Apr 19, 2024  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Psychology

  
  • PSYC 681 - Work Group Dynamics


    This course is designed to teach students how to be effective work team members and leaders. Students learn the theoretical and experiential aspects of the dynamics of work groups. By forming intact semester project work teams, students actively assess work group dynamics and behaviors, practice inter- and intra-group communications, manage group conflicts, and develop group facilitation and leadership skills.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 682 - Practicum in School Adjustment Counseling


    This field based course gives students an opportunity to become familiar with and practice the daily responsibilities undertaken by school adjustment counselors. In a supervised environment, students are involved in all facets of school adjustment counseling. They work with students, administrators, teachers, parents, external agencies and other constituencies. They engage in individual and group interventions, counseling and actively work with students supporting social, emotional and academic needs. Students are challenged to apply classroom knowledge to the practice of school counseling. A minimum of 900 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure.

    Prerequisites & Notes





    Credits: 12-Mar








  
  • PSYC 683 - Ethical School Counseling Practicum Seminar


    In this course students engaged in their school guidance or school adjustment counseling practicum, discuss their work, and receive group supervision. Students learn about the ethical and legal guidelines relevant to school counseling, and the steps required to resolve typical dilemmas, including mandatory reporting, confidentiality, school records, grouping, professional obligations and limitations, special education law, and children’s rights to schooling.

    Prerequisites & Notes





    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 685 - Counseling Practicum


    This course provides an opportunity for skill-building experience in the application of counseling methods in a closely supervised laboratory situation. Each student is seen individually and in group seminar on a weekly basis for discussion and videotape evaluation of counseling interviews.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 686 - Fieldwork/Internship and Seminar


    Supervised field experience is considered to be an integral part of preparation for professional activity. The specific nature of the fieldwork/ internship experience varies with the submajor and goals of the student and depends upon approval by the respective graduate program director. Students receive regular supervision from competent professionals in the field and attend a weekly fieldwork/internship seminar with the faculty. Each semester hour of credit is based upon fifty clock hours of fieldwork/internship plus a weekly one-and-a-half hour seminar. The minimum number of credits required varies with the submajor.

    Credits: 1-16








  
  • PSYC 687 - Advanced Counseling Practicum


    Advanced counseling you give students the opportunity to gain experience in the application of theory to practice and to enhance counseling skills. Students participate in individual counseling with undergraduate students, receive supervision, and review video recorded sessions with the faculty supervisor and classmates. Students enhance and refine their counseling skills of individual practice, group interaction, supervision, and structured learning opportunities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYD major

    and





    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 688 - Special Topics


    Special Topics

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 708 - Cognition and Affect


    This course provides an overview of cognitive and affective bases of behavior. Students gain an understanding of how humans process information and organize emotional experiences. There is a focus on application of major models and theories to real-world understanding and implications for practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PsyD students only



    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 709 - Social Psychology


    This course acquaints students with the principles and processes of social psychology. Topics to be covered include, but will not be limited to, attraction, aggression, prejudice, conformity, persuasion, and so forth. Upon completion of this course, students should have a basic understanding of how individuals think about, are influenced by and relate to one another.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 710 - Foundations and Methodology of Social Inquiry


    This course broadly emphasizes the search for truth and the ways in which this search is conducted. The overall goal of this course is to provide doctoral students in counseling psychology with knowledge and ability to conceptualize and formulate research and social inquiry. The goal of this course is to provide the opportunity to reflect and deepen your understanding about foundational research concepts including epistemology, truth, identity, ethics, and validity, as well as to broaden your knowledge about research methodologies and methods. The course also aims to increase your capacity to critically examine research findings as informed consumers, and improve your skills at conceptualizing and developing your dissertation or a formal research study. You will also learn how to critically review literature, formulate research questions, to become familiar with various research orientations such as quantitative, qualitative, mixed-method and (participatory) action research, as well as engage with critical dialogues about research concepts and process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Admission to the PSYD programs





    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 713 - Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Psychology


    This course is for doctoral students in counseling psychology and focuses on developing sensitivity to the ethical aspects of their work as future psychologists. Students deepen their knowledge and understanding of professional ethics and standards of psychological practice, teaching and research. Ethical problems, decision making, principle and virtue ethics in an increasingly diverse and complex environment are considered. Students also consider professional issues such as opening a private practice and benchmark standards for the training of psychologists.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Admission to PSYD program



