Dec 09, 2022  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Occupational Therapy

  
  •  

    OCTH 592 - Individual Study in Occupational Therapy


    This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in individualized study with an occupational therapy faculty member. The student may explore particular academic or professional interests, beyond or within the requirements of the occupational therapy curriculum. The learning experience may include guided study in a particular professional specialty area, a small research project, or independent reading or writing on a topic related to the field. This course may be taken more than once.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Occupational therapy major and permission of instructor.



    Credits: 1-4








  
  •  

    OCTH 612 - Research Project Design


    Students prepare a written plan for a personal ‘program of research’ leading to a portfolio of scholarly work that will begin in this course and be completed in OCTH 626 Research Project over the next year. Course activities and assignments will demonstrate students’ emerging understanding of and competence in applying research knowledge and skills within the practice of occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RSCH 610 - Fundamentals and Methods of Research  



    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    OCTH 612 - Research Project Design


    Students prepare a written plan for a personal ‘program of research’ leading to a portfolio of scholarly work that will begin in this course and be completed in OCTH 626 Research Project over the next year. Course activities and assignments will demonstrate students’ emerging understanding of and competence in applying research knowledge and skills within the practice of occupational therapy.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    OCTH 626 - OT Research Project


    Students plan, organize, and implement a personal plan of scholarly activity under the supervision of an Occupational Therapy faculty member. Projects are submitted and presented in an approved form for retention by the Occupational Therapy Department. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 3 semester hours of OT Research Projects credits to fulfill the project requirements for the Master of Science degree in Occupational Therapy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 612 - Research Project Design  



    Credits: 1-3








  
  •  

    OCTH 626 - OT Research Project


    Students plan, organize, and implement a personal plan of scholarly activity under the supervision of an Occupational Therapy faculty member.  Projects are submitted and presented in an approved form for retention by the Occupational Therapy Department.  Students must successfully complete a minimum of 3 semester hours of OT Research Projects credits to fulfill the project requirements for the Master of Science degree in Occupational Therapy.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3-Jan








  
  
  •  

    OCTH 631 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults I


    This course is the first in a four-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults. This course specifically addresses clinical pathology, theory, and practice related to the physical domain of human occupation. Techniques for occupational therapy interventions, emphasizing a neurodevelopmental approach, are reviewed and practiced in laboratory experiences.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 632 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults II


    This is the second in a four-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults. This course specifically addresses the operational use of psychosocial occupational therapy theories within the context of traditional psychiatric theories. Occupational therapy interventions, emphasizing therapeutic use of self, engagement in activity, and psychosocial evaluations are practiced.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 501 - Occupational Therapy Fundamentals 

    and

    OCTH 505 - Group Process 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 632 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults II


    This is the second in a four-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults. This course specifically addresses the operational use of psychosocial occupational therapy theories within the context of traditional psychiatric theories. Occupational therapy interventions, emphasizing therapeutic use of self, engagement in activity, and psychosocial evaluations are practiced.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 633 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults III


    This is the third in a four-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults. This course specifically addresses clinical pathology, theory, and practice related to the physical domain of human occupation. Techniques for occupational therapy intervention, emphasizing biomechanic, rehabilitative, and human occupation approaches, are reviewed and practiced.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 631 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults I  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 633 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults III


    This is the third in a four-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults. This course specifically addresses clinical pathology, theory, and practice related to the physical domain of human occupation. Techniques for occupational therapy intervention, emphasizing biomechanic, rehabilitative, and human occupation approaches, are reviewed and practiced.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 634 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults IV


    This is the fourth in a four-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults. This course specifically addresses clinical pathology, theory, and practice related to the psychosocial domain of human occupation. Psychiatric diagnoses are explored, along with occupational therapy techniques for assessment and intervention. Students have the opportunity to experience group leadership roles in the community.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 632 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults II 



