Dec 09, 2022  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Health Promotion

  
  •  

    HLTH 304 - Health Education Methods and Pre-Practicum: PreK-12


    The course is designed to help dually enrolled physical education/health education teacher preparation students further their pedagogical content knowledge and to introduce principles of curriculum development and instruction for grades pre-K through 12.  Students will apply and practice developmentally appropriate activities in school-based laboratory settings.  The primary focus will be to extend pre-service teacher knowledge of appropriate practices for planning, teaching, and evaluating as that knowledge relates to children receiving instruction in Elementary and Secondary Health Education. Students must earn a ‘C’ or better in HLTH 304 in order to matriculate for the practicum experiences.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 343 - Community Health Education


    This course helps students become effective community health educators by increasing knowledge in community health areas and enhancing individual health skills and competencies essential to this career field. This course also provides an overview of the organization, role, and structure of community health agencies, with a specific emphasis on the health education services.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 355 - Human Sexuality


    This course explores many aspects of sexuality with a focus on how one develops as a healthy sexual being. Students will explore the personal, social and cultural contexts of sexuality. Students will examine and discuss the broad range of human sexual expression including, but not limited to, the formation of sexual attitudes and myths, the physiology of human sexual systems, psychological aspects of sex and gender roles, love and relationships, sexual minorities, the development of healthy sexual behavior, and the role of sexuality in day-to-day interactions among individuals.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 360 - Violence and Bullying/Prevention and Intervention


    This course is designed to improve student’s knowledge, attitudes and behaviors in relation to interpersonal violence and bullying in their lives and the lives of others.  The course will focus on violent and bullying behavior as it applies to an individual’s overall health and wellness.  Participants will practice strategies to help them respond and react appropriately to conflicts, bullying, aggression, and violence in their lives. Various forms violence and bullying will be explored, including, but not limited to relationship violence, gang violence, cyberbullying, workplace bullying, microagression and suicide. The course offers a foundation for both scholarship and practice regarding identification of violent and bullying behaviors, as well as prevention and intervention in various settings; home, school, workplace and community.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HLTH 365 - The Dynamics of PsychoSocial Health Issues


    The purpose of this course is to allow students to study the effects of attitudes, emotions and relationships on health.  Students will examine the impact the mind has on the body and how attitudes and emotions directly affect an individual’s well-being. Students will explore a number of psychosocial health issues and the impact these issues have on health, including, but not limited to stress, fear, laughter, relationships, grief, joy, anger, and self-esteem. Students will practice skills like stress and anger management techniques, conflict resolution, communication skills, and self-care strategies to assist them in improving their own health and their relationships with others.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HLTH 386 - Pre-Practicum in Health/Family and Consumer Science PreK-8


    This is a supervised pre-practicum in grades PreK-8 of a public school that includes observation and participation in the work of the school. This course provides the student with exposure to various teaching methods and learning experiences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HLTH 304 - Health Education Methods and Pre-Practicum: PreK-12  with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

    and

    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.



    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    HLTH 387 - Pre-Practicum in Health/Family and Consumer Science 5-12


    This is a supervised pre-practicum in grades 5-12 of a public school that includes        
    observation and participation in the work of the school.  This course provides the student with exposure to various teaching methods and learning experiences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HLTH 304 - Health Education Methods and Pre-Practicum: PreK-12  with a grade of ‘C’ or better. 

    and

    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.



    Credits: 2








  
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    HLTH 417 - Organization, Administration, and Assessment for the School Health Program


    This course examines administrative relationships, procedures, and assessment techniques involved in the conduct of school health programs. Areas of study include: general policies, services and delivery systems, environment, reliability, personnel duties, curriculum development, and instruction. An emphasis on aligning program objectives and assessment strategies with the current Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Education Frameworks (MCHEF) will comprise a significant segment of required assignments.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HLTH 425 - Human Disease and Health Promotion


    This course examines a range of contemporary health and disease challenges for the 21st Century. Students examine the epidemiology and pathology of common diseases and the attendant psychosocial implications. Disease prevention and control are discussed through the lens of health promotion.  According to the World Health Organization (1986), “Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and determinants, and thereby improve their health”.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or Senior Status



