Nov 28, 2022  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Sport Management and Recreation

  
  •  

    SMRT 475 - Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation


    This course offers an examination of general legal concepts, federal and state legislation, and legal liabilities as they impact the recreation and the sports profession. It is designed to assist administrators and supervisors to anticipate and cope with potential litigation.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 478 - Management of Financial Resources


    This course focuses on the nature and concerns of sport and recreation professionals as they prepare and defend operating and capital budgets. Topics will include the preparation of financial plans, strategic budgeting, organizational structure, collaborative efforts, and other methods used to fund and support facility operations.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 482 - Seminar and Problem Solving


    The undergraduate seminar is a capstone course in which students explore and develop strategies for utilizing Humanics to address current issues and trends in the field. The course will culminate in students’ presenting the major issues and trends in a public forum to professionals in the field.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 483 - Seminar: Business and Professionalism in Sport


    This course is designed too provide sport management students with a capstone class synthesizing the important concepts necessary for sport management professionals. Students will demonstrate high-level critical thinking, understanding of management and business principles in sport, professionalism and leadership through research and class discussion.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 485 - Undergraduate Internship


    This internship provides practice, under professional supervision, in a variety of recreation and leisure service agencies. Assignment of internship is based upon the student’s choice of professional career. Students complete 45 hours of internship work per registered credit and complete all the projects required in the internship handbook.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    A minimum of 90 semester hours of coursework and a minimum GPA of 2.50.



    Credits: 3-12








  
  
  •  

    SMRT 498 - Golf Course Management


    This course provides a detailed analysis of golf course operations and administration.  
    Topics include staffing, equipment, pro shop operations, landscape operations, tee and greens construction, computerized irrigation and global positioning systems.  Upon completion, students should be able to understand the complicated roles and        
    functions of golf course operations.  

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 560 - Professional Trends and Issues in Therapeutic Recreation


    This course is designed to facilitate students’ understanding of the current trends and issues in the field of Therapeutic Recreation.  Through service-learning projects and seminar style discussion, students examine topics including, but not limited to, professional and healthcare ethics; legislation and government regulations; standards of practice and professional competencies; multicultural and international recreation; inclusion practices; and evidence based practice.  A significant focus is placed on clinical trends and issues.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 574 - Child Life Concepts and Theories in Working with the Hospitalized Child


    This course is designed to introduce the field of child life by focusing on its evolution and modern-day concepts, as well as theories related specifically to its implementation in a health care setting. Concepts include child life in a health care setting, the effects of hospitalization on children, the role of recreation/ play in a hospital setting, design of a play area, and working with children and families under stress.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 574 - Child Life Concepts and Theories in Working with the Hospitalized Child


    This course is designed to introduce the field of child life by focusing on its evolution and modern day concepts, as well as theories related specifically to its implementation in a health care setting. Concepts include: child life in a health care setting, the effects of hospitalization on children, the role of recreation/play in a hospital setting, design of a play area, and working with children and families under stress.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 272 or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 576 - Child Life Clinical Issues and Techniques


    This course is designed to provide an overview of clinical issues and practical techniques related to the delivery of child life services and the specialized needs of hospitalized children, adolescents, and their families.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 272 - Inclusive Recreation Services  

     



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 576 - Child Life: Clinical Issues and Techniques


    This course is designed to provide an overview of clinical issues and practical techniques related to the delivery of child life services and the specialized needs of hospitalized children, adolescents, and their families.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 272





    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 578 - Applied Principles in Child Life and Family Centered Care


    This course is designed to facilitate students’ understanding of the practical application of Child Life and Family-Centered-Care principles.  Through experiential activities and seminar style discussion, students practice various application skills used by Child Life Specialists including (but not limited to) assessment, building supportive relationships, pre-procedural teaching, procedural support and distraction, pain management interventions, death and associated interventions, and sibling support.  A significant focus is placed on the role of play for the hospitalized child and the role of the Chld Life Specialist during bereavement situations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 574 - Child Life Concepts and Theories in Working with the Hospitalized Child  

    and

    SMRT 576 - Child Life Clinical Issues and Techniques  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 578 - Applied Principles in Child Life and Family Centered Care


