overview of the unique and dynamic nature of commercial recreation and tourism industries. Historical development, business planning, feasibility study development, management and operations, and marketing of commercial recreation and tourism business will be the focus of the course.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 255 - Introduction to Outdoor Leadership


    This course includes a detailed examination of the meaning, scope, and value of outdoor leadership. Emphasis is given to the historical and philosophical foundations of outdoor leadership, the direct application to instructional procedures for providing 
    leadership for outdoor education/recreation, and the planning and administration of such programs.  This course utilizes practical and lab exercises.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 270 - Communication in Sport and Recreation


    The course provides the student with a basic understanding of communications processes and how to manage and utilize these processes and effective ways. The students will learn the concepts and practices of effective communication through writing and verbal/oral assignments and presentations, reading assignments, case research and critical thinking. The course will cover areas including working with utilizing the various forms of media, particularly social media, the foundation of communications, the role of sport and recreation staff members and collegiate and professional sport organizations and recreation organizations, the ways in which interpersonal, interpersonal and small group communications are used in sport, recreation and business organizations, and finally how to use communications and advocacy and persuasion. Honed communication skills are an important management skill; some say it is the most important management competency.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 272 - Inclusive Recreation Services


    This course introduces students to the history, potential, opportunities, nature and barriers associated with inclusive recreation. The course addresses the concept of therapeutic recreation; persons with disabling conditions; and where, how and why inclusive recreation services are provided.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 278 - Customer Hospitality


    This course is designed to prepare students to demonstrate comprehension and application of quality customer service strategies, theories and initiatives. Students identify and analyze contemporary issues, cycles of service, and service strategy models. The dynamics of effective communication techniques and design and implementation of service delivery systems are appraised and synthesized. Analysis of service delivery enterprises are utilized.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 280 - Community Recreation


    This course is designed to explore the unique duties and responsibilities of a municipal/community recreation professional.  Content areas that will be integrated will include history, personnel, programming, politics, facilities, natural resource management, budgeting/finances, fundraising and grant/proposal writing.  A primary emphasis will focus on the creation of an organizational cultural that initiates and manages creative and quality programs, special events and camps for its constituents.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 304 - Marketing Issues in Sport and Recreation


    This course examines the application of marketing principles to the sport industry with an emphasis on event and athlete marketing, corporate sponsorship, and marketing research.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 307 - Campus and Intramural Recreation


    Foundations for campus and intramural recreation including: philosophy, theory, history, programming, operations, management, and professional standards.  The course is intended for undergraduate students with career interest in campus and intramural recreation.  Content includes an introduction to applied research practice in the field with emphasis on critical review of evidence-based outcomes.  Two thirds of the course will be lecture and discussion based, and one third will be a practicum in sports officiating conducted by campus recreation staff. 

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 330 - Nature Interpretation


    This course provides students with an in-depth investigation of the fundamental       
    principles and concepts of nature interpretation.  Topics include historical development of the field, principles of exhibit design, interpretative program designs and techniques, common field techniques and current trends used by outdoor leaders.  This course emphasizes experimental learning theories and their application to natural history interpretation and environmental education program design.  Students will develop and present interpretive materials and a nature interpretation program relevant to their course of study.                            

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 340 - Managing Client Services and Sales


    To reinforce the foundations of service to the client, this course is designed to provide students with the foundational and experiential knowledge about servicing all types of clients/customers in the field of sport. Primary concepts include understanding the role of client relations and ticketing in an organization, proper sales techniques, market study analysis, social media analytics, personal selling, networking, recruiting and selection of salespeople, sales training, developing and managing client/ticketing department, research processes, and evaluation of performance. Emphasis will be placed on case analysis, problem solving techniques, listening skills, communication, and field practice experience in modern society.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 278 - Customer Hospitality  



    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 350 - Marketing and Public Relations for Sport and Recreation Management


    This course examines the application of marketing and public relation principles.  Primary concepts include: public relations as a management function; the marketing, advertising, and research process; media relations; corporate sponsorship; communications and evaluation. 

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 360 - Supervisor Management for Recreation Services


    This course is designed to provide the student with a theoretical, philosophical and application based perspective on management for modern recreation services. Analyses of systems, processes and current events/trends will be explored in detail in order for students to evaluate specific management styles. Attention will be given to mission/vision statements, culture, empowerment, diversity, project teams and customers (external and internal).