    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 714 - Counseling Psychology in Diverse Contexts: Social Action, Collaboration and Community Experience


    This doctoral course explores the questions, theories, and methods underpinning counseling psychology’s focus on social-contextual factors that shape individual and community wellbeing. Students explore and critique selected theory and research in the area of cultural diversity and social justice in counseling psychology. Students spend approximately four to six hours each week working in community-based sites in order to develop their skills in areas such as prevention, consultation, interprofessional collaboration, and advocacy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Admission to PSYD program

    and

    successful completion of



    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 715 - Research Methods


    The goal of this course is to provide doctoral students in counseling with the opportunity to refine their understanding of research methods, increase their ability to be informed consumers of research findings, and improve their skills at developing research proposals. Students develop their skills in survey and analysis of research and program evaluation procedures. They learn how to critically review literature, and formulate questions, and they learn about quantitative and qualitative methodology, and data analysis as a foundation for reading research literate and generating research proposals.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Admission to the PSYD program

    and successful completion of

    and





    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 716 - History and Systems of Psychology


    History and Systems of Psychology

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 718 - Qualitative Research in Psychological Research


    This course provides a survey of qualitative methods of inquiry applicable to psychology including outcome and program evaluation.Within the framework of this course, the philosophic basis, major paradigms, models of collecting empirical materials, interpretation and evaluation of empirical methods, and presentation of qualitative researched are reviewed.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 720 - Dissertation Seminar


    This course is designed to assist students with developing and finalizing their dissertation research proposal. Activities include reviewing extant literature, writing a critical review of the literature, designing an empirical research study, collecting data, analyzing data, and developing methodology related to collecting and analyzing data. Students work as part of a team and share and receive feedback on their own research ideas and in the development of the dissertation proposal. Students learn firsthand about scientific inquiry in psycgology through research under the guidance of faculty members.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 724 - Psychological Statistics for Counseling Psychologists


    This course provides the foundation in the statistical techniques used in scientific and counseling psychology. Specific topics covered include an overview of basic statistics, choosing the correct statistic for research questions, descriptive statistics, statistical techniques for relationships ( i.e., correlation, multiple regressions and factor analysis), statistical techniques for comparing groups ( i.e. T-tests, ANOVA, MANOVA, and ANCOVA), and statistical approaches for multiple variables (i.e. path analysis and structural equation modeling). Students will receive instruction in the use of SPSS and Amos modeling software.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 725 - Advanced Group Counseling


    This course addresses major concepts, theoretical perspectives, research, professional issues, and skill development related to effective group counseling. The theory, research, and practice of work group work, especially group counseling, is discussed, demonstrated, and practiced. Students learn about the history of group work, principles of group dynamics and group process, and group techniques. Ethical practices and guidelines of multicultural competencies for group counselors are presented. Different types of groups (i.e. psychotherapy, counseling, support, task, guidance), and theme-based groups that are conducted in community settings are discussed. Group skills are practiced throughout the semester employing a small group model. This experience offer significant potential for emotional and intellectual growth, for you are given the opportunity to experience for yourself the power of a group.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 727 - Cognitive Assessment


    This course features instruction and supervised practice in the administration and interpretation of the Wechsler scales. The history, purpose, interpretation, strengths, and weaknesses of these scales are reviewed. Each student gives no less than five tests on each of the Wechsler scales (WAIS, WISC-R, WPPIS). A total of twenty satisfactory tests are required. The course format includes lecture, demonstrations, and videotaped testing sessions.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 730 - Doctoral Dissertation


    This course involves meeting with a faculty supervisor and completing the Doctoral Dissertation. Students submit a culminating dissertationin approved form and participate in a dissertation defense meeting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Acceptance to the PSYD program

    and

    the successful completion of:





    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 733 - Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy


    This course involves in-depth exploration and examination of major concepts and practices of therapeutic systems employed in counseling practice. Students expand on basic knowledge of major approaches to counseling and build on basic counseling skills introduced in previous courses to move to a higher level of application and mastery.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 736 - Supervision and Consultation


