Dec 09, 2022  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MATH 335 - Discrete Mathematics II


    This course covers basic mathematical structures that are underlying patterns and schemes of the modern computer sciences. Topics include maps, relations, modulo arithmetic, inductions, strings, formal languages, trees, elementary combinatorics, recursive functions, switching circuits, graph theory, algorithms, groups, rings, and lattices.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 235 - Discrete Mathematics I  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MATH 382 - Mathematics Seminar


    This course addresses diverse areas of mathematics at the advanced level through problem solving and historical inquiry. Students are exposed to mathematical modeling based upon an integration of several areas of mathematics including algebra, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, trigonometry, discrete mathematics, differential and integral calculus, number theory, probability and statistics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of Instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MATH 386 - Field Experience in Mathematics and Computer Sciences


    This course provides students with a practical, off-campus experience in the mathematics and computer science areas within the scope of a professional environment. Placement and selection of students for this course require the consultation and approval of a faculty supervisor from the department and the department chair.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Departmental approval required.



    Credits: 2-10








  
  •  

    MATH 405 - Mathematical Analysis


    This course is an introductory analysis of mathematical concepts intended to aid       
    students in their transition to abstract mathematics.  Topics include: topologic set 
    theory, the real number system as a complete ordered field, sequences and series, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration culminating in the Fundamental  
    Theorem of Calculus.   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 220 - Calculus III  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MATH 415 - Abstract Algebra


    Topics in this course include group theory, unique factorization domains, elementary number theory, rings, ideals, and introductory field theory. Categories and functions are included, and the interrelatedness of various mathematical disciplines is emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 310 - Linear Algebra  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MATH 488 - Topics in Mathematics and Computer Sciences


    This course covers advanced and new topics in mathematical analysis and computer sciences, with emphasis on applications, theoretical and practical, that are not covered in other courses, but are of current interest and relevance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of Instructor.



    Credits: 3









Mental Health Counseling

  
  •  

    COUN 635 - Marriage, Family, and Couples Counseling


    This course is designed to allow students the opportunity to explore and gain skill in assessment and intervention practices with families. The course includes surveying current approaches to family, marriage and couple counseling with an emphasis on a systemic conceptual model of family functioning with culturally sensitive, therapeutic interventions.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 629 - Counseling Skills and Modalities


    This course provides an introduction and opportunity to practice basic counseling skills. It includes content in the following areas: the importance and role of self-awareness in the counseling process in a multicultural society; a review of the elements of an effective helping relationships and principles involved in establishing them; and knowledge and skills in the problem-solving process in counseling; and exposure to models of counseling that are consistent with current professional research and practice.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 637 - Psychological Testing and Assessment


    This course establishes an understanding of the basic elements of psychological testing. We will cover essential statistics for testing and test score interpretation, review methods of test construction and the concepts of reliability, validity and standardization, as well as discuss the advantages and disadvantages of psychological testing and how testing and test scores can be used as a tool to assist in treatment planning. Additionally, participants will be introduced to various psychological testing instruments.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 644 - Counseling in Community Settings


    The focus of this course is on the community level of policy and program planning, participation, prevention, and evaluation. This includes planning and executing crisis services, dealing with issues of housing and employment, developing community participation, encouraging self-help and support groups, and advocacy work.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 647 - Counseling Theories


    This course presents an introduction to the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy. Students learn the central constructs and methods of the theories as well as their limitations and practical implications. Emphasis is placed on the applicability of the approaches to work with diverse client populations.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 648 - Multicultural and Diversity Counseling


    This course addresses cultural diversity and its implications for counseling. It considers the psychological impact of factors such as gender, race, ethnicity and culture, religious preference, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, and physical challenges in a variety of counseling settings.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 667 - Research and Evaluation


    This course provides experience with a sequential framework of the research process, including groundwork, measurement, design, analysis, and interpretation. Included are types of research, basic statistics, research report development and implementation. Program evaluation and needs assessment are also discussed. Legal and ethical issues are considered. Students will be introduced to the principles of the Institution Review Board process.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 681 - Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum/Internship I


    This course consists of 100 hours of supervised practicum and 150 hours of supervised internship consisting of applied experience in a mental health counseling setting and provides opportunity for practical application of skills, concepts, and theories of counseling learned in previous coursework. The student is exposed to the workings of a community agency that provides counseling services and develops skills in interviewing, assessment, and counseling. A group supervision class accompanies the internship.