    Credits: 3








  
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    HLTH 450 - Workshop in Family and Consumer Sciences


    Workshop in family and consumer sciences education prepares students to teach young people and train them for family life, work life, and careers in family and consumer sciences. The course will provide an opportunity for students to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors in the critical areas of FA CS, including, but not limited to; promoting optimal nutrition and wellness across the life span, managing resources to meet the material needs of individuals and families, balancing personal, home, family, and work lives, using critical and creative thinking skills to address problems in diverse family, community, and work environments, and functioning as providers and consumers of goods and services. Students must earn a ‘B’ or better in HLTH 450 in order to matriculate for the practicum experiences.

    Credits: 1-3








  
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    HLTH 484 - Health/Family and Consumer Science (PreK-8) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach elementary/middle school health/family & consumer science under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The experience includes between 150-225 clock hours, depending on the number of registered credits. A minimum of 150 clock hours, grades PreK-8, is required for those seeking licensure as a Health/Family & Consumer Science teacher (All levels).  A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTELs.



    Credits: 4-6








  
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    HLTH 485 - Health/Family and Consumer Science (5-12) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach secondary health/family & consumer science under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The experience includes between 150-225 clock hours, depending on the number of registered credits. A minimum of 150 clock hours, grades 5-12, is required for those seeking licensure as a Health/Family & Consumer Science teacher (All levels).  A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTELs.



    Credits: 4-6








  
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    HLTH 487 - Fieldwork in Health Promotion


    The fieldwork experience in health promotion gives students the opportunity to apply theory and knowledge learned in the classroom to the work situation through participation in a health organization’s daily activities. Students learn how to identify health needs of individuals and groups, and how to plan, coordinate and implement health education activities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Students must have successfully achieved advanced standing in the Health Promotion major.  In addition, students must meet with their faculty supervisor to discuss planning information and selection of an appropriate agency, prepare a resume to present to the agency supervisor at the time of the interview (it is recommended that the resume be shared with the faculty supervisor first), and familiarize themselves with the selected agency and then contact the selected agency to arrange for an interview.



    Credits: 6-12








  
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    HLTH 488 - Special Topics in Health Studies


    This course gives prospective classroom professionals an opportunity to study the special health issues and problems that arise in assisting students to change lifestyles or cope with special health needs. Through this course, students are better able to apply the communication and interpersonal skills necessary for promoting health and wellness.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HLTH 505 - Curriculum Construction in Health Education


    This course analyzes the essential components of and procedures for the development of a written standards-based/data-driven pre-K-12 comprehensive health education or interdisciplinary  (health education & physical education) curriculum.  Using the National Health Standards and the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Frameworks, students will design and write a standards-based/data-driven curriculum document geared to a specific grade level (preK-12).  Opportunity for interfacing physical education and health education instruction into a coherent interdisciplinary or cross-curricular written curriculums is often the typical instructional delivery model in grades preK-12, will be provided as one option for designing and developing a written curriculum document.  The importance of parental involvement in the delivery of meaningful and age-appropriate health or interdisciplinary curricular materials will be showcased as students enrolled in this course will evaluate the impact parenting roles and responsibilities have on strengthening the well-being of individuals and families via well-designed health instructional materials.  A variety of assessment tools and techniques will be explored completing the connection among instruction, curriculum, and evaluation.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HLTH 610 - Issues in Public Health and Health Promotion


    Contemporary public health issues are examined using a health promotion perspective. Recommendations forming the core of public health initiatives are analyzed regarding their rationale, structure, and function in promoting health and preventing disease. Current national goals and objectives for health promotion and disease prevention are covered. Issues in the interpretation of literature, public health recommendations, and principles and strategies for health behaviors are discussed. Strategies to pursue careers in health promotion and are examined.

