May 29, 2024  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer and Information Sciences

  
  • CISC 335 - Literacy, Hypermedia, and Modern Communication


    Students in this course explore the relationship of technology and communication, focusing on hypertext and hypermedia’s power to redefine literacy in the classroom and in the workplace. Students work toward a definition of literacy’s historical evolution from oral to pictoral and graphic to print, focusing on the noetic demands and impact of that evolution. With hands-on use of the technology, the course investigates the shift from paper-bound to electronic literacy particularly as embodied in hypertext and hypermedia.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CISC 375 - Computer Architecture


    This course deals with a detailed study of those concepts that are essential in the design of a computer architecture. Topics covered include hardware algorithms for computer arithmetic, computer systems organization, memory organization, addressing techniques, memory allocation and protection, cache and virtual memories, input/output structures, channels, and interfaces.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CISC 420 - Software Engineering for Game Programming


    This course is a capstone course that applies basic principles of software engineering to the programming of non-violent computer games. Major topics include Windows programming, DirectX programming, Open GL, object-oriented software engineering, software design patterns, animation programming, physics modeling, sprites, collision detection, basic artificial intelligence, and development of game engines.  Competency in C++ and Java programming is required.  Other contemporary languages such as Python, Ruby, and Lua are introduced.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  • CISC 482 - Computer Systems Seminar


    This course is designed to address various current technical and managerial problems encountered in computer information systems, including those dealing with hardware architecture, systems software, and applications software.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  • CISC 486 - Field Experience in Computer Information Systems-Management


    This course provides students with the opportunity to apply academic skills, mastered in the study of computer information systems-management, within the scope of an industrial environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Departmental approval.



    Credits: 3









Counseling

  
  • CMHC 601 - Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling


    In this course students will explore the historical, theoretical and practical aspects of the clinical mental health counseling field. Current trends, professional identity, ethical issues and other relevant matters for clinical mental health counseling will be examined. Students will be exposed to various settings where mental health services are provided and will examine prevention and treatment strategies related to community clinical mental health counseling.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CMHC 684 - Counseling Practicum


    The counseling practicum is the student’s initial opportunity to practice in the field or in a clinical lab setting, clinical skills in such areas as initial interviewing and intakes, testing and evaluations, gathering of diagnostic and prescriptive information, individual/group counseling, plan development, case management, coordination and placement. The practicum requires a minimum of 100 clock hours over the course of the semester. This must include 40 direct service with clients. The practicum requires students to observe and participate in all aspects of the delivery of counseling services, with an emphasis on client interaction. The practicum is an opportunity to develop and refine counseling skills, and to address important issues related to the counseling relationship (i.e., ethics, confidentiality, self-disclosure, etc.). The practicum experience is a prerequisite to the counseling internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMHC 601 - Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling  

    and

     



    Credits: 3-12








  
  • CMHC 686 - Internship in Clinical Mental Health Counseling


    The purpose of the internship course to help students implement counseling skills into counseling practice.  This course is designed to provide a supportive, structured learning environment for acquiring clinical experience, developing and enhancing professional competencies. The internship is a time to build a framework of new professional counseling skills on a foundation of the material learned in the program courses. Over the course of their Internship experiences students are required to complete a minimum of 600 clock hours, of which at least 240 are direct client contact.  Course topics include but are not limited to counseling skills; record keeping; legal and ethical issues; collaboration techniques; developing and evaluating programs/interventions for clients.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COUN 622, COUN 634, COUN 631, COUN 614, COUN 613, COUN 625, COUN 629, CMHC 601, CMHC 682



    Credits: 1-12








  
  • COUN 580 - Special Topics Workshop in Special Issues and Techniques in Rehabilitation


    This course provides an opportunity for an intensive examination, discussion, and skill development in a specialty area of rehabilitation services. Designated topical units may be selected from disability areas, rehabilitation techniques, or current professional issues. This course may be taken up to a maximum of 6 semester hours of credit.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 2-3








  
  • COUN 585 - Treatment Methods in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation


    This course is an introduction to the major issues in the field of alcohol and substance abuse rehabilitation, including etiology, models of recovery, and the biological and psychological consequences of substance abuse. Primary consideration is given to treatment issues; polyaddiction, specific detoxification methods; self-help programs; individual and group counseling; therapeutic community residencies; and family and other support groups.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 587 - Substance Abuse and Family Treatment


    This course is an introduction to the issues and techniques of treatment of the family affected by substance abuse or dependency. Central topics discussed in this course include: viewing the family as a client, diagnostic assessment techniques, and prescriptive treatment of the substance abuser or dependent client, extended family members and children. An emphasis is also placed on child development in unhealthy family systems.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 602 - Implications of Disabilities on the Family