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 365 - Venue and Personnel Management


    This course acquaints students with the scope and complexity of the operations, maintenance and management of sport and recreation venues with an emphasis on the motivation and development of human resources that operate, maintain and manage facilities.  The students develop an awareness of the wide variety of skills necessary for the operations and competent administration and maintenance of sport and recreation venues including stadiums, parks, golf courses, aquatic centers, ski areas, playing fields, ice arenas, and other facilities and areas common to the world of sport and recreation.  Further, this course explores the theoretical and practical aspects of personnel management and aforementioned venues, by deeply examining the staffing function of management in the dport and recreation venues environment.  Topics include examining the personnel needs of venues, job descriptions, organizational charts, background checks, training and development of staff, compensation and evaluation of employees.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 371 - Camp Facility Management


    This course acquaints the student with the planning, design, maintenance and management of indoor and outdoor facilities.  A study of the roles of Camp Directors in this process will be emphasized.  Design techniques, safety, construction materials, and compliance with state and accrediting agencies will be examined.  Select facilities will be studied in detail and regularly scheduled visits to facilities will be an integral part of the course. (visititations required)

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 375 - Adventure Theory and Practice


    This course teaches how to plan, implement and evaluate adventure education experiences for groups in an outdoor adventure setting. Students have the opportunity for supervised practical experience in group leadership. Topics such as experiential education, prominent adventure theorists; group dynamics, leadership styles and facilitation techniques are also stressed.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 384 - Practicum


    This course provides majors within the Department of Sport Management and Recreation with the opportunity to gain practical experience in their chosen area of emphasis. Students become familiar with the client population, the agency philosophy, programming approaches and general procedures. Students are required to complete a minimum of 120 clock hours of satisfactory work under the direct supervision of a qualified professional and to attend scheduled class meetings. Experiences will be shared, and solutions to problems discussed during these class meetings.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 411 - Therapeutic Recreation Management Practices


    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the management and development of community based therapeutic recreation services. Emphasis is placed on community based networking, management practices, leadership, marketing strategies, and sponsorship development. Environmental and community assessments and advocacy for and with persons with disabilities for therapeutic recreation service will be investigated.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 417 - Research in Sport and Recreation


    This course examines the research of individuals, organizations and populations   
    involved in sport management and recreation.  Students explore the concepts developed in relevant literature as they apply to sport management and recreation. Students are introduced to methods and techniques used in research, in recreation management, and the sport industry.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 419 - Camp Programming and Administration


    This course consists of lecture and laboratory sessions designed to cover selected organizations and administrative details in organized camping including: camp facilities and equipment, publicity, recruitment, insurance, programming, health and safety, budgetting and current issues.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 420 - Sport Governance and Strategy


    This course has been designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the role of governance in sport through a study of the structures, processes and policies of governing agencies and member organizations within the sport industry. The primary aim is to familiarize students with the basic understanding of organizational structures used in the management and governance of sport. Additionally, students will examine the role of strategy in the governance of sport at the amateur, professional and international level to further sport development.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 426 - Management of Natural Resources


    This course is designed to enable the student to develop an understanding of management concepts and practices and the interrelationship of land, water, flora, and fauna resources. Emphasis is placed on forestry principals, wildlife management, watershed protection, and soil conservation in the framework of the basic concept of multiple use.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 440 - Ethics in Sport and Recreation


    This course examines major ethical theories and their relation to the development of personal and professional ethics in sport management and recreation practitioners. The differences between ethics and morality will be analyzed and selected codes of ethics will be presented for review and discussion. The application of ethical decision making and problem solving in sport and recreation will be explored.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 473 - Therapeutic Recreation Programming


    This course is designed to provide an overview of procedures and techniques utilized in treatment-orientated settings and prepare the students with the essential principles and elements involved in effectively planning, organizing, conducting, supervising and promoting therapeutic recreation programs. Processes include APIE, establishing behavioral objectives, activity analysis and selection, and medical terminology. Techniques covered include but are not limited to behavior modification, recreation counseling, and group methodology. Emphasis is placed on practical application in a variety of settings to better meet the physical, psychological, emotional and social needs, interests and potential of persons with disabilities.

    Credits: 3








 

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