    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    OCTH 634 - Occupation, Dysfunction, and Adaptation in Adults IV


    This is the fourth in a four-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults. This course specifically addresses clinical pathology, theory, and practice related to the psychosocial domain of human occupation. Psychiatric diagnoses are explored, along with occupational therapy techniques for assessment and intervention. Students have the opportunity to experience group leadership roles in the community.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 4








  
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    OCTH 635 - Development and Adaptation for the Older Adults


    The age range of the older adult today is 40 plus years. Students learn of the variety of physical and psychosocial strengths andchallenges experienced by this population and the roles occupational therapists play infacilitation of healthy occupations. Students observe older adults in various communityarenas while they practice evaluation andtreatment planning for this population.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 635 - Development and OT Adaptation for the Older Adult


    The age range of the older adult today is 40 plus years. Students learn of the variety of physical and psychosocial strengths and challenges experienced by this population and the roles occupational therapists play in facilitation of healthy occupations. Students observe older adults in various community arenas while they practice evaluation and treatment planning for this population.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 501 - Occupational Therapy Fundamentals 



    Credits: 3








  
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    OCTH 636 - Occupational Therapy for the Older Adult


    Occupation based issues and occupational therapy treatment for the older adult are explored and applied to treatment planning and documentation practice. Students with previous experience and/or academic history related to older adults tailor this course with theprofessor to match their individual needs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor and OTRC



    Credits: 1-2








  
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    OCTH 636 - Occupational Therapy for the Older Adult


    Occupation based issues and occupationaltherapy treatment for the older adult areexplored and applied to treatment planning and documentation practice.Students with previous experience and/or academic history related to older adults tailor this course with the professor to match their individual needs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of professor and OTRC.



    Credits: 1-2








  
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    OCTH 637 - Occupation, Dysfunction and Adaptation in Adults V


    This is the fifth in a 5-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults.  This course specifically addresses clinical pathology, theory, and practice related to the physical domain of human occupation.  Techniques for occupational therapy intervention emphasizing advanced biomechanical and evidence based approached while applying occupation based models are reviews and practiced.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 637 - Occupation, Dysfunction and Adaptation in Adults V


    This is the fifth in a 5-course sequence that examines occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation in adults. This course specifically addresses clinical pathology, theory, and practice related to the physical domain of human occupation. Techniques for occupational therapy intervention emphasizing advanced biomechanical and evidence based approached while applying occupation based models are reviews and practiced.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
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    OCTH 683 - Professional Seminar III


    Students participate in a seminar designed to assist in the transition from the OT academic setting to full-time fieldwork. Students review AOTA and Springfield College O.T. department fieldwork policies and procedures, complete or update required training in clinical procedures (e.g. HIPAA, Universal Precautions, background checks), and discuss conceptual foundations of fieldwork education, problem solving strategies, and the student evaluation process.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 684 - Clinical Education II


    Students participate in an intensive full-time twelve-week (or the equivalent) field experience in an occupational therapy practice setting, supervised by a qualified, licensed occupational therapist. Students have the opportunity to master entry-level clinical skills of evaluation, treatment planning,, implementation and documentation. In these settings, students practice the application of occupational performance theories and clinical reasoning with a caseload of clients.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 683 - Professional Seminar III 

    and

    permission of instructor.



    Credits: 9








  
  •  

    OCTH 684 - Clinical Education II


    Students participate in an intensive full-time twelve-week (or the equivalent) field experience in an occupational therapy practice setting, supervised by a qualified, licensed occupational therapist.Students have the opportunity to master entry-level clinical skills of evaluation, treatment planning,implementation and documentation.In these settings, students practice the application of occupational performance theories and clinical reasoning with a caseload of clients.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and

    permission of instructor.