    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 682 - Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship II


    This supervised internship consists of 250 hours of applied experience in a mental health counseling setting and provides opportunity for practical application of skills, concepts, and theories of counseling learned in previous coursework. The student is exposed to the workings of a community agency that provides counseling services and develops skills in interviewing, assessment, and counseling. A group supervision class accompanies the internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 682 - Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship II


    This supervised internship consists of 250 hours of applied experience in a mental health counseling setting and provides opportunity for practical application of skills, concepts, and theories of counseling learned in previous coursework. The student is exposed to the workings of a community agency that provides counseling services and develops skills in interviewing, assessment, and counseling. A group supervision class accompanies the internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 683 - Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship III


    This supervised internship consists of 250 hours of applied experience in a mental health counseling setting and provides opportunity for practical application of skills, concepts, and theories of counseling learned in previous coursework. The student is exposed to the workings of a community agency that provides counseling services and develops skills in interviewing, assessment, and counseling. A group supervision class accompanies the internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MMHC 684 - Mental Health Counseling Internship IV


    This supervised internship consists of 250 hours of applied experience in a mental health counseling setting and provides opportunity for practical application of skills, concepts, and theories of counseling learned in previous coursework. The student is exposed to the workings of a community agency that provides counseling services and develops skills in interviewing, assessment, and counseling. A group supervision class accompanies the internship.



    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3









Movement and Sports Studies

  
  •  

    MOST 105 - Lifespan Motor Development


    This is an introductory survey course in motor and perceptual development throughout the lifespan. Upon successful completion of the course, students are able to trace the path of human perceptual-motor development and to discuss the implications of general principles of motor development for the movement and sport specialist.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOST 224 - Motor Learning and Skill Acquisition


    This course investigates principles of human performance and the acquisition of motor skills. Attention is principally devoted to learning theories, reinforcement, transfer, massed and distributed practice schedules, closed and open skills, motivation, feedback, arousal, motor control systems, and retention of motor skills. Recent research evidence is presented in all topic areas.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MOST 105 - Lifespan Motor Development  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOST 230 - Land Based Outdoor Skills and Teaching Methods


    This course is designed to teach students how to execute the required skills necessary to plan, design, implement and evaluate land-based outdoor skills activities for a variety of populations. Topics will include, but are not limited to the following: experiential education, technical skill development, group dynamics, leadership styles, teaching models, current trends and issues, and risk management skills. Skill development for the following activities will be addressed throughout the semester: rock climbing, hiking and backpacking, mountain biking, and orienteering.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOST 240 - Water Based Outdoor Skills and Teaching Methods


    This course is designed to teach students how to execute the required skills necessary to plan, design, implement and evaluate water-based outdoor skills activities for a variety of populations. Topics will include, but are not limited to the following: experiential education, technical skill development, group dynamics, leadership styles, teaching models, current trends and issues, and risk management skills. Skill development for the following activities will be dressed throughout the semester: flatwater paddling for canoeing and kayaking and moving water paddling for canoeing and kayaking.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    MOST 328 - Psychology of Sport


    This is an introductory course designed to provide information and facilitate understanding in regard to individual sport behavior. The emphasis is on the psychological constructs and concepts that relate to and help explain the phenomena of sport performance.

    Credits: 3








  
  
  •  

    MOST 410 - Assessment in Movement and Sport


    This course is designed to present to the student various assessment tools in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains used in movement science and sport. An introduction to research in movement science and sport as well as basic statistical analysis are presented. A practical experience in administering a test, including the writing of an article suitable for a research journal, is involved.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOST 412 - Assessment in Movement and Sport-Lab


    Lab component of MOST 410

    Credits: 0








  
  •  

    MOST 428 - Sociology of Sport


    In this course, sociological concepts and theories are used to examine sport. This course is designed to acquaint students with the relationship between sport and the society in which it is embedded. A variety of issues and controversies in sport are identified and discussed.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOST 429 - Heritage and Values of Movement and Sport


    This course is designed to teach students about the cultural heritage and values of human movement and sport, from a philosophical and historical perspective. A close examination is made of important time periods of the past that affect current attitudes, understanding, knowledge, and behavior and guide students into the future.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOST 439 - Sociology and Heritage of Sport and Physical Education


    In this course, sociological concepts and theories are used to examine sport from a historical and philosophical perspective. This course is designed to acquaint students with the cultural heritage and values of human movement and the relationship between sport and the society in which it is embedded.  A variety of issues and controversies in sport are identified and discussed.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOST 484 - Practicum in Movement Studies


    This practicum in movement and sport studies provides students with an opportunity to observe and assist professionals in their area of specialization. In the practicum, the student assumes increasing responsibility for work and projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Registration limited to students in the MOST major.



