Dec 09, 2022  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Human Services

  
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    HUSB 150 - African-American History


    Within an historical context, this course examines the impact that the African-American experience has had on social change movements in the United States. Beginning with early slave revolts and ending with more recent political activism, particular emphasis will be placed on the interplay between African-American social change theory and the promise of “The American Dream.”

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 151 - Mathematical Inquiry


    Mathematics is crucial to understanding many modern social issues since these issues are often presented as problems of quantity. To understand these issues students must be able to wrestle with quantitative language regarding factors such as the scale of needor the scope of available resources. In this course we will explore the practical mathematical tools that help us understand social problems and empower us to participate actively in decisions about them. These tools enable us to make better decisions as citizens, consumers, and human service advocates.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 155 - Yoga


    This course is an experiential class of yoga practice, meditation and relaxation which includes a pre-class assignment, discussion with small and large groups, exploring choices and ideas for stress reduction, and relaxation and mindfulness techniques to enhance the educational experience and for use in everyday life. It also includes a practice-focused post class assignment.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 156 - Crisis Intervention


    This course covers both frequent and unique situations that might require intervention. It will cover theoretical areas such as crisis theory and the management of interpersonal conflict as well as specific situations such as rape, child abuse, potential suicides and hostage incidents.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 166 - Music and Empowerment


    This course examines the role of music, especially singing, in community building and empowerment. Through readings, films, listening to music and group singing, the course explores music as a tool for social change, community development, healing and education. Special focus is given to the cultural and religious roots of music. Students learn tools for using music in their own human service and community work.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 167 - Domestic Violence


    This course examines the causes and effects of domestic violence in the United States today. It examines the sociological and criminogenic effects on society and strategies for change.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 171 - Statistics


    This course is a basic level statistics course that is being offered to provide students with a fundamental understanding of statistics, including how to comprehend, interpret, evaluate and present data. The purpose is to provide students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of statistics and its application to the field of human services. Topics covered in this course include measures of central tendency, probability, dispersion, confidence interval, and beginning level test statistics (e.g. null-hypothesis, chi-square).

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 203 - Administration: Finances


    This is an intermediate course focusing on long-range planning and the role of grant writing, fund raising, fiscal management and agency relations.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 205 - Financial Management


    This course examines the dynamics and elements of financial management. Students will learn how to develop and assess financial plans, ensure accountability, and develop and manage a budget.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 206 - Public Relations for Community Organizations


    This course introduces the concepts and skills of public relations for community organizations through readings and discussions with speakers from all branches of the media. It covers topics that include writing and submitting press releases; the design, layout, and printing of flyers, posters, and newsletters; and production techniques for radio and television.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 211 - Effective Parent-Child Relationships


    This course enables students to apply their understanding of effective parent-child relationships in a relevant and realistic manner to their work with clients and life. Contemporary theories about parent-child relationships are explored.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 220 - Ecology


    This course examines the basic principles of ecology that help explain the relationship between social action and environmental conditions. Causes and effects of environmental change will be analyzed as well as how change can affect community health. Scientific methods of investigating and documenting environmental health threats to one’s community will be represented.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 221 - Interviewing Techniques


    This course enables students to acquire interviewing skills, develop sensitivity to the frustrations experienced by persons seeking help through the counseling process, acquire self-knowledge and awareness, and understand the necessity of confidentiality in the counseling relationship.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 222 - Exploring Women’s Issues Through Literature


    This course examines how women’s power and self-concept are affected by the political, social and economic realities of one’s ethnic, class and racial/cultural background. The class explores these dynamics via literature written by authors of diverse life histories who raise these themes in their works.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 224 - Human Services Organizations


    This course introduces students to the local and national service organizations in their respective communities and how these organizations deal with people and one another. Also included is the examination of legal and tax status and responsibilities of nonprofit organizations.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 225 - Dynamics of Case Management


    This course explores the principles and practices of case management. It provides the beginning human service worker with practical information about brokering, consumer advocacy and mobilization of services with special attention on the consumer.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 226 - Urban Politics and Decision-Making


    This course analyzes how communities and agencies struggle to change the relationships between the “haves” and the “have nots’ in historical contemporary urban political contexts. Participants analyze the changing configuration of power as it relates to a social problem and policy issue of concern to them, participate in a grassroots political process of change toward greater social justice, reflect upon and evaluate what was learned in the process.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 227 - Intake and Referral