    The purpose of this course is to examine techniques and issues involved with the supervision of counselors and in providing consultation services to mental health agencies and other organizations. Models and approaches to supervision and consultation are explored. Issues related to administration and teaching relevant skills are discussed. Students have opportunities to learn and practice supervision, administration, teaching, and consultation skills.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 739 - Advanced Human Life Span Development


    This course explores life span development through the lenses of social, cultural, cognitive, biological, and learning theories and research. The emphasis is on gaining better conceptual understanding of healthy development and better practical understanding of how to help children, adolescents, and adults address the developmental issues they face across the lifespan. There is a particular focus placed on understanding the impact of the family and culture on the individual. Attention will also be devoted to the application of research findings to ongoing developmental problems.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 743 - Work and Career Psychology


    This course is an advanced, doctoral level seminar in work and career psychology (including vocational psychology, career counseling, and career development). Work is a central component in human life and creates meaning for individuals while providing sustenance for life. As such, work psychology is a core component of psychological services and understanding of the individual. Therefore, this course builds on knowledge of counseling processes and life-span development while introducing students to the psychological and political dynamics that are part of the human experience of work and career through two processes: 1) course content and participation and 2) a community-learning component infused with a social justice perspective. Through course work and application, students gain knowledge in the areas of career theory, intervention, assessment,and special topics related to diversity and intersectionality in work with regards to persons of color, women, LGBT individuals, individuals with disabling conditions, working class adults, and non-college bound youth. Students apply theories and interventions toward their community-learning projects while additionally reflecting and discussing areas of social justice and barriers to career development among underserved populations.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 751 - Physiological Psychology


    The physiological bases of a variety of behaviors are studied. Scientific experimental analysis concerned with sensory processing, learning, motivation, and the development of the major schools and issues in perception are considered. The biological concomitants of various psychological abnormalities are analyzed.

    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 753 - Personality Assessment


    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of major personality assessments, including theory and application of these measures. Students develop skills in choosing, administering, scoring, and interpreting both objective and projective measures of personality.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  • PSYC 785 - Doctoral Practicum I


    Students work in applied settings and receive doctoral level supervision, integrating theoretical and empirical work in counseling with real-life experiences. Students provide individual, relational, and/or group counseling to a diverse population; conduct intake assessments; participate in case conferences; provide case management as appropriate; and complete requisite case documentation. Students utilize client feedback measures to inform their counseling and to reflect on their development as ethical, effective counselors.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Acceptance intothe PSYD program

    and successful completion of

    COUN 622 - Counseling Theories    

    and

    PSYC 685 - Counseling Practicum    



    Credits: 6-12








  
  • PSYC 786 - Doctoral Practicum II


    This is an advanced doctoral practicum experience in which students continue to develop and enhance their counseling skills. In addition to provision of community based individual, group, and/or relational counseling, students may participate in such advanced training opportunities as structured psychological assessment, consultation, and/or supervision.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 785 - Doctoral Practicum I   



    Credits: 1-12








  
  • PSYC 787 - Pre-Doctoral Internship


    The pre-doctoral internship is the culminating field experience of the PsyD in counseling psychology program. It involves a one-year full-time placement at an approved site. Students can clinical experience, develop counseling skills, and begin to establish a professional identity. Students are held to the same expectations as other full-time employees and counseling staff at the internship site. (Course is taken twice for a total of 1.0 credit)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Acceptance into the PSYD program

    and successful completion of

    and





    Credits: 4.5








  
  • PSYC 788 - Fieldwork


    Students discuss advanced theoretical and empirical topics identified by students and faculty members. Students also work in applied settings. Receives supervision via a weekly fieldwork/internship seminar. Each semester hour of credit is based upon 50 clock hours of fieldwork/internship.