    Credits: 9








  
  •  

    OCTH 685 - Clinical Education III


    Students participate in a second intensive full-time twelve-week (or the equivalent) field experience in a different occupational therapy practice setting, supervised by a qualified, licensed occupational therapist. Students have the opportunity to master entry-level clinical skills of evaluation, treatment planning, implementation and documentation. In these settings, students practice the application of occupational performance theories and clinical reasoning with a caseload of clients.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 683 - Professional Seminar III 

    and

    permission of instructor.



    Credits: 9








  
  •  

    OCTH 685 - Clinical Education III


    Students participate in a second intensive full-time twelve-week (or the equivalent) field experience in a different occupational therapy practice setting, supervised by a qualified, licensed occupational therapist.Students have the opportunity to master entry-level clinical skills of evaluation, treatment planning,implementation and documentation.In these settings, students practice the application of occupational performance theories and clinical reasoning with a caseload of clients.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and

    permission of instructor.



    Credits: 9








  
  •  

    OCTH 686 - Specialty Clinical Education


    This optional fieldwork goes beyond the traditional requirement and offers students the opportunity to explore and perfect occupational therapy skills in a specialty area of practice. It is designed to strengthen students’ skills in a specialty area which demands refined expertise.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor. Fee.



    Credits: 0








  
  •  

    OCTH 687 - Professional Seminar IV


    Students participate in a seminar designed to assist in the transition from fieldwork to career. Students discuss fieldwork successes and challenges and how that has and will influence their career goals and strategies. Students learn about and prepare for national certification, state licensure, and other policies and procedures related to entering the profession.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 684 - Clinical Education II  



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 687 - Professional Seminar IV


    Students participate in a seminar designed to assist in the transition from fieldwork to career. Students discuss fieldwork successes and challenges and how that has and will influence their career goals and strategies. Students learn about and prepare for national certification, state licensure, and other policies and procedures related to entering the profession.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 1









Organization Management and Leadership

  
  •  

    MOML 604 - Graduate Project IV


    In this, the last course in the graduate project sequence, students will complete all data collection and synthesize the results of their study. This synthesis is presented in both a final research paper and oral presentation to faculty, students, interested community members, and other stakeholders.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOML 610 - Foundations of Research


    This course introduces the graduate student to the fundamentals of research. It is intended to teach the graduate student the formal, systematic application of the
    scientific and disciplined inquiry approach to the study of problems, resulting in the student learning how to distinguish between qualitative and quantitative research,
    including the various methodologies appropriate for each type of research work.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 625 - Leadership: A Lifelong Journey


    Participants explore historical and contemporary models of leadership and management and compare them to their own assumptions and experience within a context of unequal power relations and ongoing struggles for social justice. Participants reflect upon their own social background, culture and identity to better understand their own, and others’, strengths and evolving approaches to leadership and change. Participants assess their own purposes, values, capacities and challenges to guide their journey through the program and beyond.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 626 - Economics and Social Change


    The course content examines historical and contemporary perspectives regarding the causes and consequences of economic inequities within the United States of America and around the world, to include analysis of various ideologies and justifications that support existing political economies. Students have the opportunity to formulate their own ideas about what constitutes a just economic system, defend their theses regarding changes necessary to create such a system, and identify steps toward greater economic justice already being taken at local, national and/or international levels.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 628 - Building Multicultural Communities and Organizations


    This course examines cultural diversity in today’s environment based on such factors as race, gender, class stratification, age, ability status, religion, and sexual orientation. Students examine various approaches toward multiculturalism with the purpose of understanding the complexity and developing competency in its application to personal, organizational and community development.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 630 - Career Development and Social Change


    This course examines a number of aspects of career development as it relates to leadership. A perspective of the field of career development and major career theories is reviewed, as well as the effect of career choices on leadership development. Also examined are the influences of gender, ethnicity/culture, and special populations on an individual’s career growth, as well as the use of career development and career counseling as it relates to leadership in promoting social justice in both non-profit and for-profit organizations.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 650 - Special Project