    This course provides students with practical skills for client intake, assessment, interviewing, case recording, case preparation and referral processes. The course addresses issues of contractual relationships with other agencies, privacy and confidentiality, and sharing of information with referral sources.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 229 - Elementary Supervision


    This course examines the principles of employer supervision including professionalism and interpersonal relations, evaluation and motivation of employees, personnel policies and practice, occupational psychology and the decision-making process through case studies of sexual harassment, racism, nepotism and other forms of arbitrary decision-making.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 230 - Introduction to World Literature


    The purpose of this course is to read, enjoy, examine, discuss, analyze and write about different genres of literature as presented in the works of major writers from around the world. These works range from those of classic writers such as William Shakespeare to the contemporary postcolonial work of Jamaica Kincaid.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 233 - Communications Skills II


    This course is a continuation of Communication Skills I, with a focus on developing advanced expository and analytical written and oral skills. In addition, this course will concentrate on the research paper regarding the tools necessary to complete one.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 234 - Health and Professionalism


    This course explores issues surrounding the labeling, control and treatment of those who are seen as deviant as well as issues of institutionalization and de-institutionalization in health care settings.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 235 - The Latino/Hispanic Experience in the U.S.


    This course will examine Latino families and communities, the largest and most rapidly growing minority group in the U.S.; the U.S. Census (2010) projects that by 2050 it will comprise more than 30% of the U.S. population. The first part of the course will focus on understanding similarities and differences between Latino groups with respect to socio-political history, migration patterns, oppression, identity and cultural factors. The contributions of Latinos to the U.S. will also be examined. The second part of the course will explore specific needs and issues with regards to Latina/os as they relate to provision of human services (e.g., health, mental health, immigration, aging, education).

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 236 - Human Growth and Development


    This course focuses on how to deal successfully with life changes/transitions as well as the associated stress and anxiety by understanding the stages of transition and their implications; analyzing established patterns of coping with change; and developing personal strategies for dealing with future transitions. Students will be provided with a learning experience that enables them to enhance their personal growth and development as well as begin the process of making positive life changes.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 238 - Data Systems


    This course explores techniques to increase the usefulness of word processing, spreadsheet and database applications through simple programming and integration. Topics include effective use of Microsoft Word, Power Point, Excel and Access and the appropriate navigation of data within all programs.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 239 - Exploring Racial Perspectives Through Literature


    This course examines the dynamics of racism and internalized oppression from historical, sociological, cross-cultural and international perspectives. Literature from authors with diverse life histories is the primary catalyst for this exploration. Historical and sociological texts supplement the themes raised in the literature.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 240 - Introduction to Psychopathology


    This course is an introduction to the assumptions, theories and concepts of psycopathology. Emphasis is placed on the and etiology, symptomatology in treatment of various mental health disorders.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 241 - Coping with Disease & Death


    This course analyzes how the sociological and psychological implications of disease relate to coping mechanisms and interaction with others and how the conceptualization of disease connects with the specter of dying and the finality of death. It examines the patient’s and the patient’s family’s needs and how these needs influence the institutions involved.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 242 - Public Health and Health Education


    This course covers many topics: the nature of our health systems; the concept of multiple risks; various risk reduction strategies; the historical origins of public health; the possibility of solving health problems through formal and informal health education; and individual, social and organizational approaches to health education. These issues are examined in order to assess the nature and role of health educators.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 251 - Special Topics in Human Services I


    Responding to changing currents in the field of human services, this course explores a topic of contemporary relevance. The course provides an introduction to the fundamental issues presented by the topic, in a 1-dayclassroom setting.