    Credits: 1-12









Movement and Sports Studies Activity Courses

  
  •  

    MOSK 101 - Outdoor Pursuits


    This is a seven-day experience in outdoor living that allows the pursuit of outdoor activities and enhances students’ understanding and appreciation of individual differences of the social aspects of group living. Students engage in activities selected to increase environmental awareness, improve outdoor living skills, and serve as an introduction to resource-based pursuits.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MOSK 140 - Skill Themes and Movement Concepts


    This course is designed to provide a framework for understanding the interaction between movement concepts and skill themes.  Participation in this course will provide opportunities for the pre-service teacher to develop pedagogical content knowledge of the movement framework.  Students will learn how movement concepts enhance, expand, and embellish skill themes.

    Credits: .5








  
  •  

    MOST 206 - Physics for Movement Science Laboratory


    This course is designed to introduce Physical Education Major students to general 
    principles of physics involved in movement and gross motor skills.  Students will study 
    how fundamental gross motor skills are extensions of the principles of physics and  
    how this can enable students to recognize, teach and apply techniques which are common to sport and movement activities.  Students will relate and apply the concepts of physics to teaching K-12 physical education and coaching various sports.  This course will serve as the Lab experience for Physics 205 and will be taught by faculty from the Physics Department and the Physical Education department.  The settings will include the Physics lab and sport facilities.

    Credits: .5









Movement Studies

  
  •  

    MOST 624 - Motor Learning and Control


    This course is designed to present information concerning fundamental concepts in motor learning and control. Topics include stages of skill acquisition, neurological bases of movement, motor integration, feedback, motor memory, conditions of practice, attention, and perception. Laboratory sessions are designed to enhance the understanding of topics covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MOST 224



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MOST 629 - Heritage and Values of Movement and Sport


    This course is designed to teach students about the cultural heritage and values of human movement and sport from a philosophical and historical perspective. A close examination is made of important time periods of the past that have affected current attitudes, understanding, knowledge, and behavior.

    Credits: 3









Music

  
  •  

    MUSC 101 - Basic Musicianship


    This is an introductory course intended to develop fundamental knowledge of musical 
    elements and skills. Students in this course develop music reading and beginning 
    compositional skills through the study of rhythmic exercises, ear training, basic 
    theory, analysis and composition.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 102 - Music Theory I


    Students in this course develop skills in musical composition, related solfege, and related dictation. Notation, interval and chord construction, and harmonic rhythm are studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUSC 101 - Basic Musicianship  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 103 - Music Theory II


    This course is a continuation of MUSC 102. Modulation, dominant seventh chords, secondary dominants, ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords, melodic structure, and a musical texture are studied. Students continue the development of skills in composition, solfege, and dictation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUSC 102 - Music Theory I  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 108 - Music Appreciation


    This is an introduction to music from the Baroque to contemporary styles.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 112 - Springfield College Singers


    The mixed chorus performs varied styles of music. Major performances include holiday season and spring tour shows. Membership is open to all students who are able to meet the standards set by the group.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 4 semester hours.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MUSC 113 - Springfield College Band


    This course emphasizes the study and performance of transcriptions and original jazz compositions. Major performances include the holiday and spring concerts. The Springfield College Stage Band is open to all instrumentalists who are able to meet the standards set by the group.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 4 semester hours.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MUSC 114 - Springfield College Pep Band


    The Springfield College Pep Band performs at varsity sporting events, which include all home football and basketball games. Membership is open to all instrumentalists who are able to meet the standards set by the group.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 4 semester hours.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MUSC 115 - Chamber Music Workshop