    This course is designed for students who are involved in a research project that focuses on an area of particular interest or concern to them. It will provide an opportunity for students to develop their critical thinking skills as they explore a specific area of human services administration through a creative and flexible program. Supervision of this course will be through the student’s advisor. The student may also have an expert related to the selected area of study act in the capacity of project advisor. This, however, will be overseen by the student’s advisor. Students must write up a contract outlining maximum and minimum goals and outcomes to be realized at the end of this course and have it approved by their advisor.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOML 655 - Contradictions of Human Services Administration


    This is a review of the development of administrative specialization in the context of the history of human services agencies and the changing nature of the human services environment. Also, it examines different perspectives of management, leadership and authority; the contradictions between agency goals and personal careers; and the development of an ethic of humane, effective human services administration.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 657 - Strategic Planning


    This course focuses on the conceptual knowledge, technical skills, and critical leadership necessary to develop and implement an effective strategic plan. Understanding the connection between strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges within organizations as well as external environments forms the basis for successful priority-setting. The relationships between planning, implementation, and feedback systems are examined within the context of dynamic socio-economic, cultural and political forces. Students apply key principles to case studies as well as problem-posing sessions with human service organizations.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 658 - Planning and Implementation


    This course examines technical planning procedures, the actualities of planning and implementation and the problems of creating new programs and agencies.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 659 - Fiscal Management


    This course focuses on the skills needed to operate an agency with multiple funding sources. The course covers budget development, cash flow management, financial projections, annual reports/audits, grant applications and the use of financial tools to evaluate the fiscal health of an organization. Students analyze the influences of local, state and federal government policies and regulations and learn the importance of sound fiscal policies and grant management.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 660 - Management Information Systems in Human Services


    This course examines how to operate information systems that effectively monitor and control both fiscal and program information. It involves an introduction to computers, including electronic spreadsheets. The course’s central concern is the use of information systems to increase program effectiveness.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 661 - Organizational Change and Development


    This course examines how leaders can promote the deliberate growth and development of their organizations. Basic elements of organizational analysis, organizational behavior, organizational communications, and organizational development, with an understanding of how organizational culture permeates all of these, will be examined in relation to their use by leaders to promote more effective, efficient, and socially responsive organizations.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 662 - Staffing, Supervision, and Human Resource Management


    This course focuses on skills and knowledge necessary in staffing, supervising, and managing human resources in organizations. Emphasis is on supervisor’s understanding the relationship of human resources as a strategic partner while identifying, and responding to, training needs, selecting, evaluating, motivating,promoting, compensating and terminating of staff.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 666 - Power and Accountability


    This class examines relationships with boards, founders, politicians, businesses, other agencies and communities. It looks at how to develop power as a resource, how to use power to develop other resources, the accumulation of power through coalition building and the accountability of power.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 667 - Program Evaluation


    This course in program evaluation exposes students to current concepts, models and strategies used to evaluate human services programs. The primary focus of this course will be on the use of evaluation models used in qualitative evaluations. Students will focus on contemporary theorists and evaluate the extent to which assessment models can be used to appraise program outcomes.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 668 - Ethical Competence in Management and Leadership


    This course explores what makes for ethical competence in decision-making, policy-making and ensuring rights and benefits for clients and staff. How hierarchical arrangements, current laws, and one’s understanding ofprofessionalism promote and/or inhibit ethical choices are examined. Ethical dilemmas faced by leaders and their impact on the organization and broader community are investigated through case studies and critical thinking dialogue.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 669 - Board Development for Nonprofit Organizations


    This course will examine the various practical methods for building an effective Board of Directors and ways to utilize that Board to strengthen the operation of the non-profit organization. Issues such as recruitment of Board members, duties and responsibilities of Board members, and the relationship between the Board and organizational members will be discussed.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 672 - Clinical Issues in Criminal Justice


    This course investigates major clinical issues confronting current criminal justice administrators. Problems examined include mental illness and criminal behavior, post-traumatic stress disorder and crime, managing the legally insane, commitment processes, rights of the incarcerated and humane treatment of juvenile and adult offenders.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 675 - Grantwriting