    Credits: 1-3








  
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    HUSB 254 - Contemporary Issues in Human Biology


    This course focuses on the balance of hereditary and environmental forces in human biology and the relationship of human beings in our natural/material environments.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 255 - Transformational Alternatives: The Complexities of Ethical Actions


    This course will be a theoretical and experiential examination of the moral decision-making processes brought to bear in the personal and professional life of the criminal justice practitioner. Class participants will conduct an inquiry into various works of moral philosophy and will examine the ways that morality and ethics inform personal and professional behaviors. Through analyses of essays, short stories, poems, and research studies, students will consider applications of ethical actions as they pertain to issues of social justice. Finally, the student will be brought to an awareness of the necessity of the means for advocating significant and substantive change in the criminal justice workplace.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 256 - Health and Society


    This course defines and explores health care for people. It conceptualizes the health “forest” of which the professional personal treatment “tree” is a part. It is organized around four themes: caring for sickness versus health care; professional caregivers versus self-care; public health care versus personal health care; and public health defined by the state versus public health defined by and for the citizenry.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 257 - Health Care and Aging I


    The course reviews the physiological etiology of aging, the interrelationship between physiological change in mental health, self-assessment, needs assessment, status issues and work and family and institutional settings.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 258 - Health Care and Aging II


    This course reviews the techniques of working with the geriatric patient. The therapeutic community, sensory training, reality orientation, remotivation and group activities as therapy are examined.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 260 - Race and Justice


    This course examines the roles that race, ethnicity, gender and class play in the treatment an individual receives while “participating” in the U.S. society and the criminal justice system. It explores several topic areas including arrest, sentencing, and corrections. In addition, students are introduced to Critical Race Theory (CRT), a theory which challenges the ways in which race and racial power are constructed in U.S. society. Issues including affirmative action, property rights, and the social construction of race are discussed.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 265 - Professional Writing


    This course teaches students how to approach and completetasks commonly associated with professional writing:writing effective email, memos, and letters; crafting appeals for funding; writing reports; preparing agendas and minutes; composing, administering, tabulating and reporting on surveys; and preparing press releases as well as conducting presentations. In addition, the course is designed to help students gain confidence in their overall ability to write effectively at work, at school, and in their personal lives.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 275 - Healing in Cross-Cultural Perspective


    This course examines the fundamental role of culture in shaping personal and social dimensions of illness and healing. It emphasizes a comparative methodology based on the in-depth study of selected cultural healing traditions. It demonstrates how a cross-cultural perspective contributes to effective human service work in a multiethnic society.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 280 - Database Management


    The principles of computing, database management and applications generation are introduced. The course investigates the concepts and techniques underlying systems and assesses some of the features to look for in good software. Standardization and organization of information are explained in the context of developing a data dictionary based on fields, records and files comprising a database. Students design and program a custom report through the use of an associated report-generator known as FORMS.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 284 - Current Events in an International Context


    The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major social forces as they relate to American international relations.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 301 - Integrative Core Seminar I: Education, Oppression, and Resistance


    Learners’ personal experiences and the experiences of others, in addition to historical, sociological and political texts and works of literature and music are used to explore the themes raised in the course. Among those themes are: the role of social service and educational institutions in the ideological development of a society; deeper appreciation of cultural values and their impact on learner’ development; and an appreciation for how the creative arts can serve as a vehicle for empowerment.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 302 - Integrative Core Seminar II: Global Economy, Culture, and Community


    This course examines the bedrock of a social system-economics. The American economic system is looked at from a personal and theoretical level. In addition to understanding key economic concepts, students look at the role of the global economy from both an American and international perspective and the impact of the economy on human service workers and delivery systems. They also envision alternative approaches to the economy in its relationship to society.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 303 - Integrative Core Seminar III: Social Transformation and Alternative Visions


    Participants critically evaluate a range of political philosophies and the irrelationship to social change, the democratic process, and the privileges and consequences of injustice. Key issues within such social movements as the labor, racial and gender justice, global human rights and environmental movements are analyzed, compared and assessed. Participants’ own unique process of individual and societal transformation, philosophic visions and approaches to social action and human service are clarified and refined.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    and





    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 304 - A Critical Overview of Human Services


    Describe the political-historical evolution of human services in the SUnited States. Analyze the root causes of service recipient problems and compare social control, adjustment, and transformative strategies of intervention. Examine the power relations and ‘isms’ embedded in human service bureaucracies; explore professional-client, management-labor relations, and common ethical dilemmas. Research exemplary human service models, define and creatively apply principles of progressive practice in ones own area.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 305 - Issues in Research


    Issues in Research provides the tools needed to complete Group Project successfully. Working individually, participants conduct a community needs assessment and present their findings both in writing, using APA style, and orally to the class. Each participant gathers information from government documents, census data, professional research articles, and surveys with community leaders and residents. Following the assessment, participants are ready to prepare an action plan and engage communities in building coalitions and implementing sustained social change.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Two college-level writing courses or equivalent. This course is a prerequisite for Group Project I.