    This workshop/ensemble emphasizes rehearsal and performance of music arranged for a classical chamber music format. Enrollment is open to all instrumentalists with basic reading and playing skills. Instrumentation and size of groups vary according to the instrumentalists available. Participants are coached on a stylistic approach, instrumental technique, and working effectively as an ensemble. Performances include the Springfield College Annual Music Concert, as well as a variety of other performances both on and off campus.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated up to a maximum of 4 semester hours.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MUSC 120 - Basic Piano


    This course is designed for students with no prior keyboard experience. Emphasis is on developing functional skills at the keyboard and the ability to interpret musical notation for the piano.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MUSC 121 - Basic Guitar


    This course is designed for students with no prior guitar experience. Emphasis is on developing functional skills on the guitar and the ability to interpret musical notation for the guitar. Instrument rentals are available.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MUSC 130 - Applied Music I


    Individual voice or instrument study with an approved private instructor is pursued by each student. Four semesters of study are required for music minors. The course is open to non-music minors who meet the minimum entrance standards. The course may be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 semester hours. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Lab fee required.  See Fiscal Facts.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MUSC 131 - Applied Music II


    Individual voice or instrument study with an approved private instructor is pursued by students who are already enrolled in MUSC 130 and who wish to study music skills in a second area. This course is pursued at the same time as MUSC 130 and, with the music department’s permission, may also be repeated for credit to a maximum of 8 semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Lab fee required.  See Fiscal Facts.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    MUSC 133 - Music Technology


    This course is an introduction to current music and audio technology tools for personal computers. This course provides an overview of computer music, audio tools, and terminology including MIDI, synthesis, sequencing, scoring, and direct-to-disk audio recording. Classes involve discussion of practical applications for this technology in multimedia productions such as video, CD-ROM, computer animation, and live performance, culminating in the preparation of recorded musical projects using a computer and synthesizer.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUSC 101 - Basic Musicianship  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 136 - American Popular Music


    This course explores the popular music of America, considering the influence of Native American, African American, Latino and European cultures and the resulting American musical styles such as Folk, Country, Blues, Zydeco, Cajun, Dixieland, Jazz, Salsa, Stage Musicals, Rhythm and Blues, Rock and Hip Hop.  It is designed for individuals who are interested in understanding the cross-currents and history of American Popular music and its influence in helping to shape the cultural identity of America.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 140 - Eclectic Music with Children


    This course introduces students to preschool, early childhood, and elementary music. Emphasis is placed on experiential discovery through movement, imagery, and vocal/instrumental activities to be found in the child’s musical environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUSC 101 - Basic Musicianship  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 141 - Eclectic Music with Special Populations


    This course introduces students to the use of music in recreation, leisure, rehabilitation, and therapeutic settings. Emphasis is placed upon experiencing procedures and materials to be used in prescriptive activities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUSC 101 - Basic Musicianship  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 150 - World Music


    Music symbolizes a culture’s way of life - for many people, music is a way of life.  This will be a survey of music and culture including Latin America, West and South     
    Africa, Native North America, India, Japan, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East.  Through a wide range of selected case studies, students will develop strategies for        
    understanding and listening to all kinds of music.  As a final project, students will carry out cultural fieldwork as a way to connect their learning to their own musical world.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MUSC 332 - Music as a Form of Social Protest


    This course surveys the music of those musicians who have been influential in focusing public attention on particular social causes. Students experience music through literature (books, journals, etc.), recording, and video.

    Credits: 3









Nutritional Science

  
  •  

    NUSC 101 - Introduction to Nutritional Sciences


    This course is designed to pride an introduction to careers in Nutritional Sciences, but not in dietetics.  Students will be exposed to career options and will learn about the non-dietetics track nutritional sciences program at Springfield College.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    NUSC 250 - Nutritional Assessment


    This course is designed to expose students to assessment techniques used in nutritional sciences.  Using both lecture and lab settings, students will gain experience in using nutrition analysis software, taking nutrition history, taking anthropometric measurements, and in biochemical assessment techniques used in nutritional sciences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition


    In this course students will discover how the body uses food by learning various functions of each key nutrient. An overview of digestion, absorption, and metabolism is provided. Food sources of the key nutrients and recommended intakes are explored in depth. The student’s own diet is evaluated, using a computerized diet analysis.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 300 - Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism


    This advanced nutrition course will expand upon material in Introduction to Nutrition (HLTH 261).  Specific focus will be on the roles of micro and macronutrients in metabolic pathways, responses to feeding and fasting, and disordered metabolism.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 310 - Principles of Food Science


    This introductory course will provide a broad background of food science including topics of food chemistry, food processing, food microbiology, food safety, food toxicology, biotechnology with food, and food product development.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC majors.