    This course is designed to facilitate students’ understanding of the practical application of Child Life and Family-Centered-Care principles. Through experiential activities and seminar style discussion, students practice various application skills used by Child Life Specialists including (but not limited to) assessment, building supportive relationships, pre-procedural teaching, procedural support and distraction, pain management interventions, death and associated interventions, and sibling support. A significant focus is placed on the role of play for the hospitalized child and the role of the Child Life Specialist during bereavement situations.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 611 - Therapeutic Recreation Management Practices


    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the management and development of community based therapeutic recreation service. Emphasis is placed on legislation, community based protocols, inclusion, rights, and needs of persons with disabilities for therapeutic recreation service. A practical professional field assignment/project is required.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 613 - Seminar in Sport and Recreation


    This course examines the research of relevant issues associated with industries, organizations and populations in sport management and recreation.  Students will explore the concepts developed in relevant literature as they apply to sport management and recreation.  Students are exposed to a variety of research methods and techniques used in sport management and recreation research.  Additionally, students will analyze and synthesize research data and apply their findings to resolving the identified issues.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 623 - Social Issues and Policy in Sport Organizations


    This course examines major social and ethical theories and their relationship to  
    the study of sport in the 21st century.  Current issues in sport will be identified  
    and analyzed, including ethical dilemmas, social stratification and mobility,         
    commercialization, ethnics and gender barriers and political influences.          
    Additionally, this course will provide students with an understanding of the role of
    governance (and policy making) in sport, from both a national and international perspective.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 630 - Strategic Leadership Seminar in Sport


    This course explores the importance of leadership and strategic practices as a process of effective sport and recreation organizations. It examines the theoretical and practical aspects of leadership primarily at the executive and director level, and leadership through the concept of strategic organizational planning. The course is designed to explore the distinctions between management and leadership in the organization, and designed to provide the problem-solving skills necessary to develop successful strategy for all forms of sport and recreation organizations.  Students will understand the strategic skills necessary to evolve from manager to leader in the fields of sport and recreation.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 640 - Advanced Therapeutic Recreation Processes and Techniques


    Through instruction, observation, and practice, students will gain an advanced understanding of the varying roles of the therapeutic recreation specialist. In the class/laboratory settings, students will identify and apply the principles of planning, leading, and evaluating therapeutic intervention techniques used in the therapeutic recreation process for individuals with disabilities across the lifespan.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 642 - Event Management in Sport and Recreation


    Students will be responsible for planning,marketing, implementing, and evaluating major events. Components of this course willinclude developing sponsorships, developingtactics for event management operations,sales and selling for aspects of clientrelations, media relations, and the development of other related documentsincluding, but not limited to, a riskmanagement plan, a financial plan, and other factors pertinent to global and small scaleevent planning and management.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 643 - Branding: Marketing Strategies for Reputation Management


    This course provides the student with a basic theoretical and practical knowledge of managing the reputation of a sport and recreation organization. Branding, Public Relations, Marketing and Customer Service will also be examined within the context of branding. Special attention is given to market segmentation, research, customer service, and understanding and experiencing the process of constructing, implementing, and evaluating a brand management plan. Primary concepts include: the utilization of public relations tools, sponsorship proposals, selling and developing service delivery systems.

    Credits: 3








  
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    SMRT 650 - Advanced Therapeutic Recreation Programming


    This course will introduce students to a high level of planning, assessment, implementation and evaluation of therapeutic recreation services. Special attention will be placed on principles and practices of therapeutic recreation programming for individuals with multiple disabilities. Focus is on the social, interpersonal, and behavioral aspects of working with children and young adults with disabilities in recreational environments.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 660 - Effective Therapeutic Recreation Administration


    Students acquire knowledge of current principles and procedures for assuming an administrative role in the therapeutic recreation profession. Includes issues and practices related to supervision, reimbursement, quality improvement programs, consultation, marketing, and more.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 673 - Therapeutic Recreation Programming for Persons with Disabilities