    The focus of this course is on understanding the world view of the parent, child, sibling, or spouse of a person with a disability. A family system approach is used in examining problems in readjustment to disability and the effectiveness of coping strategies. Students examine the goals of interventions, including support of the family unit and its individual members.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 603 - Assessment, Appraisal and Testing in Counseling


    This course aims to establish an understanding of the problems involved in the measurement of abilities, achievement, attitudes, interests, behavior, and personality. Methods of test construction and the concepts of reliability and validity are considered. Cultural issues related to assessment are explored, and the ability to critically evaluate assessment techniques from a scientist-practitioner perspective is fostered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 606 - Case Management and Rehabilitation Planning


    This course is an introduction to case management and caseload management procedures, techniques, and issues. The relationship of evaluation, counseling, vocational rehabilitation, independent living, and utilization of community resources are investigated. Casework recording and management skills, including computer application technologies, are presented.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COUN 505 - Rehabilitation Counseling and Services: History, Philosophy, Ethics, and Practice  



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 610 - Research and Program Evaluation in Counseling


    This course will introduce counseling students to applied human research providing basic knowledge and skills in quantitative and qualitative educational and counseling to help them become competent as both consumers and producers of research. Attention will be given to applied research and data collection used in program evaluation and research that will inform counseling practice and interventions. This course will provide students with a basic framework for understanding and evaluating research studies. It will also provide knowledge of the various types of research designs used in educational research and the procedures for conducting research studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 612 - Psychopharmacology


    This course examines the role of psychotropic medication in the treatment of a variety of mental health conditions, including but not limited to depressive disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, and substance use disorders.  An overview of the etiology, pathology and development of such conditions within individuals will be presented, while the basic principles of pharmacokinetics (what one’s body does to a drug) and pharmacodynamics (the effects of the drug on the body) for each class of drugs will be discussed in-depth.  Other topics of discussion include identifying the multiple uses and treatment implications of psychotropic medications in schools, hospitals, and other community settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COUN 617 - Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Treatment Planning  



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 613 - Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice in Counseling


    This course provides a foundation for the ethical practice of counseling focusing on such issues as ethical decision-making through an understanding of legal and ethical standards of practice for counselors including self-examination. Issues such as client rights, confidentiality, dual relationships, duty to warn, consent for treatment, and ethical consideration of special populations are reviewed. Licensing, federal and regional laws associated with various counseling specialty areas including school, clinical mental health and rehabilitation counseling.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 614 - Counseling Diverse Populations


    This course examines the complex interplay of values, expectations, social and political forces and current issues that influence the counselor/client relationship. Students are provided with an opportunity to gain multicultural competency as professional counselors working in mental health agencies, schools, and other settings. Through a critical multicultural lens, students will be exposed to broad diversity constructs such as gender, race, ethnicity and culture, religious preference, socio and economic status, sexual orientation, and physical appearance and ability.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 615 - Child Development and Counseling


    This course examines the bio-psychosocial development of children and adolescents. Learning, normal development, and play therapy techniques are covered.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 617 - Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Treatment Planning


    This course introduces counseling students to the concepts of psychopathology and to major diagnostic categories of the current DSM. General principles and practices for the promotion of optimal human development and mental health will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on differential diagnosis and understanding of how cultural, biological, social, psychopharmacology and psychological factors are necessary when developing a holistic and ethical, culturally responsive model of assessment and treatment planning.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 618 - Guided Independent Study


    Counseling students with special needs, interests, and capacities conduct individual study under faculty supervision involving library work, tutorial work, research,independent reading or writing, or anapproved activity which contributes to theeducational growth of a particular student. This course is not a substitute for, nor part of, the thesis requirement.

    Credits: 2-3








  
  • COUN 622 - Counseling Theories


    This course presents an introduction to the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy. Students learn the central constructs and methods of the theories as well as their limitations and practical implications.  Emphasis is placed on the applicability of the approaches to work with diverse client populations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 623 - Trauma and Crisis Counseling


    This course is designed to introduce students to basic crisis intervention strategies. The course addresses fundamental crisis intervention theory and offers practical applications in various crisis situations. Students will explore various assessments, interventions and crisis treatment issues. Students will gain an understanding of disaster psychology, natural disasters, terrorism, school violence, and suicidality from multicultural perspectives.Special emphasis will be placed on the impact of trauma on the individual, family and community. Students will learn and practice applying specific interventions in crisis scenarios.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 625 - Group Work: Theories and Practice


    This course is a combination of didactic and experiential activities. Students are exposed to the basics of group counseling and therapy. Through the study of both content and process; students are exposed to the stages in the development of a group, theoretical approaches to group counseling and therapy and ethical issues involved in group counseling. The course entails supervised experience as a both a leader and co-leader of groups, with group supervision and discussion on the nature of the work of leading groups. The goal of this course is to integrate concepts and skills; theory is applied to the actual practice of group work. To accomplish this goal, the course provides:

    ·         Self-assessment inventory (screening) on the process and practice of groups