    Credits: 3









Health Science

  
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    HSCI 101 - Introduction to Health Care


    Students in this course learn about the scope and domain of practice of various healthcare fields and explore the roles and relationships of health professionals within the U.S. healthcare system. Discussion and assignments address both the broader context of healthcare services and individual students’ experiences and interests. Students explore and develop plans for their own healthcare education and careers.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HSCI 130 - Introduction to Public Health


    This course introduces students to the population health approach to public health and describes a range of options for intervention to promote health and prevent disease. Topics include the history of public health, uses of health information, health risk, and the frequency of health problems, health screening, health promotion, a review of the U.S. public health system, the role of government in both public and preventative health, the comparison of U.S. health policy with other countries.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 201 - Introduction to Health Care Ethics


    Health care ethics presents some of the most intriguing and perplexing issues facing the country today.  This course introduces and explores issues such as scarce health care resources; the relationship between patient and health caregiver; experimentation with human subjects; social justice and the right to health care; assisted reproductive technologies; and euthanasia and assisted suicide.  We will discuss issues from the standpoint of different kinds of patients, medical professionals, and citizens who shape policy in a democrat ice society.  Ethical theories and concepts will be stressed.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HSCI 260 - Human Disease and Chronic Illness


    This course is a study of common and significant human diseases, including aspects of disease epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. The course will provide an overview of basic disease processes, disease by organ system, and diseases that affect multiple organ systems simultaneously. Attention is given to the basic terminology required to communicate effectively with medical personnel and to comprehend medical reports.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 101 - Introduction to Health Care  



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 310 - Genetics, Health and Behavior


    Students in this course learn about the scope and domain of practice of various healthcare fields and explore the roles and relationships of health professionals within the U.S. healthcare system. Discussion and assignments address both the broader context of healthcare services and individual students’ experiences and interests. Students explore and develop plans for their own healthcare education and careers.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 260 - Human Disease and Chronic Illness  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HSCI 320 - Concepts of Assessment in Health Care


    In this course, students familiarize themselves with the range and variety of techniques used in assessing health-related conditions and states. Common assessments in a range of health professions are discussed. Students learn how these assessments are performed, and how health professionals use the results of these assessments to inform subsequent interventions to improve patient health.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 101 - Introduction to Health Care  



    Credits: 3








  
  
  •  

    HSCI 340 - Principles of Epidemiology


    Epidemiology involves studying the distribution and causes or disease at the population level. This course is an introduction to the basic principles and methods of epidemiology, including study design concepts, quantitative methods, and critical thinking skills relating to the study of infectious and chronic disease. Students learn how epidemiologic principles and methods applied in the fields of health care and public health, and are introduced to the skills needed to evaluate the strengths and limitations of epidemiologic methods and to interpret the results of epidemiologic studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 325 - Biostatistics  

    or

    MATH 215 - Probability and Statistics  

    or

    PSYC 211 - Introduction to Statistics  



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 380 - Special Topics in Health Science


    By its nature, this course will be an offering where the topic will be different for each student. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior and Senior Health Science-General Studies students only and permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 384 - Practicum in Health Science


    This course is an individually contracted, practical experience under professional supervision in a Health Sciences setting.  It is intended to assist the student in exploring and confirming career goals.  Students engage in forty-five to fifty clock hours of supervised practicum per semester hour of credit.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Health Science-General Studies majors only.



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 410 - Health and Health Care Disparities


    The objective of this course is tofamiliarize students with the aspects ofculture that influence health status, thedevelopment of public health policy, and the management and practice of health care. The following topical areas will be examined:paradigms and explanations of mental and physical health disparities, populationcharacteristics by which health isstratified, access to health services, andhealth status outcomes. These culturalfactors impact patient-provider interaction, health and illness, behavior, and healthcare provided decision-making.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 260 - Human Disease and Chronic Illness  



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 411 - Cultural Competency for Health Professionals


    This course provides students with an exploration of cultural diversity as it relates to health professionals. Issues related to race, class, gender, age, sexual orientation and disability are examined. Emphasis is on gaining cultural self-awareness as well as on developing the skills necessary to build effective professional relationships with diverse individuals and groups.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 201 - Introduction to Health Care Ethics   



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 420 - Evidence-Based Health Care