    The course is designed to familiarize and prepare the student with the essential principles and elements involved in planning, organizing, conducting, supervising, and promoting therapeutic recreation programs. General modifications and adaptations necessary in facilities, equipment, and program design are examined for persons with intellectual disabilities; physical, social, or emotional disabilities; learning disabilities; mental illness; chronic illness; and the older adult. Emphasis is placed on practical application in a variety of settings to better meet the needs, interests, and potential of persons with disabilities.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 675 - Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation


    This course offers an examination of general legal concepts, federal and state legislation, and legal liabilities as they impact the recreation and sport management profession. It is designed to assist administrators and supervisors to anticipate and cope with potential litigation.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 678 - Budgeting for Sport and Recreation


    This course focuses on the nature andconcerns of sport and recreationprofessionals as they prepare and defendoperating and capital budgets. Topics willinclude the preparation of financial plans,strategic budgeting, organizationalstructure, collaborative efforts, and othermethods used to fund and support facilityoperations.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 679 - Performance and Personnel Management for Sport


    This course explores management as a process of effective sport and recreation organizations. It examines the theoretical and practical aspects of management, performance management, and the management of resources throughout the organizational structure, from entry- to executive-level; across all managerial functions of recruiting, training, supervising and evaluating. Through classroom discussion, projects, and case studies. The course will preparing students for mid to upper level management jobs in sport and recreation. The course will examine contemporary organizational culture across all generations of employees and their unique implications, while introducing the evolution of a manager to strategic leader necessary to be successful in the fields of sport and recreation.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SMRT 685 - Graduate Internship


    Each student should plan on spending a minimum of twelve weeks in a field placement. This experience comprises a carefully designed program agreeable to all parties concerned: the student, the agency director, and the director of this major. Selection of location is consistent, if possible, with the student’s vocational goals.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Graduate standing in the sport management and recreation program

    and

    and

    A minimum of 18 semester hours of coursework and a minimum GPA of 3.00



    Credits: 6-Jan








  
  •  

    SMRT 686 - Clinical Practicum in Child Life


    The clinical practicum in child life is designed to provide child-life students with opportunities for observing, assisting, and utilizing child-life interventions in a clinical, child-life setting. Under professional supervision, this course is individually contracted to assist students in defining career options and qualifying for child-life certification.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3









Springfield College Humanics

  
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    SCHM 100 - Humanics Seminar


    The Humanics Seminar exposes first year students to the mission of Springfield College as it pertains to leadership, service and justice.  Students will engage in volunteer activities, leadership development and learning experiences designed to promote an understanding of one’s self in relation to the Humanics Philosophy.

    Credits: 1









Substance Use Disorder Counseling

  
  •  

    SUDC 251 - Special Topics


    This course provides an opportunity for students to do an in-depth analysis on specific human services topics. The analysis will include looking at the issues from historical and cultural perspectives. The issues reviewed are developed by the instructor in collaboration with the class.

    Credits: 1-3








  
  •  

    SUDC 270 - Substance Use Disorder and Intimate Partner Violence


    This course will review the nature and prevalence of substance use problems and its association with violence against partners and explain the interrelated issues of substance use and intimate partner violence. This course will illustrate anddescribe the similarities, differences and relationship between substance abuse and intimate partner violence.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 304 - Substance Use Disorder: Education and Prevention


    This course will focus on evidence-based practices in prevention education for substance use. The goals are to build knowledge and skills of prevention practices K-12 and young adults ages 18 to 25. Special emphasis will be placed on theoretical models, social norming research and the intersection of social group identity development as it relates to prevention and education programs. Prevention training models and research through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration, The Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention and the National Health Education Standards will be utilized to study the process of assessing, planning and implementing evidence-based prevention strategies.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 310 - Counseling Gamblers I


    This course is based on basic clinical elements and theories of counseling the problem gambler. Procedures and best practices introduced include the maintenance of record keeping and report writing, assessment and diagnosing. Introduction to the history, prevalance, social impact, and current significance will be investigated.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 327 - Social and Political Issues of Substance Use Disorder


    This course has been designed to study the social aspects, policy development, implementation, and economic forces in the field of addictions. The relationships between addiction service systems and local key organizations and institutions will beinvestigated. The roles of the substance abuse addictions professional will be clarified.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 330 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 1