    ·         opportunities to lead groups with supervision and ongoing feedback

    ·         participation in demonstrations of various group models and theoretical approaches

    ·         reflections about the group process

    ·         readings on theory and practice of group counseling and therapy

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 629 - Counseling Skill Development


    This course provides an introduction and opportunity to practice basic counseling skills. It includes content in the following areas: The importance and role of self-awareness in the counseling process in a multicultural society; a review of the elements of effective helping relationships and principles involved in establishing them; knowledge and skills in the problem-solving process in counseling; and exposure to models of counseling that are consistent with current professional research and practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 630 - Children with Disabilities


    This course develops concepts related to students with moderate and severe special needs. Instruction encompasses issues relevant to the nature, causes and basic life and educational needs of children with moderate and severe delays. Terminology, modifications, and accommodations of services and supports are described and practiced. Intervention strategies are introduced for a wide array of special needs. Instructional approaches principles and strategies are identified and applied. Students learn to prepare and adapt curricular content and work with others in delivering services and supports based on “best practices.”

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 634 - Human Development Across the Lifespan


    This course examines currently held theories of human nature and needs of persons at all developmental levels across the life span.  These theories will be examined in a multi-cultural context.  These include: individual and family development, learning and personality development, current understandings about neurological behavior, resilience, and framework for intervention strategies for exceptional abilities, disability, psychopathology, trauma, addiction and wellness.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 639 - Alcohol and Substance Abuse Treatment


    This course investigates the etiology of alcoholism and drug dependency. Attention is given to assessment and treatment in both individual and family therapy approaches.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 640 - Counseling the College Bound Student


    This course explores the college admissionsprocess, with emphasis on current issues confronting secondary school counselors,application and admissions criteria for various types of colleges and collegecounseling for special student populations.  Students gain an understanding of theresources available to counselors in the college admissions process including printmaterial, software, web sites and organizations. Psychological and family issues in college counseling are also explored.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 641 - Human Sexuality


    This course studies all forms of human sexual behavior, with emphasis on attitudes and practical concerns, such as interpersonal relationships, emotional involvement, and sexual difficulties, failures, and therapy.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 642 - Behavioral Techniques for the Developmentally Disabled


    This course is an introduction to the principles of applied behavior analysis, with attention to effectiveness with youth and adults who have developmental disabilities. The case study approach is used to provide guidelines for solving specific problems. Students design and implement behavior modification programs for various rehabilitation settings.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 643 - Career Counseling and Development


    This course provides counseling students with an understanding of how career development occurs, from various theoretical standpoints, while also taking into consideration the unique contributions of other life aspects to career development.  A framework for career development interventions across a variety of professional and counseling settings will be provided.  Current issues such as college counseling, employment trends, assessment, social justice, and the use of technology in career counseling are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 644 - Counseling in Community Settings


    The focus of this course is on the community level of policy and program planning, participation, prevention, and evaluation. This includes planning and executing crisis services, dealing with issues of housing and employment, developing community participation, encouraging self-help and support groups, and advocacy work.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 645 - Consultation and Collaboration in Schools


    This course is designed to provide school counselors with models and strategies to become effective leaders, advocates, consultants and collaborators in school communities. Significant emphasis is placed on ways to partner with families and community agencies, strategies to identify and break down systemic barriers, ways to build positive school culture and collaborate with school stakeholders to help children succeed. Students will learn how develop consultation and collaboration skills through practical experiences with families, community agencies and schools.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 646 - Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disability


    This course is intended to acquaint students with the medical information necessary to practice as a rehabilitation counselor.  Emphasis is placed on interpreting and understanding medical information, evaluation, related psycho-social, lifestyle and educational-vocational aspects for typical disability or chronic illness cases.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 650 - Vocational Rehabilitation and Job Placement


    This course will focus on developing the awareness, knowledge, and skills necessary for rehabilitation counselors to provide employment and career services. This course will provide students with information about the vocational aspects of disability. Students will be provided with an introduction to career development theory and career counseling interventions within the context of the rehabilitation process. Job placement and job development strategies and techniques used to facilitate employment of people with disabilities will be explored in both public and private settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COUN 505 - Rehabilitation Counseling and Services: History, Philosophy, Ethics, and Practice  



    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 660 - Treatment Modalities


    This course provides a review of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Feminist Therapy, Motivational Interviewing and Solution Focused Brief Therapy. Modalities of treatment will focus on individual counseling, family counseling, group counseling, crisis intervention and medication management. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of theories to practice, including case conceptualization and corresponding therapeutic interventions. Emphasis will be placed upon the application of theories to practice, including case conceptualization and corresponding therapeutic interventions.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 662 - Autism and other Developmental Disabilities


    This is an overview of the nature, needs, and approaches that are used in rehabilitation programs that serve persons with intellectual disabilities, autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, TBI, and other central nervous system disorders. The course explores techniques used in various life stages and reviews innovative ways to overcome apathy and discrimination in community settings.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 664 - Couples Therapy