    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 315 - Food Composition and Preparation


    In this course, students learn the basics of food preparation, the scientific basis for changes that occur in food preparation and cooking, and gain insights into the effective recipe modifications on food characteristics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 320 - Community Nutrition


    This course is deigned to expose students to the sociological, political, and financial aspects of nutrition promotion within the community. Food security and public nutritional support systems locally and nationally will be covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC majors only.

    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 330 - Food Service Management


    Managing and leading food service or clinical organizations is explored. Students will learn skills related to human resources, menu planning, staffing, and leadership in the context of providing high-quality products to customers.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC majors only.

    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 340 - Nutrition and Culture


    In this course students will learn about food culture in societies across the world.  A specific focus will be placed on traditional methods of food preparation and consumption in daily life and during times of celebration.  Dietary patterns will be compared between societies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  

    or

    NUSC 300 - Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 361 - Applied Nutrition


    This course enables students to attain a better understanding of the dynamic relationship between nutrition and the human physiological process. This better prepares students to engage in preventive and management techniques as related to nutritional deficiencies and the human body.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    NUSC 410 - Nutrition and Human Development


    Nutritional needs and changes in metabolism throughout the lifecycle will be studied. Life stages including pregnancy and lactation, infancy, adolescence, adulthood, and older age will be included. The cultural and psychological influences on food will be discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NUSC majors only.

    NUSC 261 - Introduction to Nutrition  



    Credits: 3








  
  
  
  

Occupational Therapy

  
  •  

    OCTH 100 - Occupational Therapy Seminar I: Essentials for Academic and Professional Success


    This course assists the student’s transition into college academic and social life and introduces beginning professional skills.  Topics include setting goals,time management, critical thinking, test-taking strategies, and requirements for occupational therapy education and entry level skills.  Students engage in small group discussion and active learning in and outside the classroom to advance knowledge, skills and behavior in a supportive setting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSOT majors.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 101 - Survey of Occupational Therapy


    This course provides an opportunity to survey basic concepts, theories, settings, and practices of occupational therapy. The values of occupational therapy performance and activity in prevention, treatment, and health maintenance are addressed. Roles and responsibilities encountered by current occupational therapists are explored.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 284 - Occupational Therapy Practicum & Seminar II: Introduction to the OT Clinic


    This course is a clinical experiential course (45 hours) run simultaneously with a weekly two hour seminar. Students spend time in an occupational therapy setting in the community, observing evaluations, treatment and therapist-client interactions. The accompanying seminar offers an arena to share and discuss observations, clinical reasoning, and supervision issues. Additionally, the seminar is an opportunity to apply learning from their practicum and reading. Students may take this course more than once.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 101 - Survey of Occupational Therapy 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 335 - Client Occupations through Service Learning


    In small groups, students travel to area community agencies and help deliver services to people of varying ages, abilities, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Through preparatory and briefing seminars, journals, and service, students begin developing occupational therapy skills, such as: reasoning, therapeutic use of self, facilitating meaningful occupation, and the client/agency centered approach.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 101 - Survey of Occupational Therapy  

    and

    OCTH 284 - Occupational Therapy Practicum & Seminar II: Introduction to the OT Clinic  



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 384 - OT Practicum and Seminar III: OT Practice Framework


    This course combines clinical ans service learning experience along with a weekly seminar and preparatory work.Students spend time in anoccupational therapy setting in thecommunity, observing evaluations, treatmentand therapist-client interactions. Students, in pairs, also visit an older adult in the community weekly.Theaccompanying seminar focuses on the OTPractice Framework and offers an arena toshare and discuss observations, clinicalreasoning, and supervision issues. Students may take this course more than once.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 335 - Client Occupations through Service Learning 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 501 - Occupational Therapy Fundamentals


    This course is a study of the historical and current philosophies, models, Frans and frameworks of occupational therapy with emphasis on the present scope of practices, issues, and concepts. The values of occupational performance and activity in prevention, treatment, and health maintenance are also addressed.  Students practice the occupational therapy process and professional reasoning in developing and evaluating occupation based treatment plans.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Occupational therapy major or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 503 - Professional Seminar I