    Credits: 1-3








  
  • PSYC 789 - Doctoral Practicum III


    This is an advanced practicum experience for students who wish to gain either additional counseling experience or specialized training in a particular area of competence. Possible specializations might include neuropsychological assessment, IQ or personality assessment, consultation, program development, etc.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 786 - Doctoral Practicum II  



    Credits: 1-6









Rehabilitation and Disability Studies

  
  • CMDS 662 - Aural Rehabilitation


    This course introduces students to thehabilitation and rehabilitation of adults and children who are deaf or hard of hearing.Assessment and therapy procedures related toauditorytraining,speechreading,assistivetechnology, speech/language/communication facilitation, hearing aid training, andcochlear implant therapy are taught. Educational management, counseling strategies and consultation models are presented.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101

    CMDS 239

    CMDS 455

    and

    CMDS 456/



    Credits: 3








  
  • HSRS 620 - Health Care Statistics


    Students learn the general principles ofhealth care and epidemiologic statistics with an emphasis on understanding publishedquantitative research in health care andmedicine. The knowledge needed to interpret descriptive and inferential statistics including group comparisons and regression is included. Students learn when and howstatistics are used, how to critically appraise the statistics used in journalarticles, and how to interpret basic software generated statistical output.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 126 - Principles of Rehabilitation


    This course is an introduction to the rehabilitation process of persons with disabilities, including history and background, related legislation, basic principles, and philosophy. Also considered are the steps in the rehabilitation process, historical attitudes toward persons with disabilities, the medical model, independent living programs, the nature of the helping process, and the range of professions in the field of rehabilitation.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 230 - Psychology of Disability and Illness


    The purpose of this course is to increase students’ knowledge of the psycho-social aspects of disability and to assist them in gaining an understanding of a wide variety of disabling conditions and individual adjustments in relation to disability.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 240 - Independent Living Rehabilitation


    This course stresses a task analysis approach to rehabilitation instruction of individuals with impairments and multiple handicaps. Students are exposed to designs which are used to motivate, facilitate, support, and monitor the growth of individuals with disabilities toward the ultimate criterion of independent living.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 - Principles of Rehabilitation  

    or

    RHDS 230 - Psychology of Disability and Illness  



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 290 - Professional Skills Development


    In this course, students are provided an introduction to issues of personal and career development. Personal values and their relationship to career decision-making are considered. Also investigated is the range of job-seeking skills, career-readiness training, and career-development theories. This is essentially an experiential course and requires active participation by the students.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 - Principles of Rehabilitation  

    or

    RHDS 230 - Psychology of Disability and Illness  



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 370 - Interviewing and Case Study Methods


    In this course, students are provided with both a familiarization and skill development of a variety of interviewing and case development techniques, the rationale behind them, and an evaluation of their applicability with respect to persons with different disabilities. This course is designed primarily as a prerequisite for rehabilitation fieldwork assignments with consumers who have handicaps and disabilities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 378 - Introduction to Manual Communication/Issues of Deaf Culture


    Designed as an introduction to sign language, fingerspelling, and deaf culture, this course presents a brief history of American sign language and related systems. Students learn etiologies of hearing loss and develop an appreciation for an alternative culture as they develop beginning sign language skills.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 379 - Manual Communication and Culture


    This course promotes advanced skill development in the use of visual/ gestural sign language for a clearer understanding of the rule structure of American Sign Language. The dynamics and cultural mores of deaf culture are further explored. Students attain mastery of syntax and pragmatics with manual/gestural language.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 378 - Introduction to Manual Communication/Issues of Deaf Culture  

    or

    equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 384 - Practicum in Rehabilitation Services


    This course is an individually contracted, practical experience under professional supervision in a rehabilitation setting. It is intended to assist the student in exploring and confirming career goals. Students engage in forty-five to fifty clock hours of supervised practicum per semester hour of credit.

    Credits: 3-6








  
  • RHDS 386 - Rehabilitation Internship


    This course is an individually contracted work experience as a member of a rehabilitation team. It is intended to provide students with an opportunity to apply theory in the design, provision, and administration of client services. Supervision is provided in conjunction with qualified rehabilitation agency personnel.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 384 - Practicum in Rehabilitation Services  

    and

    departmental chairperson approval.