    This course is designed for students who have mastered basic counseling skills and marriage and family theory. Specific dynamics that became important when working with couples are explored. Students are asked to demonstrate the use of counseling techniques in simulated couple counseling situations.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 665 - Prevention and Intervention in Schools


    This course examines the role of school counselors in developing, implementing and evaluating prevention and interventions in P-12 schools. Trauma, crisis, violence, and other significant mental health and behavioral concerns will be explored through a comprehensive school counseling lens. A focus will be placed on social, emotional, behavioral and academic prevention and treatment models and interventions. Specific issues such as responding to school emergencies, crisis counseling and assessment, substance use, abuse and neglect, relational violence and bullying, school culture, transition needs, outreach approaches, and working with adjudicated and court mandated students will be covered.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 668 - Forensic Psychology


    This course examines the interaction between the fields of psychology and criminal justice. This course is designed to examine the many roles a psychologist might assume within the criminal justice system. This course is designed to cover several topics including eyewitness testimony, courtroom psychology, critical incident counseling, NGRI pleas and a variety of other interdisciplinary topics in order to provide students with a wealth and breadth of information. Therefore, the goal of this course is to gain a better understanding of the interaction between several disciplines that combine to create the field of Forensic Psychology.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 670 - Needs of the Aging


    Aging in our society is associated with a variety of special medical, social, and psychological needs. Participants explore these needs, as well as available rehabilitation services and agencies. The focus is on keeping the aged individual in the community.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 675 - Clinical Seminar


    This course examines mental health counseling within the confines of the medical model.Major topics include clinical assessment andtreatment planning, as well as program design and utilization of existing facilities forinpatient, outpatient, partial treatment, and aftercare.

    Credits: 3








  
  • COUN 683 - Learning Disabilities


    This course is used to examine theories of etiology and intervention models for remediation and compensation of learning disabilities. Emphasis is on adolescents and adults whose learning disorders are chronic and may include other primary handicapping conditions.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHCN 601 - Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling


    This course is an introduction to the field of rehabilitation counseling covering it’s historical foundation, philosophy, and ethical principles.  Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the philosophy and scope of practice of rehabilitation counselors and the rehabilitation process as it relates to professional ethics and legal issues for people with chronic illnesses or disabilities. Students will become familiar with counseling roles and functions across public/private settings.  The course provides an introduction to key curricular content domains in rehabilitation counseling, which are explored further in depth in subsequent courses.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHCN 684 - Rehabilitation Counseling Practicum


    The counseling practicum is the student’s initial opportunity to practice in the field or in a clinical lab setting, clinical skills in such areas as initial interviewing and intakes, testing and evaluations, gathering of diagnostic and prescriptive information, individual/group counseling, plan development, case management, coordination and placement. The practicum requires a minimum of 100 clock hours over the course of the semester. This must include 40 direct service with clients. The practicum requires students to observe and participate in all aspects of the delivery of counseling services, with an emphasis on client interaction. The practicum is an opportunity to develop and refine counseling skills, and to address important issues related to the counseling relationship (i.e., ethics, confidentiality, self-disclosure, etc.). The practicum experience is a prerequisite to the counseling internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COUN 505 - Rehabilitation Counseling and Services: History, Philosophy, Ethics, and Practice   



    Credits: 1-12








  
  • RHCN 686 - Internship in Rehabilitation Counseling


    The purpose of the internship course to help students implement counseling skills into counseling practice.  This course is designed to provide a supportive, structured learning environment for acquiring clinical experience, developing and enhancing professional competencies. The internship is a time to build a framework of new professional counseling skills on a foundation of the material learned in the program courses. Over the course of their Internship experiences students are required to complete a minimum of 600 clock hours, of which at least 240 are direct client contact.  Course topics include but are not limited to counseling skills; record keeping; legal and ethical issues; collaboration techniques; developing and evaluating programs/interventions for clients

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COUN: 505, 506, 546, 613, 682, 684



    Credits: 3-9








  
  • SCCN 601 - Foundations of School Counseling


    This course examines the history, philosophy, principles, and practices of effective 21st Century School Counselors. The primary functions of the professional school counselor and the skills necessary to meet the needs of student populations in the academic, career, and personal/social domains within the context of a comprehensive, data driven, developmental school counseling program will be explored. Students are introduced to the basic principles of working with diverse populations, school administrators, faculty, parents, and other stakeholders in elementary, middle, and high school settings. The school counselors’ role as a consultant, coordinator, leader, and advocate for Pre-K to 12 students will be explored. Students will be introduced to the ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None



    Credits: 3








  
  • SCCN 682 - Practicum in Adjustment Counseling


    This field based course gives students an opportunity to become familiar with and practice the daily responsibilities undertaken by school adjustment counselors. In a supervised environment, students are involved in all facets of school adjustment counseling. They work with students, administrators, teachers, parents, external agencies and other constituencies. They engage in individual and group interventions, counseling and actively work with students supporting social, emotional and academic needs. Students are challenged to apply classroom knowledge to the practice of school counseling. A minimum of 900 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure.