    Students in this seminar/practicum explore their understanding of themselves, the illness/disability experience and the contexts of occupational therapy practice.  Through exploration of the therapeutic use of self, reflective exercises and observational experiences in area clinics, students and faculty collaborate to exam in the dynamics of professional caregiving.  Professional ethics, standards of practice, and interpersonal skills are practiced and discussed during weekly seminar.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Major in occupational therapy or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 505 - Group Process


    This course, including a laboratory experience, focuses on understanding the process of group dynamics, recognizing various types of verbal interactions among group participants, and learning appropriate techniques and interventions to promote insight and improved interpersonal interaction skills.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 501 - Occupational Therapy Fundamentals 



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 505 - Group Process


    This course, including a laboratory experience, focuses on understanding the process of group dynamics, recognizing various types of verbal interactions among group participants, and learning appropriate techniques and intervention to promote insight and improved interpersonal interaction skills.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 506 - Group Process Lab


    Lab component of OCTH 505.

    Credits: 0








  
  •  

    OCTH 512 - Neuroscience and Occupation I


    This course presents the neurological foundations of human performance, behavior, and emotion through lecture and laboratory formats. Students engage in collaborative analysis of clinical examples to better understand the structure, function, and development of the nervous system and its influence on functional tasks throughout the lifespan.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Occupational therapy major.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 514 - Neuroscience and Occupation I Lab


    Lab component of OCTH 512.

    Credits: 0








  
  •  

    OCTH 515 - Functional Movement in Occupations


    Students develop knowledge and skills in observing, evaluating, and describing posture, balance, alignment and movement during performance of functional activities. Students apply principles of kinesiology, biomechanics and motor learning to problems of functional movement. Skills introduced include range of motion, manual muscle testing, splinting and methods of adapting tools, materials and environments.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    OCTH 520 - Development, Occupation and Performance in Infancy and Childhood


    Through the observation and study of human performance from infancy through school age, students recognize and compare normal and dysfunctional processes which may affect growth and development, learning, self-care, play/leosure, social interactions, and familty functioning.  Through class activities and service learning, students refine their observation skills, applying their interpretation of observations as part of the evaluation process and basic intervention planning.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHTH 506 - Clinical Human Anatomy I  

    and

    OCTH 512 - Neuroscience and Occupation I  



    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    OCTH 520 - Development, Occupation, and Performance in Childhood and Infancy


    Through the observation and study of human performance from infancy through school age, students recognize and compare normal and dysfunctional processes which may affect growth and development, learning, self-care, play/leosure, social interactions, and familty functioning. Through class activities and service learning, students refine their observation skills, applying their interpretation of observations as part of the evaluation process and basic intervention planning.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    OCTH 521 - Application of Theory and Evidence in Pediatric Occupational Therapy Practice


    Students will explore the intersection of theory, evidence, and legal considerations that guide testing and intervention in pediatric practice. Commonly used pediatric tests will be assessed and used as part of the process of pediatric evaluation. Test results and resources for evidence based practice will be used to guide development of intervention plans and activities with a diverse population.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 520 - Development, Occupation and Performance in Infancy and Childhood  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 521 - Application of Theory and Evidence in Pediatric Occupational Therapy Practice


    Students will explore the intersection of theory, evidence, and legal considerations that guide testing and intervention in pediatric practice. Commonly used pediatric tests will be assessed and used as part of the process of pediatric evaluation. Test results and resources for evidence based practice will be used to guide development of intervention plans and activities with a diverse population.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 525 - Development, Dysfunction, and Occupational Therapy Adaptation in Adolescents


    This course involves the study of human performance from school age through young adulthood, emphasizing normal and dysfunctional processes which may affect growth and development, learning, self-care, leisure, peer relations, and family functioning. Various theories and occupational therapy frames of reference are utilized in understanding the life tasks of adolescents. Intervention strategies are covered and practiced in a one-hour weekly lab.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 501 - Occupational Therapy Fundamentals 

    and

    OCTH 503 - Professional Seminar I 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 525 - Development, Dysfunction, and Occupational Therapy Adaptation in Adolescents


    This course involves the study of human performance from school age through young adulthood, emphasizing normal and dysfunctional processes which may affect growth and development, learning, self-care, leisure, peer relations, and family functioning. Various theories and occupational therapy frames of reference are utilized in understanding the life tasks of adolescents. Intervention strategies are covered and practiced in a one-hour weekly lab.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 527 - Development, Dysfunction, and Occupational Therapy Adaptation in Adolescents Lab


    Lab component of OCTH 525.