    Group Project 1 providesthe opportunity fordirect involvement in a community-based action research project. Working in small groups, students develop group protocols and responsibilities. In partnership with members of the community, student groups work on understanding the strengths, challenges, and possibilities of the community while designing possible strategies to address community-identified issue(s). Student groups are responsible for submitting a formal research proposal for the work to be continued in Group Project 2 and 3.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    SUDC 331 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 2


    Group Project 2 focuses on implementation of the project by the students working collaboratively with the community-based organizations and individuals. Group responsibilities include data collection, preliminary analysis of data, and mobilization of available community networks, resources, and stakeholders toward actively addressing a community-identified issue(s). Groups are responsible for submitting an updated research paper for the work to be continued in Project 3.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ADST 330

    or

    Permalink

    or

    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    SUDC 332 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 3


    The third course in the Group Project sequence focuses on evaluation, documentation, and oral presentation of the group project. The course requires students to produce a written final report that assess the impact of the group project on the participants and the community. There is a formal group presentation of project findings to faculty and community partner(s).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ADST 331

    or

    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    SUDC 380 - Nature, Assessment, and Treatment of Food Addiction


    This course teaches about the nature, assessment and treatment for food addiction as a chemical dependency. Students will learn about the new field of food addiction. They will look at the scientific arguments for and against food as a substance use disorder. The course is designed to introduce a variety of assessment tools and to give practice in using them. Students explore several models of treatment appropriate to early-stage, middle stage, and late stage food addiction. This course will also examine specific existing programs to treat addiction and how to refer clients to them.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 385 - Public Health Policies for Obesity and Food Addiction


    The obesity epidemic in the United States and worldwide continues unabated despite major efforts in the public and private sector to establish effective health policies. This course introduces students to US government public health policies of adult obesity as well as other current thinking in this area. Students will also examine the implications of new science on food addiction as it pertains to public health policy. The course will examine ways in which the different but often co-occurring diseases of obesity, eating disorders and chemical dependency on food overlap and how they also may require different public health policies. Students will consider what can be done by individuals, families, schools, private business, the food industry and government.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 391 - Independent Study I


    Responding to changing currents in the field of human services, this course explores a topic of contemporary relevance. The course provides an introduction to the fundamental issues presented by the course topic.

    Credits: 1-3








  
  •  

    SUDC 410 - Counseling Gamblers II


    This course builds on the knowledge acquired from the Counseling Gamblers I course. Participants will focus on advanced clinical elements and theories of counseling the problem gambler. These elements include the application of evidence-based best practice clinical skills and strategies to assist the client and their families. The course also focuses on various recovery and relapse prevention models and strategies.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 417 - Addictions Counseling


    This course provides an opportunity to study addictions counseling concepts and skills such as assessment, intervention, treatment planning and implementation strategies with individual groups and families. Particular attention is given to recovery-oriented strategies. Throughout this course, the needs of special populations are examined.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 437 - Ethical, Legal and Professional Standards for Substance Use Disorder Counselors


    This course explores ethical and legal aspects and substance use disorder counseling. This course provides a foundation for the ethical practice of substance abuse disorder counseling focusing on such issues as ethical decision-making through an understanding of legal and ethical standards of practice for counselors including self-examination. Issues such as client rights, confidentiality, dual relationships, duty to warn, consent for treatment, and ethical consideration of special populations are reviewed. Licensing, federal, regional and state laws associated with mental health counseling and addictions will drive specific codes used within this course. Participants will examine the beliefs that will provide a foundation for the development of a professional approach to ethics, as well as expand the knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding ethical behavior and decisions.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    SUDC 486 - Internship


    The internship is a course of practical study through placement in a work experience in a community service agency with a focus in addictions studies. Acceptable internship settings provide the student with an opportunity to develop new skills or work with a new problem or population. Under close supervision, students acquire experience in providing direct service to consumers and learn how agencies function. Credit hours awarded will vary depending on hours of internship performed at the chosen agency.

    Credits: 3-12









Therapeutic Recreation

  
  •  

    TRCM 613 - Seminar in Therapeutic Recreation


    This course examines the research of relevant issues associated with industries, organizations and populations in therapeutic recreation.  