    This course helps participants understand the processes of grantwriting and fundraising, including how to conduct research on funding sources and program development.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 676 - Conflict in the Workplace


    This course prepares students to address conflict in the workplace by providing an opportunity to first analyze conflict and then develop individual and organizational strategies for addressing it. Students draw on insights and other courses and real life experiences. Self-reflective exercises and interactive, experiential learning activities are used to develop analytical and practical skills for understanding and addressing conflict.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOML 677 - Marketing and Public Relations for Nonprofit Organizations


    This course introduces basic knowledge and understanding of strategic marketing and public relations for nonprofit organizations. Case studies are used to illustrate how nonprofit organizations effectively communicate with the client and the general public in order to build awareness, manage their public image and achieve their mission.

    Credits: 2









Philosophy

  
  •  

    PHIL 103 - Conflict of Ideals


    This course explores the major philosophical thinkers and value systems that have influenced twentieth century thought. Students are encouraged to explore and expand their own value systems using the tools of philosophical inquiry.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHIL 105 - Introduction to Philosophy


    This course studies representative thinkers in the major areas of philosophy, with emphasis on how philosophical ideas and methodologies can help us understand the contemporary world and our everyday lives.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHIL 106 - Ethics


    This course applies the study of ethical theories, value systems, and models of power and oppression to everyday life, community concerns, workplace practices and global issues for the purpose of promoting social justice and the Humanics philosophy of “leadership in service to humanity.”

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHIL 108 - Logic


    This course introduces students to the basics of critical thinking in the context of everyday discourse, including the structure of argument, major types of argument, criteria for evaluation of argument, common fallacies of reasoning, and the mechanics of writing an argumentative essay.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHIL 110 - Environmental Ethics


    Environmental Ethics provides an introduction to the ethical issues that arise in connection with environmental problems. The course studies evironmental harms as they relate to issues including sustainable individual behavior, environmental justice, non-human animal welfare, and the value of biodiversity and natural ecosystems. The primary focus of this course is a systematic, philosophical investigation of the ethical significance of the changes our society brings upon the environment.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHIL 120 - Philosophy of Sport


    Philosophy of Sport provides an introduction to metaphysical, aesthetic, and ethical issues in sport.  The course applies philosophical methods to answer fundamental questions about sport’s nature and value.  Students explore and expand their own ideas of the meaning of sport in their lives using the tools of philosophical inquiry.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHIL 222 - Africana Philosophy


    This course explores African and African-American cultures and philosophies, including such topics as human nature; mind, body, and personhood; politics and society; ethics, law, and crime; knowledge and truth; colonialism and postcolonialism; race and racism; gender; and slavery.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHIL 288 - Special Topics in Philosophy


    Responding to changing currents in the field of philosophy, this course explores a topic of contemporary relevance.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHIL 380 - Existentialism


    The course is an examination of those philosophers who stand within the existentialist tradition. It explores such subjects as objective and existential truth, inauthentic and authentic existence, death, and freedom.

    Credits: 3









Physical Education

  
  •  

    PHED 102 - Instructional Strategies in Physical Education


    This course introduces students to generic teaching strategies, techniques, and safety issues in physical education. Lecture sessions focus upon conceptual foundations of teaching. Laboratory sessions are devoted to practical applications of lecture concepts in school based laboratory settings.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 104 - Instructional Strategies in Physical Education-Lab


    Lab component of PHED 102

    Credits: 0








  
  •  

    PHED 212 - Principles and Problems of Coaching


    This course highlights the role of the coach and the coach’s application of selected concepts and principles from psychology, sociology, and physiology toward the development of the individual and team for athletic competition in schools and colleges. Special attention is given to an awareness and understanding of the problems associated with motivation and emotion in sport; legal liability; the learning and improvement of motor skills; daily, weekly, and seasonal planning; training and conditioning methods; and the integration of the whole individual and team in preparation for contests.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    PHED 231 - Challenge Course Facilitator