    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 307 - Human Services Portfolio Development


    This course introduces students to adult learning and development theories and the information and skills necessary to succeed in a demanding non-traditional program. Using their own life histories as case studies, students examine a variety of issues that pertain to their own development and acculturation. The course helps students develop the capacity to effectively document their experience and articulate their college-level knowledge; thus it provides a foundation for Portfolio preparation. This course can be waived for those students who will not submit a Portfolio.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Two college-level writing courses or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 314 - Counseling from a Racial Perspective


    This course provides information and methods for racially sensitive counseling and examines the differing world views that may be found among different groups.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 316 - Psychology of Women:Theories and Practices


    This course utilizes contemporary and emerging literature that offers new perspectives on the psychology of women.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 318 - Cross-Cultural Perspectives in Social Services


    The purpose of this course is to engage students from different backgrounds in serious analytical discussions of cultural, ethnic and national similarities and differences in systems for meeting human needs that include education, health care, food, and human and community development.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 323 - The Process of Practical Politics


    This course provides students with an introduction to and an overview of state legislative political systems and the strategies utilized to affect political outcomes. The course covers the structure of the legislative and executive branches, their internal organization, the election process and the lawmaking process.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 325 - Politics and Philosophy of Education


    From a philosophical, historical and cross-cultural framework, participants examine the impact of power dynamics,economics and culture on the education process. This course explores the fundamental social philosophies and educational visions that underlie a variety of education policies and reform efforts across the political spectrum. Participants research an educational issue of great concern to them, and develop their own philosophical vision and practical agenda for change.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 326 - Family Counseling and Understanding Diverse Cultures


    This course will provide students numerous frameworks and examples that deepen their understanding of the sociopolitical contexts which affect families, and the intersection between race, culture, and gender in a multicultural society that affect clinical practice. The relationship among external dynamics such as racism, sexism, classism, and heterosexism; family of origin systemic factors; and internal psychological perception such as a sense of inferiority or superiority will be examined.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 330 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 1


    Group Project 1 providesthe opportunity fordirect involvement in a community-based action research project. Working in small groups, students develop group protocols and responsibilities. In partnership with members of the community, student groups work on understanding the strengths, challenges, and possibilities of the community while designing possible strategies to address community-identified issue(s). Student groups are responsible for submitting a formal research proposal for the work to be continued in Group Project 2 and 3.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
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    HUSB 331 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 2


    The Group Project constitutes three terms, each of which is worth four semester hour credits. Working together in groups of two to five members, learners identify a problem in a given community and design an action research plan to address it. The Group Project provides the opportunity to be directly involved in grass roots work to impact a community’s social dynamics and to practice the methodological skills acquired in HUSB 305. Learners’ responsibilities include needs assessment and analysis, history of the issue and of the community, group development, problem framing and solving, formative and summative evaluation, and the practice skills needed to implement the project.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
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    HUSB 332 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 3


    The third course in the Group Project sequence focuses on evaluation, documentation, and oral presentation of the group project. The course requires students to produce a written final report that assess the impact of the group project on the participants and the community. There is a formal group presentation of project findings to faculty and community partner(s).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
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    HUSB 337 - Confronted By Violence


    This course consists of a series of workshops on issues prevalent in our society including domestic violence, child abuse, substance abuse and rape. These subjects are explored within the context of United States history, social welfare and the law.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 338 - Human Sexuality


    This course intends to help students develop a broader understanding of human sexual functioning by examining a wide range of behaviors from a physiological, psychosocial, cultural, and behavioral frame of reference.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 339 - Preventive Holistic Health


    This course examines alternatives to the current health delivery system with particular reference to how people deal with their own health care as it relates to primary, secondary and tertiary prevention.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 348 - Creative Writing For Social Change


    This course develops creative thinking and writing skills for dealing with the issues of social change. After identifying a human services issue, students develop a piece of creative writing which carries a premise that promotes social change. Students learn fundamentals of writing lyrics, poems, short stories, plays and teleplays developed through improvisation.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 350 - Race, Religion and Culture