    In recent decades, health care delivery has moved to an evidence-based model, whereby health care providers and policy makers are expected to make clinical decisions that are informed by research. However, despite its widespread acceptance as a mechanism for rational decision making, evidence-based healthcare remains in many ways an ideal rather than a reality. In this course, students critically evaluate health research with the goal of identifying effective treatment and prevention strategies, and learn to recognize and overcome the barriers that health professionals face in effectively incorporating research evidence into their clinical decision making.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 340 - Principles of Epidemiology   



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 460 - Health Law


    The health sciences student is exposed to the legal issues they are likely to face inthe delivery of health care, health care practice, and interactions with health care organizations. The further purpose is to help students understand how the legal system functions and how it affects the delivery of health care. The sources of laws, rules, and the legal process are examined. The student is also introduced to current legal issues in health care and the skills to analyze these issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 130 - Introduction to Public Health  



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 470 - Global Health


    This course joins the main concepts of the public health field to the critical links between global health and social and economic development. Students also review the burden of disease, risk factors, and key measures to address the burden of disease in cost-effective ways. The course is global in coverage, but with focus on low- and middle-income countries and on the health of the poor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 130 - Introduction to Public Health  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HSCI 475 - Maternal and Child Health


    This course examines the determinants, mechanisms and systems that promote the health, safety, well-being and appropriate development of children and their families in communities and societies, and examines birth in the context of the U.S. relative to global health. Themes of joy, fear, and pain in childbirth, as well as meanings of pregnancy will be explored in different times and places. A variety of urgent issues in global reproductive health are analyzed, such as reproductive rights, equity, access, and quality of healthcare during birth.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 130 - Introduction to Public Health  



    Credits: 3








  
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    HSCI 482 - Senior Capstone in Health Science


    This is a capstone course for seniors enrolled in the Health Science major, the Rehabilitation and Disability Studies major, or the Communication Disorders major. Students in this course explore and research health-related issues in their field of study. The course culminates with students presenting a research-based project.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 320 - Concepts of Assessment in Health Care  

    Senior class standing with a minimum of 90 credit hours completed. This course is open to students in the Health Science, Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, and Communication Disorders majors.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HSCI 494 - Research Seminar in Health Science


    This writing intensive course gives students the opportunity to design a feasible student-led research project related to the fields of health care or rehabilitation. Students learn to generate a compelling research question and hypothesis, and to develop a scientific research proposal informed by existing research. Students also learn strageies to understand and communicate scientific infromation effectively.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSCI 320 - Concepts of Assessment in Health Care  

    and

    HSCI 340 - Principles of Epidemiology  



    Credits: 3









Health Studies

  
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    HLTH 517 - Organization, Administration, and Assessment for the School Health Program


    This course examines administrative relationships, procedures, and assessment techniques involved in the conduct of school health programs. Areas of study include: general policies, services and delivery systems, environment, reliability, personnel duties, curriculum development, and instruction. An emphasis on aligning program objectives and assessment strategies with the current Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Education Frameworks (MCHEF) comprise a significant segment of required assignments.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 525 - Human Disease and Health Literacy


    This course examines a wide range ofcontemporary health problems.Studentsexamine the epidemiology and pathology ofmajor diseases and the attendantpsychosocial implications. The preventionand control are discussed through the lens of health literacy. Health literacy is thedegree to which individuals have the capacity obtain, process, and understand basichealth information and services needed tomake appropriate health decisions.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HLTH 601 - Health Behavior


    This course provides the students with a broad theoretical base for the analysis ofhealth behaviors. Major health behaviormodels and theories, and their applicationsare presented. Theory is integrated intoanalysis of specific behaviors, which impacthealth. Sociological, cultural, economic,and environmental factors, which influencehealth, are emphasized. Students are exposed to basic applications and theories of healthcounseling. Psychological issues related tocoping with illness and death are covered.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 614 - Planning of Health Promotion Programs


    Students investigate best practices for techniques of need assessment, program design, administration, and evaluation of health promotion programs that can apply across a variety of settings. Students study literature in the field and work in small groups applied problem-solving situations. A data-driven program evaluation plan is designed.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 640 - Techniques of Applied Nutrition


    This course is a study in applied nutrition as related to human health. Health issues related to nutritional deficiencies and excesses, and related therapies are discussed. Practical applications of sound nutritional principles are the focus of this course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 682 - Seminar in Health Promotion


    This seminar considers problems and provides advanced study in health promotion and wellness management programs. A graduate student, with permission of the advisor, may register for this seminar only two times.