    This course is a practical application course that teaches how to plan, implement, and  evaluate adventure education experiences for groups in a ropes course setting. Students have the opportunity for supervised practical experience within a group leadership environment. Instruction utilizes the ropes course as a tool for working with groups. Topics such as experiential education, adventure education, group dynamics, leadership styles, equipment, and safety methods are also stressed.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 236 - Elementary Physical Education Methods and Pre-Practicum: Grades K-2


    This one-half semester course is designed to help second-year physical education teacherpreparation students further theirpedagogical content knowledge and tointroduce principles of curriculumdevelopment and liability issues for gradespre-K through 12. Students applydevelopmentally appropriate practices inschool-based laboratory settings. Module 1 is dedicated to preparation for teaching pre-K - 2nd grade students. Students must earn a C or better in PHED 236 in order to matriculate.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHED 102 - Instructional Strategies in Physical Education 

    MOSK 140 - Skill Themes and Movement Concepts 

    and

    MOST 105 - Lifespan Motor Development 



    Credits: 1.5








  
  
  •  

    PHED 238 - Secondary Physical Education Methods and Pre-Practicum: Grades 6-8


    This one-half semester course is designed to help second-year physical education teacher preparation students further their pedagogical content knowledge and to introduce principles of curriculum development for grades pre-K through 12. Students apply developmentally appropriate practices in school-based laboratory settings. The primary focus of Module 3 is to introduce preservice teachers to appropriate practices for planning, teaching, and evaluating middle school (grades 6-8) physical education. The approach to teaching used in this course is based on nationally recognized appropriate physical education practices for middle school students. The information examined in module 3-Middle School Lecture will be reinforced and practiced in a 2-hour per week lab experience at a middle school teaching middle school students. In addition, students will have the opportunity to volunteer at the middle school and work with students in their academic classrooms as well. Instructional methods for this course will include various teaching styles and strategies of mini-discussion and lecture, guest presenters, small group work, jigsawing, and brainstorming.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHED 102 - Instructional Strategies in Physical Education  

    PEPC 240 - Target Games  

    PEPC 250 - Territorial/Invasion Games  

    PEPC 260 - Striking Games  

    PEPC 270 - Racket Sports: Net and Wall Games  



    Credits: 1.5








  
  •  

    PHED 239 - Secondary Physical Education Methods and Pre-Practicum, Grades 9-12


    This one-half semester course is designed to help second-year physical education teacher preparation students further their pedagogical content knowledge and to introduce principles of curriculum development for liability issues for grades 9 through 12. Students apply developmentally appropriate practices in school-based laboratory settings. The primary focus of Module 4/High School Physical Education is to introduce appropriate practices for planning, teaching and evaluating high school physical education. The approach to teaching used in this course is based on nationally recognized appropriate physical education practices for high school students. The information examined in module 4-high school lecture will be reinforced and practiced in a 2-hour per week lab experience at a high school site teaching students. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHED 102 - Instructional Strategies in Physical Education  

    PEPC 240 - Target Games  

    PEPC 250 - Territorial/Invasion Games  

    PEPC 260 - Striking Games  

    PEPC 270 - Racket Sports: Net and Wall Games  



    Credits: 1.5








  
  
  •  

    PHED 309 - Adapted Physical Education Programming-Lab


    Lab component of PHED 308

    Credits: 0








  
  •  

    PHED 311 - Coaching and Officiating Baseball


    This course provides students with a basic understanding of the variables associated with the coaching of baseball on all levels. The major emphasis is on providing students with team strategy, fundamentals, and technical skills necessary to assist them in administering a successful baseball program. Two semester hours are allocated to the coaching aspects of the sport, while one semester hour is allocated to offensive and defensive fundamentals and technical skills.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 314 - Coaching and Officiating Football