    This course investigates the interplay between race, religion and culture within societies and organizations attempting to move towards equality and democracy. A range of thinking is examined.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 360 - Fitness/Wellness I


    This three-part course teaches a student the value of physical activity as it relates to wellness in his/her life. The student learns to assesstheir own fitness level and develop a personalized program, a Fitness/Wellness Plan, to enhance his/her life. Topics covered include environmental issues, stress reduction, components of fitness, cardiopulmonary endurance, development of muscular strengths and endurance, development of flexibility, weight control and body composition, basic nutrition as it relates to fitness, common fitness injuries, drug and alcohol abuse issues, sexually transmitted diseases and lifetime fitness activities.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 361 - Fitness/Wellness II


    This three-part course teaches a student the value of physical activity as it relates to wellness in his/her life. The student learns to assesstheir own fitness level and develop a personalized program, a Fitness/Wellness Plan, to enhance his/her life. Topics covered include environmental issues, stress reduction, components of fitness, cardiopulmonary endurance, development of muscular strengths and endurance, development of flexibility, weight control and body composition, basic nutrition as it relates to fitness, common fitness injuries, drug and alcohol abuse issues, sexually transmitted diseases and lifetime fitness activities.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 362 - Fitness/Wellness III


    This three-part course teaches a student the value of physical activity as it relates to wellness in his/her life. The student learns to assesstheir own fitness level and develop a personalized program, a Fitness/Wellness Plan, to enhance his/her life. Topics covered include environmental issues, stress reduction, components of fitness, cardiopulmonary endurance, development of muscular strengths and endurance, development of flexibility, weight control and body composition, basic nutrition as it relates to fitness, common fitness injuries, drug and alcohol abuse issues, sexually transmitted diseases and lifetime fitness activities.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 365 - Gambling as an Addiction


    This course focuses on content related to gambling disorders and how gambling disorders manifest in clients in human service agencies and settings.

    Credits: 1








  
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    HUSB 366 - Culture & Political Thought of Third World People


    This course surveys the social, cultural and political aspects of several Third World countries and their cultural transformations in order to develop an understanding of the role of culture in the process of social change and liberation struggles. It develops an understanding of the cross-cultural factors that influence people of color living in Africa, Latin America and North America.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 367 - Psycho-Politics of Male-Female Relationships


    This course defines psycho-politics as it relates to male-female relationships, describes major characteristics of present male-female power dynamics, examines perspectives on relationships through a variety of psychological and political constructs, and outlines differences and similarities of relationships in diverse cultural and class settings.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 368 - Social Philosophy


    This course compares and contrasts a range of philosophers who have had a great impact on our social consciousness. It aims to help students master certain basic philosophical principles in relation to their social activities and enables them to develop a social consciousness that defines their social responsibilities.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 369 - Victimization


    This course provides an introduction to victimization including theory, social trends, intervention skills and the role of institutions and social attitudes in the dynamics of victimization. The importance of empowerment in overcoming victimization is stressed.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 379 - Cultural Change in the African Diaspora


    This course examines the role of culture and the development of social and political thought of Third World societies with emphasis on the peoples of the African Diaspora.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 388 - World Views Analysis


    This course investigates the nature of current global resources, development and environmental crises; and analyzes the world views or social values, structures and systems underlying these crises, as well as alternative world views for a peaceful and environmentally sustainable global society.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 391 - Independent Study I


    Responding to changing currents in the field of human services, this course explores a topic of contemporary relevance. The course provides an introduction to the fundamental issues presented by the course topic.

    Credits: 1-3








  
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    HUSB 416 - Senior Seminar


    Issues in Research provides the tools needed to complete Group Project successfully. Working individually, participants conduct a community needs assessment and present their findings both in writing, using APA style, and orally to the class. Each participant gathers information from government documents, census data, professional research articles, and surveys with community leaders and residents. Following the assessment, participants are ready to prepare an action plan and engage communities in building coalitions and implementing sustained social change.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    To be taken in the final term of enrollment.



    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 451 - Grant Writing and Fundraising


    This course provides an overview of necessary skills in grant writing and the techniques utilized in applying for public and private funding sources. It reviews the elements of proposal development and proposal writing strategies as well as grants management processes.