    Credits: 1-3








  
  •  

    HLTH 686 - Fieldwork in Health Promotion


    A fieldwork experience designed to supplement classroom study by providing direct insights into the operation of a health promotion program through a participant-observer experience

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Consent of fieldwork supervisor.



    Credits: 1-3









Health, Physical Education and Recreation

  
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    HPER 301 - Short Term Study Abroad - Ireland


    This course will provide students withacademic and cultural experiences. Theacademic focus will include the globalization of athletic training and exercise science. The cultural include introductions to thearts, religion, historical, academic,landscape and interaction with Irish citizens and current students and faculty withappropriate visits to historical sites.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HPER 350 - Wilderness First Responder


    This course is designed to provide outdoor professionals with the knowledge and skills to deal with crisis in remote settings.  The W.F.R. certification is the most widely 
    recognized certification for outdoor leaders.  With an emphasis on prevention and decision-making, practical simulations and labs provide practice in backcountry leadership and rescue skills. *Students who successfully complete this course will receive a S.O.L.O. WFR certification card.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    18 years of age and permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HPER 645 - Marketing Issues in Sport and Recreation


    This course provides the student with basic knowledge and understanding of sports marketing and promotions on the educational, recreational, and professional levels. Attention is given to a history of sports marketing, definition of terms, principles of marketing, strategic market planning, and evaluation of sports marketing programs. Components of the course include developing products, sponsorships, special event fundraising, public relations, utilizing television, and radio networking.

    Credits: 3









History

  
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    HIST 101 - Survey of the History of Western Civilization


    This course examines the evolution of civilization from prehistoric culture through the ancient world to the seventeenth century. Emphasis is given to a global perspective, interrelationships between major world cultures, and the forces of change in political, economic, social, and intellectual institutions.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 102 - The Making of the Modern World


    This course surveys the development of ideas, institutions, and social processes in the modern world from the seventeenth century to the present. Consideration is given to both Western tradition and the diversity and interrelationships between the various cultures that comprise our contemporary world.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 103 - World History


    This course deals with the major developments and encounters of world civilizations from antiquity to the present. The aim is to develop a deeper understanding of the forces for change and patterns of continuity throughout history in order to better understand our global, yet diverse, world today.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 105 - Colonial America to the Civil War


    This is a survey of America’s history from the period of earliest explorations to the Civil War. Colonial settlement, the nature of the Revolution and U.S. Constitution, western settlement, and slavery are among the many areas covered.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 106 - The Civil War to Modern America


    This is a survey of America’s history from the Civil War period to the present. The impact of industrialization, America’s emergence as a world power, the New Deal, and more recent cultural, social, political, and economic trends are emphasized.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 150 - Leadership in U.S. History: The White House


    This course examines leadership in U.S. History through the lens of the executive branch and the First Couple. Inparticular, students examine changes over time in attitudes toward the White House, the participation of the president’s spouse in public life, and the role of technology in presidential politics. Key points of emphasis include the marketing of the presidency, the relationships between presidents and their spopuses, and the role of religion and the presidency.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 201 - Making History Public


    This course introduces students collaborate to research, plan, and producing a museum exhibit about Springfield College’s history based on research in the Springfield College Archives and Special Collections. Students select the archival materials to be exhibited, prepare captions and other explanatory materials for the museum exhibit, and consider how best to display the results of their archival research. Topics vary by semester and include: Springfield College and World War I; Springfield College and the Origins of Women’s College Athletics; Springfield College and the Student Movements of the 1960s; and Springfield College: An Environmental History.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 210 - African American History