    Coaching and Officiating introduces students to current techniques, basic concepts, management, and methods of coaching football as they apply to both the secondary and collegiate level.  Included is an analysis of the offensive, defensive, and kicking games to help the students determine appropriate coaching strategies.  In addition, principles of coaching philosophies, recruiting, eligibility, public relations, player-coach relationships, legal issues, and other organizational factors are implemented in this course.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 317 - Coaching and Officiating Basketball


    This course emphasizes the methods of teaching and coaching basketball, with an analysis of specific offenses and defenses. A definite plan of offense and defense is presented.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 319 - Coaching and Officiating Softball


    Techniques and materials for coaching softball at the secondary school and college levels are presented. Emphasis is also placed on the philosophy and psychology of varsity coaching, conditioning, and team strategy.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 321 - Coaching and Officiating Track and Field


    This course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills to successfully coach track and field at the high school and collegiate levels, and also achieve certification as a Western Massachusetts Track and Field Official.  This course provides the students an opportunity for the study of problems, methods of training, progressive drills used to learn the events and the various techniques in common use today.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 322 - Coaching and Officiating Volleyball


    This course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills to successfully coach volleyball at the high school and collegiate levels, and to be prepared to complete certification to officiate high school volleyball matches.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 323 - Coaching and Officiating Wrestling


    Course material covers the essential techniques of wrestling, the development of a team, conditioning, conduct of practice sessions, weight reduction, and preparation of a team for meets and tournaments.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 326 - Coaching Swimming and Diving


    This is a systematic treatment of the philosophy, principles, and techniques of teaching and coaching competitive swimming and diving.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 330 - Coaching Youth Sports


    Coaching Youth Sports

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 337 - Coaching and Officiating Field Hockey


    This course is designed to introduce the skills, strategies, and rules of the sport of field hockey in order to successfully coach at the high school or collegiate level. Topics to be covered in the course include: coaching philosophies, game strategies, coaching styles, practice planning, and other various issues associated with coaching field hockey. Students will also be prepared to become a high school field hockey official should they desire to pursue that option. 

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 338 - Coaching and Officiating Soccer


    This course emphasizes the analysis and teaching of individual skills and team play. Various types of offense and defense are presented. The course also includes strategy and the function of the coach and his/her opportunity as an educator.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    PHED 344 - Athletic Administration


    This course prepares students to organize and administer a program of intramural and interscholastic sports at both the public school and college levels. Consideration is given to the problems and standards associated with such programs.

    Credits: 2








  
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    PHED 346 - Pre-Practicum-Elementary Level


    This pre-practicum provides prospective physical education teachers with opportunities for observing, assisting, and teaching physical education in the elementary school setting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Matriculated status and student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.



    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    PHED 347 - Pre-Practicum-Secondary Level


    This pre-practicum provides prospective physical education teachers with opportunities for observing, assisting, and teaching physical education in the secondary school setting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Matriculated status and student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.



    Credits: 2








  
  
  •  

    PHED 349 - Coaching Practicum


    This pre-practicum provides prospective coaches with an opportunity to assist in the coaching of interscholastic competitive athletics in grades 7-12.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHED 212 - Principles and Problems of Coaching  or concurrent registration.



    Credits: 2








  
  
  
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    PHED 423 - Organization and Administration of Intramurals


    This course analyzes the total aspects of organizing and administering an intramural sports program on the high school, junior college, and college/ university levels. Leadership qualities, financing, publicizing, liabilities, tournament preparation, equipment, motivational aspects, and the role of coeducational activities are among some of the topics discussed.

    Credits: 2








  
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    PHED 484 - Physical Education (PreK-8) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach elementary/middle school physical education under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours, depending on the number of registered credits. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as a Physical Education (PreK-8) teacher.  A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTELS.



    Credits: 4-12








  
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    PHED 485 - Physical Education (5-12) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach secondary physical education under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours, depending on the number of registered credits. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as a Physical Education (5-12) teacher. A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTELs.