    Credits: 3








  
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    HUSB 486 - Internship


    The internship is a course of practical study through placement in a work experience in a community service agency. Acceptable internship settings provide the student with an opportunity to develop new skills or work with a new problem or population. Under close supervision, students acquire experience in providing direct service to consumers and learn how agencies function. Credit hours awarded will vary depending on hours of internship performed at the chosen agency.

    Credits: 3-12








  
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    PROJ 330 - Group Project in Community Development and Change I


    Group Project 1 providesthe opportunity fordirect involvement in a community-based action research project. Working in small groups, students develop group protocols and responsibilities. In partnership with members of the community, student groups work on understanding the strengths, challenges, and possibilities of the community while designing possible strategies to address community-identified issue(s). Student groups are responsible for submitting a formal research proposal for the work to be continued in Group Project 2 and 3.

    Credits: 4








  
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    PROJ 331 - Group Project in Community Development and Change II


    The Group Project constitutes three terms, each of which is worth four semester hour credits. Working together in groups of two to five members, learners identify a problem in a given community and design an action research plan to address it. The Group Project provides the opportunity to be directly involved in grass roots work to impact a community’s social dynamics and to practice the methodological skills acquired in HUSB 305. Learners’ responsibilities include needs assessment and analysis, history of the issue and of the community, group development, problem framing and solving, formative and summative evaluation, and the practice skills needed to implement the project.

    Credits: 4








  
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    PROJ 332 - Group Project in Community Development and Change III


    The third course in the Group Project sequence focuses on evaluation, documentation, and oral presentation of the group project. The course requires students to produce a written final report that assess the impact of the group project on the participants and the community. There is a formal group presentation of project findings to faculty and community partner(s).

    Credits: 4








  
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    PROJ 350 - Group Project 1


    Group Project 1 focuses on implementation of the project by the students working collaboratively with community-basd organizations and individuals.  Group responibilities include data collection, preliminary analysis of data, and mobilization of available community networks, resources and stakeholders toward actively addressing a community-identified issues(s).  Groups are responsible for submitting an updated research paper for the work to be continued in Project 2.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HUSB 109 - Group Dynamics  



    Credits: 3








  
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    PROJ 351 - Group Project 2


    Group Project 2 focuses on evaluation, documentation, and oral presentation of the completed group project. The course requires students to produce a written final report that assesses the impact of the group project on the participants as well as on the community.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PROJ 350 - Group Project 1  



    Credits: 3









Management

  
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    MGMT 486 - Management Internship


    The internship highlights academic study with a focus in various areas of management. It offers students the opportunity to test classroom theory, align career goals, develop a professional outlook, proof communication skills, and deepen the understanding of the functions of management in a business setting. Academic credit is dependent upon the number of hours spent at the internship site. Courses for junior and senior business majors only.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPCO 220 - Internship Preparation Seminar  



    Credits: 1-6









Marketing

  
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    MKTG 486 - Marketing Internship


    The internship highlights academic study with a focus in various areas of marketing. It offers students the opportunity to test classroom theory, align career goals, develop a professional outlook, proof communication skills, and deepen the understanding of the functions of marketing in a business setting. Academic credit is dependent upon the number of hours spent at the internship site. Courses for junior and senior business majors only.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPCO 220 - Internship Preparation Seminar  



    Credits: 1-6









Mathematics

  
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    MATH 090 - Introductory College Mathematics


    This course involves the study of the fundamental concepts that are essential in preparation for further study of college mathematics. The concepts include, but are not limited to, properties and operations of real numbers; ratio, proportion, and percent; solving elementary equations in one variable; and an introduction to polynomials. Students must obtain a minimum grade of C+ in order to advance to a General Education category in mathematics.