    Credits: 6-9








  
  • SCCN 684 - School Counseling Practicum


    The counseling practicum is the student’s initial opportunity to practice in the field or in a clinical lab setting, clinical skills in such areas as initial interviewing and intakes, testing and evaluations, gathering of diagnostic and prescriptive information, individual/group counseling, plan development, case management, coordination and placement. The practicum requires a minimum of 100 clock hours over the course of the semester. This must include 40 direct service with clients. The practicum requires students to observe and participate in all aspects of the delivery of counseling services, with an emphasis on client interaction. The practicum is an opportunity to develop and refine counseling skills, and to address important issues related to the counseling relationship (i.e., ethics, confidentiality, self-disclosure, etc.). The practicum experience is a prerequisite to the counseling internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SCCN 601 - Foundations of School Counseling  

    and

    COUN 682



    Credits: 3-12








  
  • SCCN 686 - Internship in School Counseling


    The purpose of the internship course to help students implement counseling skills into counseling practice.  This course is designed to provide a supportive, structured learning environment for acquiring clinical experience, developing and enhancing professional competencies. The internship is a time to build a framework of new professional counseling skills on a foundation of the material learned in the program courses. Over the course of their Internship experiences students are required to complete a minimum of 600 clock hours, of which at least 240 are direct client contact.  Course topics include but are not limited to counseling skills; record keeping; legal and ethical issues; collaboration techniques; developing and evaluating programs/interventions for clients.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COUN 622, COUN 634, COUN 631, COUN 614, COUN 613, COUN 625, COUN 629, SCCN 601, 682

    SSCN 682



    Credits: 3-12









Criminal Justice

  
  • CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    This course introduces the student to the American system of criminal justice.  Its growth and development is examined with emphasis placed on three essential components of the system: the police, courts and corrections.  Each component contributes to our understanding of the definition and measurement of crime, and various efforts to explain the causes of crime.  The following issues will be a primary focus of the course: discretion of law enforcement agents; due process; and the contemporary changes occurring within the context of the criminal justice system.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 120 - Criminal Law and Procedure


    This course covers the basic concepts of substantive criminal law and criminal procedure. Students gain knowledge of the criminal law and its procedural aspects as they relate to individuals constitutionally protected rights. The course covers the general principles of criminal liability, criminal defenses, and sentencing and punishment. Students examine structure of the legal system in the United States can understand constitutional safeguards and procedures from arrest through final disposition.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 131 - Women and Crime


    This course explores in depth three aspects of the relationship between women and crime: 1) women as offenders; 2) women as victims of crimes; 3) women as social control agents with special attention to women as police officers.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 160 - Criminal Law Concepts


    This course covers the historical development and philosophy of criminal law. Criminal law will be examined within the historical, legal, and applied contexts.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 205 - Corrections


    This course explores the historical development of correction systems.  The
    principles of correction operations, theories and methods of offender treatment 
    which may be employed within the boundaries of probation, parole, prison, capital 
    punishment and other correction alternatives are studied.  Local, state and federal correctional systems are reviewed as well as looking at the patterned behaviors of both custodial staff and inmates in the context of a controlled environment.  The concept, rationale and administration of the adult correctional  institutions will be the focal point in this introductory course.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 210 - American Court System


    This course examines the structure, organization and procedures of American courts with emphasis on the adversarial role existing between the prosecuting attorney and the defense attorney in the judicial setting.  Students also examine  the fundamental elements of both substantive and procedural law in relation to constitutional guarantees.  Historical and contemporary explanations of the American crime problem will also be analyzed in correlation with social, demographic and economic variables.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 220 - Law Enforcement


    This course focuses on the historical role of police officers and the growth and expansion of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. In contemporary America, police officers use discretion in making the following decisions (a few among many important decisions): whether to enforce a specific law, to investigate specific crimes, to stop and search, to arrest or detain an individual and whether to refer cases to the prosecuting attorney for filing of formal criminal charges. Special attention is given to the future of law enforcement in relation to terrorism and homeland security.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 239 - Ethics and Law


    This course examines the specific nature of ethics and the criminal justice system evaluates methods of ethical reasoning. Students conduct inquiries into how moral and personal beliefs influenced the relationship between criminal justice and social justice.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 240 - Criminal Procedure


    In this course, students study how constitutional law applies to the Criminal Justice System.  As current Criminal Justice students and future practitioners, it is vital to examine and understand how constitutional law has procedurally guided the manner in which criminal laws are applied.  Many important issues are reviewed, such as confessions (Miranda Warnings), searches and seizures, warrantless arrests, line-ups, and the use of force. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice  

    or CJWB 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice   



    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 250 - The Intersection of the Criminal Justice and Mental Health Systems