    Credits: 1-18








  
  • RHDS 392 - Independent Study in RHDS


    Independent Study

    Credits: 1-10








  
  • RHDS 402 - Implication of Disability for the Family


    The focus of this course is on understanding the world view of the parent, child, sibling, or spouse of a person with a disability. A family system approach is used in examining problems in readjustment to disability and the effectiveness of coping strategies. Students examine the goals of interventions, including support of the family unit and its individual members.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 426 - Vocational Evaluation, Assessment, and Report Writing


    Students acquire knowledge of the basic philosophies, practices, and processes of vocational evaluation and assessment as applied to various consumer populations in this course. Students gain understanding of specific instruments and clinical skills needed to provide meaningful and successful services.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 430 - Children with Disabilities


    In this course, students are provided with an understanding of the interdisciplinary primary-care and community-based services required for the practical management of children with physical disabilities, multiple-handicaps, and chronic illnesses from birth through childhood. Attention is given to the screening, diagnosis, and evaluation of the high-risk infant; behavioral and emotional implications of terminal illness; development of comprehensive early intervention treatment and educational plans; and support mechanisms that are helpful to families.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 442 - Behavioral Techniques for the Developmentally Disabled


    This course is an introduction to the principles of applied behavior analysis, with attention to effectiveness with developmentally disabled youths and adults. The case study approach provides guidelines for solving specific problems. Students design and implement behavior modification programs for various rehabilitation settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 - Principles of Rehabilitation  

    or

    RHDS 230 - Psychology of Disability and Illness  



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 450 - Action-Oriented Therapies


    This course provides an opportunity to examine, discuss, and experience several of the action-oriented therapies currently in use in many rehabilitation facilities serving physically disabled adults, exceptional children, and geriatric patients. Action-oriented therapies employ nonverbal modes of interacting including, games, drama, free play, movement, music, art, or other activities. Students explore these as therapeutic modalities in which many conflicts are resolved. Emphasis is on the use of these techniques to enhance intellectual and emotional functioning for more effective independent living and rehabilitation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 or RHDS 230.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 463 - Speech and Hearing Science


    The purpose of this course is to introducestudents interested in CommunicationsDisorders to the speech and hearing sciences. The physical and psychoacoustic aspeacts ofsound will be related to the neurological,anatomical and perceptual characteristics of speech and communications.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 464 - Autism and other Developmental Disabilities


    This course is an overview of the nature, needs, and approaches that are used in rehabilitation programs that serve persons with intellectual disabilities, autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, TBI, and other central nervous system disorders. The course explores techniques used in various life stages and reviews innovative ways to overcome apathy and discrimination in community settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 - Principles of Rehabilitation  

    or

    RHDS 230 - Psychology of Disability and Illness  



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 469 - Behavioral Medicine


    This course is designed to present the spectrum of mind-body behavioral health techniques. Meditation, stress management, self-hypnosis, relaxation, biofeedback, and spirituality techniques are taught. Applications to disabling conditions involving both chronic disease and chronic pain are emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 470 - Needs of the Aging


    Aging is associated in our society with a variety of special medical, social, and psychological needs. Students explore these needs, as well as available rehabilitation services and agencies. The focus is on keeping the aged individual in the community. There is a short field experience required for all students.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 471 - Therapeutic Approaches with the Aging


    This course familiarizes students with the variety of rehabilitative techniques available to help reverse debilitation and disorientation often associated with aging and to help maintain maximal functioning in the late years.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 470



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 475 - Integrated Medicine


    This course surveys the major health care traditions and selected complementary therapies. Emphasis is placed on the responsible integration of practices including Ayurveda, chiropractic, herbalism, massage, mind-body medicine, music therapy, Reiki, and yoga with conventional Western biomedicine options in the prevention, diagnosis, and healing of chronic disabling conditions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 476 - Employee-Assistance Programming


    This course explores the knowledge, issues, and techniques of establishing, maintaining, and evaluating employee-assistance programs. Approaches to dealing with various worker problems, emotional and mental health, marital, family, financial, and other problems affecting attendance and productivity are considered. Organizational as well as therapeutic factors and their interrelationships are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 or RHDS 230.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 480 - Special Topics in RHDS Issues and Techniques


    Special Topics

    Credits: 3-6








  
  • RHDS 483 - Learning Disabilities


    This course examines theories of etiology and intervention models for remediation and compensation of learning disabilities. Emphasis is on those adolescents and adults whose learning disorders are chronic and may include other primary handicapping conditions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior status.