    Credits: 4-12








  
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    PHED 505 - Sports Medicine for Athletic Administrators


    This course is designed to expose studentspursuant of a degree in athletic
    administration to major health issues andconcerns encountered in athletics. Specific
    attention is given to problematic areas andthe administrator’s role. Further, this
    course will aid the administrator in theirability to evaluate coaching practices and
    techniques making provisions for better care of the athlete.

    Credits: 2








  
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    PHED 608 - Programming in Adapted Physical Education


    This course provides basic information on disabling conditions and how to provide adapted physical education programs based upon individuals assessed needs. Laboratory sessions afford practical experience in screening and assessment; identification, selection, and prescription of appropriate exercise programs; and implementation of developmental activities, rhythmic activities, aquatics, and games.

    Prerequisites & Notes





    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 612 - Adapted Physical Education Assessment and Implementation


    This course is intended to provide application of testing and evaluation methods for the purpose of designing movement-based school programing for individuals with disabilities.  Opportunities will exist to evaluate, design, present, and implement adapted physical education programming.  The IEP process and delivery will be examined in depth in relation to testing, evaluation, and implementation.

    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 613 - Advanced Level Coaching: Methods and Issues


    In this course, graduate students examine the role and responsibilities of the coach in intercollegiate and elite athletics. Major topics include ethics, recruiting, staffing, practice design, and governing body regulations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Previous playing experience at the college level or previous coaching experience at the interscholastic level or above.



    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 615 - Experiential Education Programming


    This course is designed to teach students the foundations of experiential education and the applications across multiple settings including the out-of-doors, in school, sport and youth programming. Specific emphasis will be reviewing instructional models that promote experiential education through sport, physical activity and the outdoor contexts. Students will examine literature and theories to build a strong comprehension of the design principles and learning theories associated with experiential education. Topics will include, but are not limited to the following: positive youth development, community youth development, outcomes based curriculum design and leadership.

    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 620 - Philosophy of Sport


    The ethical, aesthetic, epistemological, axiological, and metaphysical dimensions of sport are studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Undergraduate course in philosophy.



    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 627 - Facility Design, Operation and Maintenance in Athletics


    Principles of the design, maintenance, and operation OD sport and recreation facilities are presented with specific focus on utilization by interscholastic and intercollegiate programs. The student will develop an increased awareness of the wide variety of disciplines necessary for renovation or construction, and effective administration of athletic and recreation venues. The student will be challenged to apply course content through active participation, site visits to newly constructed or renovated sites, research, and project development activities.

    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 629 - Curriculum Construction in Physical Education


    This course provides an opportunity for graduate students, especially those preparing themselves for administrative positions, to undertake a practical experience in physical education curriculum construction.

    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 633 - Athletic Administration


    The course is designed to prepare the graduate student to organize and administer an athletics program at the public / preparatory school and collegiate levels, or within an athletic conference, and to recognize the opportunities, challenges, and standards associated with each level. The functions of an athletic administrator (planning, organizing, leading, implementing, controlling, and evaluating) are introduced, and special emphasis is placed on recognizing the importance of a strong philosophical approach required to provide a positive and meaningful student-athlete experience.

    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 635 - Motor Development and Analysis


    This course is an examination and analysis of perceptual motor factors which affect cognitive, psychological, social, and physical development throughout the lifespan. Topics include prenatal development, patterns of growth and development, reflexes, information processing, gender differences, adult regression, and remediation programs.

    Credits: 3








  
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    PHED 636 - Elementary Physical Education Methods and Pre-Practicum: Grades K-2


    This one-half semester course is designed to help graduate-level physical education teacher preparation students further their pedagogical content knowledge and to introduce principles of curriculum development and liability issues for grades pre-K through 2.Students apply developmentally appropriate practices in school-based laboratory settings.

    Credits: 1.5








 

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