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    TREC 384 - Practicum in Therapeutic Recreation


    This course provides majors within the Department of Sport Management and Recreation with the opportunity to gain practical experience in their chosen area of emphasis. Students become familiar with the client population, the agency philosophy, programming approaches and general procedures. Students are required to complete a minimum of 120 clock hours of satisfactory work under the direct supervision of a qualified professional and to attend scheduled class meetings. Experiences will be shared, and solutions to problems discussed during these class meetings.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    TREC 485 - Internship in Therapeutic Recreation


    Internship in Therapeutic Recreation

    Credits: 3-12








  
  •  

    TREC 685 - Graduate Internship in Therapeutic Recreation Management


    Each student should plan on spending a minimum of twelve weeks in a field placement. This experience comprises a carefully designed program agreeable to all parties concerned: the student, the agency director, and the director of this major. Selection of location is consistent, if possible, with the student’s vocational goals.

    Credits: 9









Youth Development

  
  •  

    YDEV 101 - Introduction to Youth Development


    This course will provide an overview of youth development principles, contexts and practices, and will trace the evolution of the youth development field. Additionally, through contemplative practice, students will enhance their social and emotional competencies in working with youth. Students will gain a foundation in youth development while developing intrapersonal and interpersonal skills necessary to effectively handle challenging situations and to create positive learning environments and well-managed program sites.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    YDEV 180 - Organization and Management of Youth Programs


    This course provides students with an understanding of issues and techniques related to organization and management of youth programs.Students gain an understanding of the practices and contemporary challenges of planning in youth serving organizations.Topics include program planning; developing goals and objectives; program promotion; needs assessments; recruiting and retaining participants; recruiting, training, and supervising staff and volunteers; evaluating programs; risk management; budgeting; and facility management.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    YDEV 186 - Pre-Practicum and Seminar in Youth Development


    Students enrolled in this course are placedin a youth-serving agency in Springfield. Students are required to complete 30 hours of service, shadowing an agency administrator.In addition, students participate in a weekly seminar that provides a forum forcollaborative, critical inquiry based ontheir service experience.

    Credits: 1-2








  
  •  

    YDEV 270 - Youth Development Across Contexts


    The goal of Positive Youth Development is to develop multifacted programs that help youth grow into mature and successful adults. According to Ferguson (2007) PYD is an increasing popular policy, curricular, and programmatic approach that allows schools, youth servicing organizations, and community partners to infuse youth development principles throughout their programs, through various contexts. In this course, students explore these contexts through experiential and hands on learning. Through class work and relationships with community partners, students gain firsthand knowledge of positive youth development programs across various contexts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    YDEV 101 - Introduction to Youth Development 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    YDEV 330 - Programming for Diverse Youth Populations


    This course provides students with an understanding of issues and strategies related to programming for diverse youth populations. Students will develop a greater self-awareness and a deeper understanding of the complexities of ‘diversity’ as well as individual, cultural, and structural elements that constrain and promote program participation. In addition, students will identify approaches to engage and empower different groups of youth.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    YDEV 340 - Advanced Strategies in Youth Practice


    This course is designed to extend the knowledge and skills of youth development students through various strategies and techniques which can be utilized in youth development settings. In this course, students critically analyze the strengths, limitations, and potential applications of current strategies and theories of youth work. Examples include: Developmental Systems Theory, Ecological Systems Theory, Social Cognitive Theory, resiliency, protective factors, developmental assets, and more. Fieldwork sessions are devoted to hands on, practical application and assessment of the lecture concepts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    YDEV 101 - Introduction to Youth Development 

    YDEV 270 - Youth Development Across Contexts 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    YDEV 387 - Pre-Internship Seminar


    As the second part of a three-part internship series, students will prepare for their internships by developing skills and portfolio creation, interviewing, goal setting, project planning, and professional communication. Additionally, students will finalized or internship site in the project that they will undertake during the internship experience.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    YDEV 486 - Supervised Internship in Youth Development


    This course is an individually contracted, practical experience under professional supervision in a youth serving agency. It is intended to assist the student in exploring and confirming career goals, as well as to apply theory and methods outside of the classroom. Students engage in 45 clock hours of supervised internship per semester hour of credit.