    This course explores best practices in which criminal justice professionals respond to individuals with mental illnesses. The course will also examine mental disorders within the ranks of law enforcement. Students are provided guidance and identification and management of dysfunctional behaviors that are indicative of reactions to emotional distress caused by mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, and other psychological and/or substance use disorders. Students learn the importance of developing effective partnerships between criminal justice professionals, mental health clinicians, and other human services professionals. The course offers students an overview of crisis intervention team training for law enforcement personnel. Students are also exposed to the workings of a community agency that provides mental health services. Finally, misconceptions, cultural differences, and attitudes about individuals with mental illnesses are reviewed.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 260 - Criminology


    A study of crime patterns, behaviors and institutional practices in addressing the crime problem is the major focus of this course.  This course examines the nature of crime in relation to the social, economic, and political processes in exploring the behaviors of individuals processed through the criminal justice system.  Structural, social, psychological and environmental approaches are frequently used in the direction of differentiating the criminal from the non-criminal.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 270 - Constitutional Law


    This course examines the historical concept of federalism.  Students compare federal and state judiciary and review the concept of stare decisis.  Most of the constitutional    
    guarantees afforded suspects will be reviewed, including but not limited to, the  
    right to confront witnesses, the privilege against self-incrimination, the right to be  
    free from illegal search and seizure, double jeopardy protection and the right to a speedy public trial.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 310 - Crime Scene Investigation


    This course discusses the practices and strategies used by law enforcement officers  
    in their daily operations.  Emphasis is placed on forensic science, as the 
    application of science to the enforcement of law, has become extremely important to policing in the twenty-first century.  Students also learn the coordination between 
    criminal justice agencies in addressing the crime problem.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 325 - Juvenile Delinquency


    The causation, control, and prevention of delinquency and offenses of young adults are
    discussed. This course exposes students to the origins and development of the juvenile justice system from historical, legal and institutional perspectives.  Youth gangs are also discussed in an effort to understand the distinction existing between the concepts of youth gangs and violent youth gangs.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 330 - Criminal Law


    This course examines the origin and nature of criminal in relation to different substantive categories of crime that are defined by lawmakers.  The substantive  criminal law contains the basic doctrines stipulating the conditions that must be met before a person can be convicted of an offense.  Of primary importance are the various conditions that, if present, may relieve an individual of responsibility for committing a crime. Students will study the penal codes of both state and federal in their efforts to define categories of offenses.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 334 - Police Administration and Leadership


    This course examines Police Department functions and oversights at the administrative level. Included are mechanisms such as inspection and internal control devices; leadership techniques; staff work; analysis; decision-making at various levels; and preparation of administrative procedural and policy guidelines.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 335 - Homeland Security and Terrorism


    This course introduces students to the challenges of the post-9/11 world, homeland security and terrorism. The course explores the process and implications of the restructuring and re-missioning of federal agencies, including the creation of the Department of Homeland Security, in response to terrorist threats. The course focuses on domestic policies and programs created to address the perils of domestic and international terrorist acts and will examine the impact of United States policies on the criminal justice system. This broad overview of homeland security and terrorism includes emergency response techniques as they apply to anthropogenic (human made) and natural disasters and identifies the challenges of security with a multicultural, democratic society.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 345 - Cyber Crime


    This course focuses on crimes of the Internet and computer crimes as well as the techniques and resources available to investigate these crimes. Topics include identity theft, cyber terrorism, cyber bullying, cyber stalking, cyber scams, and the threat to organizations through computer hacking. The course examines challenges to cyber crime investigations, including the delicate balance between the application of constitutional amendments to computer investigations and the need to protect citizens from harm, rapidly evolving computer technology, and the limitations to prosecutions of cyber crime. Protection measures, such as securing websites, strong password use, and protection of personal information will be covered. The course explores the new technology available to law enforcement to combat these rapidly evolving crimes.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 350 - Drugs, Crime and Policy


    This course examines the historical development and the current state of the use of criminal sanctions to combat the use of illicit drugs. It also offers the policy analysis of traditional and alternative ways to deal with the drug/crime connection. Specifically, it examine supply-side interventions, demand reduction, legalization, decriminalization, and harm reduction strategies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice  

    CRIM 260 - Criminology  



    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 360 - Gender, Race, and Crime


    This course examines how gender, race, and class affect criminal laws and criminal justice policies and practices. Students consider the position of females and racial minorities from the perspectives of victims, offenders, and criminal justice practitioners. Topics include racial profiling, sentencing disparities, hate crime legislation, zero-tolerance policies, the war on drugs, and intimate partner violence.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRIM 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice  

    CRIM 260 Criminology  



    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 365 - Law and Social Change