    Credits: 0








  
  •  

    OCTH 527 - Development, Dysfunction, and Occupational Therapy Adaptation in Adolescents Lab


    Lab component of OCTH 525.

    Credits: 0








  
  •  

    OCTH 550 - Occupational Therapy Management


    This course examines the development of occupational therapy programs and departments emphasizing strategic planning, marketing, budgeting, staffing, reimbursement, and federal and state licensing regulations. Managing staff, consulting to agencies, writing grant proposals, and utilizing resources are also explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 501 - Occupational Therapy Fundamentals 

    and

    OCTH 503 - Professional Seminar I 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 550 - Occupational Therapy Management


    This course examines the development of occupational therapy programs and departments emphasizing strategic planning, marketing, budgeting, staffing, reimbursement, and federal and state licensing regulations. Managing staff, consulting to agencies, writing grant proposals, and utilizing resources are also explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 582 - Graduate Seminar


    This course provides a discussion of professional ethics and current issues in the field. Personal values and attitudes, and their relationship to the provision of patient care, are explored as they relate across the spectrum of cultures, classes, and current events.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HSOT major



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 582 - Graduate Seminar


    This course provides a discussion of professional ethics and current issues in the field. Personal values and attitudes, and their relationship to the provision of patient care, are explored as they relate across the spectrum of cultures, classes, and current events.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Occupational therapy major.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 583 - Seminar for Clinical Reasoning


    Students in this seminar explore therelationship between clients’ occupationalroles and dysfunctions in light oftheoretical frames of reference. Throughpeer discussion students develop an appreciation of others’ experiences andgreater confidence for assuming professionalroles. Occupational therapy majors withextensive OT clinical experience may apply to substitute this course for OCTH 584.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor and OTRC.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 583 - Seminar for Clinical Reasoning


    Students in this seminar explore therelationship between clients’ occupationalroles and dysfunctions in light oftheoretical frames of reference. Throughpeer discussion students develop an appreciation of others’ experiences andgreater confidence for assuming professionalroles. Occupational therapy majors withextensive OT clinical experience may apply to substitute this course for OCTH 584.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor and OTRC.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    OCTH 584 - Clinical Education I and Professional Seminar II


    This course is a combination of a supervised field experience in one or more health care setting where occupational therapy is practiced, and a series of seminars. It provides experiences in beginning occupational therapy clinical skills of evaluation, observation, treatment planning, implementation, and clinical reasoning. Students may take this course more than once.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 501 - Occupational Therapy Fundamentals 

    and

    OCTH 503 - Professional Seminar I 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 584 - Clinical Education I and Professional Seminar II


    This course is a combination of a supervised field experience in one or more health care settings where occupational therapy is practiced, and a series of seminars. It provides experiences in beginning occupational therapy clinical skills of evaluation, observation, treatment planning, implementation, and clinical reasoning. Students may take this course more than once.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    OCTH 585 - Individualized Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy


    This course provides additional Level I fieldwork to explore particular clinical interests or to address specific performance issues identified in OCTH 584. The student and an occupational therapy faculty member develop specific objectives for an individualized clinical experience which includes regular supervision with a faculty member and a clinical supervisor, with readings, special projects, written assignments, and/or presentations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    OCTH 584 - Clinical Education I and Professional Seminar II  



    Credits: 1-6








  
  •  

    OCTH 585 - Individualized Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy


    This course provides additional Level I fieldwork to explore particular clinical interests or to address specific performance issues identified in OCTH 584. The student and an occupational therapy faculty member develop specific objectives for an individualized clinical experience which includes regular supervision with a faculty member and a clinical supervisor, with readings, special projects, written assignments, and presentations.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 6-Jan








  
  •  

    OCTH 592 - Individual Study in Occupational Therapy


    This course provides occupational therapy students with the opportunity to engage in individualized study with an occupational therapy faculty member. The student may explore particular academic or professional interests, beyond or within the requirement of the occupational therapy curriculum. The learning experience may include independent reading or writing on a topic related to the field. This course may be taken more than once.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Occupational therapy major or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 1-4








 

Page: 1 <- 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 -> 17