    Credits: 2-12








  
  •  

    YDEV 492 - Researching and Evaluating Youth Programs


    This course develops students’ research andanalytical skills as we examinemethodological frameworks for planning andimplementing qualitative and quantitativesocial research and evaluation of youthprograms. Topics include: ethical issues;understanding research and evaluationreports; developing research and evaluationdesigns; constructing and implementing datacollection procedures; and methods ofanalyzing and sharing findings. Studentsdesign and implement their own outcomesevaluations of local youth programs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    At least three Youth Development and/or Sociology courses.



    Credits: 3









Organizational Leadership

  
  •  

    ORGL 671 - Ethical Leadership


    The course focuses on how leaders may utilize the principles and theories of ethics to enhance performance at the individual, group and organizational levels.  Participants reflect upon their own social background, culture and identity to better understand their own and others’ strengths and evolving approaches to leadership that enhance performance at the individual, group and organizational levels.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 673 - Organizational Planning and Performance Management


    This course focuses on the conceptual knowledge, technical skills, and critical leadership to develop and implement an effective strategic plan.  Understanding the connection between strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges within organizations as well as external environments forms the basis for successful priority setting.  The relationships between organizational planning and performance management will use evaluation models to assess program outcomes.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 674 - Cultural Competence Leadership


    Students develop an understanding of how culture, language, and geography influence communication.  Students utilize the knowledge to examine and deduce their intercultural competence.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 678 - Advocacy and Policy Analysis


    Policy formulation, policy analyses and advocacy are on the same continuum of skills necessary to lead human service organizations. Organizational leaders in the human service field need to understand the process of public policy making, its links to local, statewide and federal legislative processes. Advocates must understand how public policy is formulated, as well as having a clear grasp of the strategies to affect change. Such tactics involve determining specific advocacy activities, targeting and public education.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 680 - Negotiations and Conflict Management


    This course will present the concepts, processes, strategies, and ethical issues related to the role of power and accountability is explored as impllicit or explicit exceptations to justify beliefs, feelings, and actions to others. Students will learn how to better understand the theory, processes, and practices of negotion, conflict resolution, and relationship management so that you can be a more effective negotiator in a wide variety of situations.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 682 - Fiscal Analysis and Allocation


    This course focuses on the skills needed to operate an agency with multiple funding sources.  The course covers budget development, cash flow management, financial projections, and the use of financial tools to evaluate the fiscal health of an organization, and its equitable resource allocations. Students analyze the influences of local, state and federal govenment policies and regulations and learn the importance of sound fiscal policies.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 684 - Shaping Organizations and Change Management


    This course examines how leaders can promote the deliberate growth and development of their organizations via a change management process.  Students employ basic elements of organizational analysis, organizational behavior, organizational communications, organizational change including a systemic approach and application of knowledge, and organizational development.  Students will understand how organizational culture permeates all of these; and will be examined in relation to thier use by leaders to promote more effective, efficient, and social responsive organizations.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 686 - Social Entrepreneurship


    This course examines how organizations and individuals establish or develop a venture to address a social or environmental problem.  Students will learn the principles of social entrepreneurship.  Students will review case studies to identify how to assess opportunities and construct a plan for community engagement.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 688 - Crisis Management


    The focus of this course is on mitigating, coordinating and or sustaining contemporary issues, which incorporate the practical realities of leading across cultural differences and national boundaries (e.g., generational, gender, and regional).  The course examines the perspectives of individual identties and backgrounds, personal motivations, as well as political and social institutions that affect or create negative or sudden events.  A concentration on persuasive communication techniques, strategies and interventions are employed when one must choose to rely on influence as oppossed to formal authority.  The use of case studies is employed in the course.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 689 - Research Designs and Methods


    This course will examine both quantitative and qualitative methods for analyzing public policies and programs, with an emphasis placed on research strategies, designs, interpretation of results, and a number of basic statistical methods for public policy and survey research.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ORGL 690 - Graduate Capstone


    This course incorporates research methods for data collection, designs, interpretations of results, and a number of basic statistical methods to perform a comprehensive analaysis of an actual organizational issue.  The result is a client-based project or conference ready paper that develops appropriate methods to address said issue.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RSCH 610 - Foundations and Methods of Research  



    Credits: 3








 

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