    This survey of Afro-American history includes the following topics the Atlantic slave trade, pre-Civil War conditions, lives and contributions of enslaved and free people, Civil War and Reconstruction doubts and hopes, post-Reconstruction struggles between Euro- and Afro-Americans through the 1950’s, and the Civil Rights activism of the 1960’s and early 1970’s.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 223 - History of Russia


    This course begins with a brief survey of Russian history from the earliest time through the nineteenth century. It concentrates on the reforms, revolutionary movements, and the decline of imperial Russia, and concludes with an overview of the Soviet period.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 260 - The Civil War Era in History and Memory


    This course investigates the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. Major topics include the expansion of African American slavery and growth of antislavery sentiment; the political crisis of the 1850’s; soldiers’ and civilians’ experiences in the war; emancipation; and the debate over African Americans’ political and social status during Reconstruction. Special attention is given to how public monuments, Hollywood, and historical museums have influenced Americans’ memory of the Civil War era.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 310 - American Immigration History


    This course examines the history of immigration and ethnicity in America from the colonila period to the present. Major topics include distinctive patterns of voluntary and involuntary migration; the origins and evolving nature of American citizenship; the meaning of ethnicity and construction of ethnic identities; patterns of nativism, racism, restriction, and exclusion; and the evolution of American immigration policy.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 325 - The Ancient and Classical World


    This is a survey of the political, social, and economic history of the Near Eastern, Mediterranean, and Western European world between 4000 B.C. and 500 A.D. The contributions of the major religious traditions and the Grecian and Roman cultures to modern civilizations are emphasized.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 326 - Medieval History


    This course examines developments and achievements of European civilizations from 350 to 1500 A.D. The division and decline of the Roman Empire, Byzantine reorganization and expansion, feudalism, urbanization, the social role of the Christian Church in Eastern and Western Europe, the universities, new art forms, the birth of national states, and the transition to modern history are emphasized.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 327 - Early Modern Europe


    This course begins with a consideration of Renaissance and Reformation of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries as the harbinger of the modern age. It analyzes the evolution of modern science, Baroque and the Enlightenment, and concludes with a study of the background to the French Revolution.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 335 - Modern China


    China’s transformation between the Opium War (1839-1842) and the 1990’s may be seen as a progressive adjustment to the modern world or as an ever-intensifying revolution in Chinese government, society, and culture. This course combines the two approaches, exploring the problem of modernizing and revolutionary China through the eyes of participants and the debates of historians.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 360 - Early American Thought and Culture


    This course is a study of American ideas and culture from the Colonial Period to the mid-nineteenth century. Particular attention is given to such areas as social and political thought, religion, philosophy, literature, science, education, and reform.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 361 - Modern American Thought and Culture


    This is a study of American ideas and culture from the early nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. Particular attention is given to such areas as social and political thought, religion, philosophy, literature, science, and education.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 365 - Environmental History of America


    This course examines American attitudes toward nature, space, land, and resources from the earliest settlements to the present. The history of public land policy, the conservation movement, federal and state policies, and environmental concern are traced.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 387 - Studies in History - America in the World


    Studies in History - America in the World

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 388 - Studies in History - American


    This course deals with one or more of the great issues that have shaped the history of civilization. It is designed to recognize, discuss, and analyze controversial issues and problems, with particular attention to how man dealt with them. Issues may be selected from any period of the Eastern or Western worlds.

    Credits: 3-4








  
  •  

    HIST 389 - Studies in History - Non-American


    Studies in History - Non-American

    This course is repeatable up to a total of nine credits when taken with different topics.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 405 - The History of the Soviet Union


    This is an analysis of Communist theory and interpretations of Soviet practice in selected areas of political, social, and cultural life since the Revolution in 1917. Areas of attention include education and social sciences, the natural and physical sciences, religion, the arts, economic agencies and institutions, agencies of social control, and the USSR’s relations with other nations of the world. Not offered every year.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 441 - Supervised Experience in History


    This course gives students a fieldwork opportunity under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. Students do extensive research off campus and participate in learning experiences in local, state, or national settings.