    This course analyzes formal institutions of social control and their impact on social justice and social change. It examines the question of whether the legal process can initiate and sustain social change.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 370 - Violence and Victimization


    This course identifies and analyzes individual and group violence and victimization from varied theoretical perspectives.  Emphasis is on the recent emergence of the study of victims; the types and circumstances of victimization; and the frequent violence that is generally associated with the crime.  The course also includes the causes and consequences of victimization, and the nature of the criminal justice system’s response to crime victims.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 388 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    This course explores current topic controversies arising within the field of criminal justice.  Topics and subject matter will vary from one semester to the next and reflects an in depth study of the particular issue being observed.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 391 - Independent Study


    Responding to changing currents in the field of human services, this course explores a topic of contemporary relevance. The course provides an introduction to the fundamental issues presented by the course topic.

    Credits: 1-3








  
  • CRIM 411 - Violence and Social Control in U.S. History and Society


    This course examines the nature and reaction of violence and deviance as well as the dynamics of institutions of social control. Students also study a range of violence (ethnic, political, economic, interpersonal), a range of demands (moral reform, segregation) and a range of institutions (police, militia and asylums). Its concerns are historical, sociological and practical.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 438 - Liability Issues for Public Officials


    This course examines the responsibilities and duties imposed upon public officials and public employees in the performance of their jobs as agents involved in the implementation of public policy. The legal liability of police officials, welfare case workers, counselors and others is discussed in relation to federal civil rights statutes.

    Credits: 3








  
  • CRIM 486 - Supervised Internship in Criminal Justice


    This involves an individually contracted experiential learning under the supervision of professionals within criminal justice or related systems. It is intended to assist the students in exploring and confirming career goals, as well as to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. Students engage in 45 clock hours of supervised internship per semester hour of credit.

    Credits: 3-9








  
  • CRIM 494 - Criminal Justice Senior Seminar


    Criminal Justice Senior Seminar course provides students with an opportunity to reflect broadly upon their education in the Criminal Justice major and specific competencies they have acquired through their field and experiences.  The course emphasizes the vital connection between theory, research, policy and practice in the field of criminal justice.  For criminal justice majors only. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: Graduating Senior in Criminal Justice w/a completion of at least 42 credit hours including Social Research and Evaluation (SOCI 492 - Social Research and Program Evaluation ) and all other required courses.



    Credits: 3









Dance

  
  • DANC 101 - Dance Appreciation


    This course explores dance from ancient to contemporary times through film and lecture. The objectives include broadening one’s understanding and appreciation of the dance arts and developing the ability to view dance critically.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 102 - Introduction to Dance


    This experiential course provides an introduction to dance as a personal, social, artistic and communal activity. Employing multiple intelligences, Laban Movement Analysis, and choreographic process, class activities will include experiences in dance movement fundamentals, rhythms, various dance forms, improvisation, choreography, performance, critical thinking and dance criticism. Learning experiences will include reading and written assignments, journaling, critiquing, and dance research.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 110 - Laban Movement Analysis


    This course combines movement experiences, lecture, readings, and discussion focused around concepts developed by Rudolf Laban, which include Effort, Space Harmony, Labanotation, and Bartenieff Fundamentals. The material has broad application in areas such as dance, movement, sport, fitness, education, therapy, research, and anthropology and is tailored to the needs of the individuals in the course.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 130 - Ballet Theory and Technique I


    This course provides an intensive experience in classical ballet. The primary emphasis is on learning classical ballet technique. The secondary emphasis is on appreciation of the history and aesthetics of ballet. Learning experience includes technique class two times per week, dance viewing and criticism, related readings, and discussions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PEAC 127 - Dance-Ballet l  



    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 135 - Modern and Post-Modern Dance Theory and Technique I


    This course provides an intensive experience in American modern and post-modern dance. Drawing from the numerous styles and philosophies associated with the development of American modern and post-modern dance, this course emphasizes the individual at the center of the dance experience. Classes include dance technique, improvisation, performance, readings, discussion, and video.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 150 - Jazz Dance Theory and Technique I


    Designed for the beginning dancer, this course provides an intensive experience in various styles of American jazz dance. It traces the origins of jazz dance from African, European, and American dance forms. Learning experiences include technique class two times a week plus some dance viewing, reading, lecture, and discussion.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Some dance experience or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 151 - Jazz Dance Theory and Technique II


    This course provides an intensive experience in jazz dance technique and performance.Drawing from numerous styles, the courseemphasizes individual development in thetechniques of jazz dance, swing, and African-American vernacular dance forms. Learningexperiences include technique classes twiceper week, improvisation, choreography andperformance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 150 - Jazz Dance Theory and Technique I 