    Credits: 0








  
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    MATH 101 - Foundations of Mathematics


    This course presents fundamental concepts of mathematics in a problem-solving mode.  Topics include an introduction to sets, properties, and operations on numbers in various number systems, percent, ratios, and related sets. This course is designed specifically for students seeking licensure to teach in the elementary grades.  It is in accordance with the standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the Massachusetts State Guidelines for Teacher Preparation.  This course does not fulfill the General Education category in quantitative reasoning.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 102 - Mathematics in Action


    This is an introductory course designed to provide students with the knowledge of how math can be used to achieve success in the real world.  The applications teach students to think critically, manage finances, become wise consumers, and be successful analysts in everyday life.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 103 - Sports Statistics


    This course is designed to introduce the students to statistics by using examples   
    taken from various sports. Topics include: analyzing attendance; analyzing offensive  and defensive performance; using regression analysis and statistical distributions; and various statistical models.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 090 - Introductory College Mathematics  or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MATH 105 - Survey of Algebra and Geometry


    This course presents foundational concepts of functions, patterns, and geometry in a problem-solving mode.  Topics from algebra include functions, graphing, equations, and inequalities, and topics from geometry include measurement, congruence, and properties of polygons and circles.  This course is compatible with Massachusetts elementary teacher preparation program guidelines and fulfills the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 090 - Introductory College Mathematics  or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 115 - College Algebra


    This course introduces a study of the real number system, linear and radical equations, and systems of linear inequalities in two variables. It also provides a basic introduction to exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. This course is not considered for mathematics major credit.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 090 - Introductory College Mathematics  or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 125 - Precalculus Mathematics


    This course consists of the essentials of trigonometry and analytic geometry. It gives a foundation for further study in calculus topics, including circular and logarithmic functions, their graphs and applications, polar coordinates, and conic sections. This course is not considered for math major credit.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 115 - College Algebra  or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 131 - Introduction to Calculus with Applications


    This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus for those students who intend to take calculus as a terminal mathematics course. Topics to be considered include limits, continuity, the definition of the derivative, the product, quotient and chain rules of differentiation, implicit differentiation, optimization, indefinite and definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Applications of calculus are stressed, including applications to the biological sciences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 125 - Precalculus Mathematics  or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 140 - Calculus I


    This course covers functions and graphs; limits, continuity, and differentiation of rational, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions; chain rule; application of derivatives; integrals; definite integrals; and techniques of integration.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 125 - Precalculus Mathematics  or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MATH 142 - Calculus II


    This course covers functions and graphs; limits, continuity, and differentiation of rational, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions; chain rule; application of derivatives; integrals; definite integrals; and techniques of integration.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 140 - Calculus I  or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 201 - Contemporary Applications of Mathematics


    This course consists of in-depth applications of mathematics to various problems drawn from a wide range of disciplines including physics, engineering, finance, earth science, etc.  Topics include Fundamentals of Graph theory, Elementary Statistics, Counting and Probability, and Mathematical Modeling.  This course fulfills the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 205 - Geometry


    After a rapid review of plane geometry, this course covers axiomatic geometry, including both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, and introduces projective geometry. The relationship between various transformations and geometries is studied.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 215 - Probability and Statistics


    This course introduces methods of collecting, organizing, analyzing, and presenting numerical data. Probability theory is used to make inferences about the populations from which the sample data are drawn. The mathematical statistics investigate types of frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, and hypotheses testing.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 115 - College Algebra  or equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 220 - Calculus III


    This course offers more on the techniques of differential and integral calculus, partial differentiation, multiple integration, sequences and series, three-dimensional vector calculus, and surface and line integrals and their applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 140 - Calculus I  

    and

    MATH 142 - Calculus II  



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 222 - Calculus IV


    This course offers more on the techniques of differential and integral calculus, partial differentiation, multiple integration, sequences and series, three-dimensional vector calculus, and surface and line integrals and their applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 220 - Calculus III  



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 235 - Discrete Mathematics I


    This course is a keystone to understanding introductory elements and concepts of contemporary mathematics and its applications to the various fields of the modern world. Topics include set theory, elementary symbolic logic, permutations, combinations, probability, linear systems, and introductory matrix algebra with applications.

    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 282 - Seminar in Sports Analytics


    This course covers the application of analytics and sports using probability, statistics, and other mathematical tools. Questions to be considered include ranking sports teams and players, and analyzing strategic decisions and sports. This course builds on the foundation of Math 103, Sports Statistics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 103 - Sports Statistics  



    Credits: 3








  
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    MATH 305 - Elementary Differential Equations


    This course considers ordinary differential equations with applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 220 - Calculus III  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    MATH 310 - Linear Algebra


    This course includes the notation, terminology, algebra of, interpretation of, and applications of vectors and matrices. More abstract ideas, vector spaces, and characteristic roots are also covered.

    Credits: 3








 

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