    Credits: 1-3








  
  •  

    HIST 450 - Europe Since 1900


    This is an examination of the political, social, and economic development of major European nations from World War I to the present, with special emphasis on the causes and results of the two catastrophic wars and the efforts towards the creation of a world collective security system.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 481 - Recent American History


    This is an examination of the political, diplomatic, and cultural trends in American history since 1945. Emphasis is on topics such as the Truman Presidency; the Cold War; the McCarthy Era; the New Frontier; the war in Vietnam; the Nixon, Ford, and Carter years; the SALT Talks; inflation; the Energy Crisis; and the Middle East. Not offered every year.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HIST 482 - History Seminar


    This is a seminar for history majors. Studies of historians, historiography, and professional demands are made. A major research paper is required.

    Credits: 3-4









Honors

  
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    HNRS 100 - Honors First Year Seminar


    Honors First-Year Seminar deeply investigates a course theme; builds college-level, transferable skills in critical thinking, reading, communicating, and leadership development; explores multiple discipline-specific methods of inquiry and scholarship; and develops in students an appreciation for interdisciplinary learning.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to Honors Program students only



    Credits: 3








  
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    HNRS 141 - Honors Guided Individual Study


    This course provides honors students the opportunity to conduct research, or to pursue an individual creative of scholarly project, under the supervision of a faculty member.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to Honors Program students only



    Credits: 1-3








  
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    HNRS 192 - Honors Colloquium


    The Honors Colloquium is a one-credit honors course taken in conjunction with a different two-, three- or four-credit course. Student(s) meet with the supervising faculty member in weekly one-hour individual or small group sessions to explore topics of the co-enrolled course in greater depth or from a new perspective. 

    notes:  may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits total

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Open to students in the Honors Program only



    Credits: 1









Human Services

  
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    HUSB 101 - Administration I


    This course examines the dynamics, strategies and tactics of legal policies, personnel work and the development of a healthy work climate.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 104 - Basic Management Skills


    This course emphasizes the improvement of skills in managing human service programs through a study of management functions, theories and systems as well as situational leadership, decision-making and planning.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 107 - Ethical Decision-Making


    This course focuses on decision-making theory, options and implications as itrelates to the work of human service professionals. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence and role of critical reflection and values, ethical standards, guidelines, and professional/legal responsibilities.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 109 - Group Dynamics


    This course provides students with opportunities to learn the dynamics of group and organizational life. The focus is the nature of authority as well as interpersonal, intergroup and institutional dynamics. Much of the work is experiential within a theoretical context.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 111 - Education, Work and Social Welfare


    This course is an introduction to the field of human services, its history and evolution in the US, and the values and ideologies that shape and influence its practices. Through sharing and comparing personal experiences in education, work settings and social services, students develop a critical analysis of human services, with particular attention to the role of culture.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 112 - Social Factors on Health


    This course explores how various social factors and physical conditions (e.g. poverty, quality housing, exposure to violence, educational and job opportunities, discrimination, physical barriers, environmental hazards) affect the health of the individual. Students also examine the interconnected relationship with the healthcare delivery system in the general human service system.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 117 - Volunteerism and Human Services


    This course explores the impact of volunteerism on the delivery of human services. Through a study of its historical context, students examine the current applications of volunteerism as an economic human resource and critical support mechanism for delivery of human services. Each student analyzes at least one human service agency and the ways in which volunteers contribute to the effective functioning of the agency.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 118 - Oral Communication


    Is this course emphasizes the importance of effective oral communication. The role of oral communication in different settings will be reviewed. The principles and techniques of persuasive public speaking will be addressed with emphasis on developing skills and correct pronunciation, public speaking and effective communication in different settings.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 119 - Communications Skills I


    This course will not only help the student improve his or her writing skills, but allow the student to feel more comfortable with writing, so it becomes a regular part of critical analysis, of self-expression, and communication as a whole in one’s professional development. This course will focus on the relationship between writing and the nurturing of perspective. It will concentrate on organizational structures, grammar, clarity of points of view, and the fundamentals of good writing-and in doing so will focus on the natural progression from reflective to issue-oriented writing.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 121 - The Study of Theatre and Drama in Expressing Social Change and Social Justice