    Credits: 1








  
  • DANC 160 - Movement Fundamentals and Body Practice


    This course utilizes biomechanical and structural principles to introduce students to healthy movement practices and fundamentals for injury prevention and increased mobility. Students are introduced to various body practices including but not limited to Pilates, yoga, conditioning, Somatics, Bartenieff fundamentals, and/or Gyrotonics with an anatomical and physiological approach. This course is recommended for dance majors, and open to the general education population. Open to all students interested, and strongly recommended for those studying physical education, athletic training, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and exercise science

    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 161 - Modern and Post Modern Dance Theory and Technique II


    This course provides an intensive experience in the study of modern dance and post-modern dance. Drawing from numerous styles, thecourse emphasizes individual development in various techniques and performance.Learning experiences include techniqueclasses twice per week, improvisation,contact improvisation, choreography,performance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 135 - Modern and Post-Modern Dance Theory and Technique I 



    Credits: 1








  
  • DANC 180 - African Dance Theory and Technique


    The course provides a background of African dance forms with historical linkages through dance movement based within the Afro-American, Caribbean and Latin American setting; providing students with the core fundamentals for the execution and performance of this dynamic art form. Ceremonial dance, including festival, war, court, and ritual forms as well as social and processional forms practiced in Africa and the African Diaspora will be explored. Students will develop a mental, emotional, and aesthetic awareness of the performance of various African derived dance forms.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 181 - Ballet Theory and Technique II


    This course provides an intensive experience in classical ballet. The primary emphasis is on developing proficiency in classical ballet technique and performance. Learning experiences include technique class, choreography and performance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 130 - Ballet Theory and Technique I 



    Credits: 1








  
  • DANC 184 - Dance Performance Practicum


    This course bridges the gap between class activity and artistic production. Students choreograph a major group dance for inclusion in an on-campus performance.  Readings, dance viewing, discussion, and writings are also part of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 215 - Choreography I  

    and

    DANC 216 - Choreography II  



    Credits: 1 - 2








  
  • DANC 185 - Dance Performance Practicum


    This course bridges the gap between class activity and artistic performance. Students are involved either with one of the on-campus performing dance groups or with an approved off-campus experience.  Readings, dance viewing, discussion, and writings are also part of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Some dance experience.



    Credits: .5








  
  • DANC 201 - Teaching Dance


    This course explores materials and methods for teaching dance in various contexts with diverse populations. Emphasis is placed on development of individual teaching skill and creativity, exploration of the foundations of dance, and design and implementation of an effective dance curriculum. Learning experiences include learning and teaching dance; movement exploration and problem-solving; analysis of motor development, creativity, and teaching methods; acquaintance with materials for teaching dance; and curriculum design.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 110 - Laban Movement Analysis  

    Dance majors 

    Dance minors.



    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 210 - Short Term Study Abroad in Italy


    This course is designed to introduce students to the historical development of dance as a theater art through an international and cultural perspective.  Studies of Italian folk and court dance forms, ballet, Renaissance art, architecture, music, and history will be explored through reading, writing, discussion, research, field trips, dance class, and choreography studies.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 215 - Choreography I


    This course explores creative processes and strategies for dance-making. Emphasis is placed on developing individual creativity, exploring the elements of choreography, and making and critiquing dances. Learning experiences include improvisation, creation of solo and group dance studies, analyzing the choreographic process, critiquing dances, and consideration of production aspects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Dance experience

    DANC 110 - Laban Movement Analysis  



    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 216 - Choreography II


    This course explores the craft of choreography in making small and large group dances. Emphasis is placed on developing individual creative process, exploring movement invention, form, content, and dance production. Learning experiences include improvising, problem solving, critiquing, journal writing, research, music listening, attending arts events, casting, rehearsing, and coaching. Dance studies created in this course may be further developed for public performance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 110 - Laban Movement Analysis  

    DANC 215 - Choreography I  



    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 260 - Dance and Somatic Movement Therapy


    This course introduces students to the professions of dance/movement therapy and somatic movement therapy. It covers the history and development of the fields, provides experiences in various approaches, and explores applications in various settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 110 - Laban Movement Analysis  

    and

    some dance experience.



    Credits: 3








  
  • DANC 284 - Dance Repertory Company


    This course provides an intensive year-long learning experience and dance repertory performance. Is designed to cultivate artistic development of dance majors and minors three preprofessional, cohesive, dance ensemble. The repertory dance Company performs commissioned and reconstructed works in multiple settings; college, concerts, special events, and also tours off-campus to local and regional venues. Participants work closely with the artistic director and professional guest artist to create, learn, rehearsed, prepare and sustain the repertory works. This course fulfills a dance major and dance minor selective requirements and is repeatable up eight semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 110 - Laban Movement Analysis 

    and

    DANC 185 - Dance Performance Practicum 



    Credits: 1








  
  
  • DANC 386 - Field Experience - Dance


    Supervised field experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course is repeatable for a maximum of up to 10 credits.



    Credits: 1-10








 

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