    The study of Theater and Drama in expressing Social Change and Social Justice will include a review of the historical development of the use of this art form to identify or express concerns of social change and social justice. Visual examples and demonstrations such as video, dramatic videodisk, scripts, and skits will be used to examine social issue events. The students will also participate in creating dramatic presentations, which expresses social change and social justice in our current society.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 122 - Introduction to Basic Counseling Techniques


    With a particular emphasis on empathy techniques, this course explores issues of assessment, listening, responding, transference, counter-transference, the conceptualization and organization of intervention, and effective cognitive and behavioral strategies.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 124 - Web Design


    The course is designed to teach students how to create, evaluate and publish web pages. Students will work with principles of web effective web design as well as the basics of maintenance and publishing.


    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 125 - PowerPoint


    This course is designed to allow students to explore the use of PowerPoint and the many options available with this program. The student will have the opportunity to learn and practice a variety of PowerPoint skills.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 126 - Social Service Networks


    This course looks at how people are referred to various agencies, how information about them is used, the obligations agencies have to follow up on referrals, and whether or not the agencies work cooperatively to solve human service problems. It also provides a theoretical understanding of networking.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 128 - Word Processing


    This course is designed to allow students to explore the use of Microsoft Word and the many options available with this program. Students learn basic formatting and more advanced techniques such as creating a table of contents, changing headings in a document, changing and creating headers and footers and working with clipart.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 129 - Spreadsheet


    This course is designed to allow students to explore the use of Microsoft Excel and the many options available with this program. The student will learn and practice a variety of skills and learn the benefits of using spreadsheets.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 130 - Introduction to Community Organizing


    This course provides students with a theoretical foundation for such practical aspects of community organizing as: why organize; who is an organizer; when to organize; how to execute one’s plans effectively; how to build coalitions and support groups; and how to negotiate.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 136 - Puerto Rico: Analysis and Perspectives


    This course deals with the political, economic and social history of Puerto Rico and of Puerto Ricans in the United States.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 137 - Canoeing


    The course is intended to give students the opportunity to use environmental opportunities in their area for the purposes of improved fitness and stress reduction. Students will prepare for and complete a day canoeing trip with the class group, Students will then plan and complete a canoe trip of their own choosing.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 138 - Critical Thinking Through Literature


    This course uses current literature to illustrate alternative ways of thinking about the human condition and making sense of social issues. Discussion will compare and contrast students’ present experiences with personal, institutional and cultural structures, assumptions and norms with the perspectives introduced in the literature. Students explore views that are grounded in body, mind, emotion and spirit with the goal of clarifying and enhancing their own critical processes. The course involves structured experience, imagery, discussion, reading, writing and creative expression.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 139 - Hiking


    This course is intended to give students the opportunity to use environmental opportunities offered by their area for the purpose of improved fitness and stress reduction. Students will prepare for and complete with the class a day hike; students will then plan and complete an additional day hike at a site of their own choice.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 140 - Theories of Counseling


    This course examines the different theories of psychotherapy and how these theories affect counselors and their clients.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 141 - Computer Literacy


    This course will familiarize the student with basic concepts needed to purchase and make effective use of microcomputers. Differences in computer architecture will be explored from a user rather than a technical perspective, and students will explore a wide range of applications in order to understand how a computer can contribute to the effectiveness of an organization or group.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 142 - Law and Legal Advocacy


    This course familiarizes students with the history and structure of the United States legal system on the federal, state and local levels with particular reference to issues of case advocacy and class advocacy.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 143 - Contemporary American Literature


    This course examines literature dealing primarily with the social issues contemporaneous with various authors. The content is diverse, reflecting gender, race, class and cultural issues.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 146 - Writing Skills


    This course helps students improve their writing skills as they engage in various forms of writing for social change. Through formal research, oral presentation and text-based analysis, students learn the fundamentals of journalistic documentation, journalistic advocacy, theory and proposal writing, and speech writing.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 147 - Academic Skills


    Utilizing substantive human resource development materials, this course develops the linguistic and academic skills useful for advanced academic study. These skills may be classified as receptive skills, productive skills and study skills.

    Credits: 3








 

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