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 489 - Cardiac Rehabilitation


    This course familiarizes students with the fundamental principles and current practices of cardiac rehabilitation. The types and causes of disability in cardiac disease, as well as diagnostic evaluation techniques, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on a continuum of medical, surgical, psychosocial, and vocational management, from the acute recovery period to post-hospital rehabilitation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 - Principles of Rehabilitation  

    or

    RHDS 230 - Psychology of Disability and Illness  



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 491 - Neurological Conditions


    This course is intended to familiarize students with the major issues in the field of neurological and cognitive rehabilitation. As the number of adolescents, young adults, and elderly who survive brain injury has increased, so has there been an increased demand for rehabilitation professionals with knowledge and skills in this area. The emphases of this course are on the causes, symptoms, and especially the treatment methods for neurological injury.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 492 - Group Process in Rehabilitation


    This course presents an overview of the major counseling techniques used with rehabilitation clients in group situations. The integration of group counseling theory in specific rehabilitation settings is also emphasized. Active participation by all students is presumed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or Senior status.

     



    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 494 - Mental Health Issues in Rehabilitation


    This course is an overview of major issues and treatment methods used in the rehabilitation of the psychiatric client. Primary emphasis is given to the range of counseling techniques, the use of psychoactive medication, and the inter-disciplinary nature of services within the community. Rehabilitation diagnosis techniques and vocational rehabilitation strategies are also discussed.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 590 - Substance Use Disorder Studies Institute


    Substance Use Disorder Studies Institute

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 590 - Substance Use Disorder Studies Institute


    Substance Use Disorder Studies Institute

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 635 - Counseling and Consultation Theories


    Students are provided with an overview of counseling theories and practices as they pertain to the rehabilitation process. Emphasis is given to the students’ development of counseling skills and techniques which are used to influence and support consumer change and rehabilitation efforts.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 675 - Integrated Medicine


    This course surveys the major health care traditions and selected complementary therapies. Emphasis is placed on the responsible integration of practices including Ayureveda, chiropractic, herbalism, massage, mind-body medicine, music therapy, Reiki, and yoga with conventional Western biomedicine options in the prevention, diagnosis, and healing of disabling conditions.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 684 - Rehabilitation Counseling Practicum


    This course is a supervised experience in anapproved rehabilitation setting. Theexperience includes increasing responsibility in counseling, rehabilitation planning andcoordination.A minimum of one hundredclock hours during the semester with at least 40-50 clock hours in direct contact servicework with persons with chronic illnesses ordisabilities arerequired.A review of counseling interviews and casework by an approved facultyand/or clinical supervisor is also required. The course is restricted to students inrehabilitation counseling and services.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RHDS 686 - Rehabilitation Internship


    This course is a part-time or full-timeinternship of 600 total clock hours in an intensive andpractical learning experience in anappropriate rehabilitation center, hospital, school, or agency, for students doingadvanced graduate work in rehabilitationcounseling. Through direct service work,which is supplemented with individual andgroup supervision, students are provided anopportunity to demonstrate and perfectskills and competencies related to his orher respective rehabilitation counselingand services program.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 10-Jan









Religion

  
  • RELI 103 - Introduction to the Old Testament


    This course introduces students to the content of the Old Testament and, through a study of literary, historical, and theological issues, focuses on the Old Testament’s contribution to Western culture.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 104 - Religion in America


    This course is a study of religious thought and institutions and their influence on American culture. It focuses on major denominations and thinkers in this country, from the seventeenth century to the present.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 106 - New Testament: Christian Scripture


    This course introduces the students to the literature of the New Testament, noting the historical and theological dimensions of this literature as well as its significance for the modern world.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 109 - Religions of the World


    Religions of the World is an introduction to several religious traditions of the world. The course examines the history, key teachings, major rituals, and contemporary practices of each religion and religious practitioners.  Traditions studied include, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Sikhism.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 140 - Introduction to Judaism


    This course is a survey of the history of the Jewish people and an analysis of the literature and institutions of Judaism, noting their contributions to contemporary life.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 205 - Religions of Ancient and Classical India


    This course is a religion-culture study of the Indian sub-continent, with special emphasis upon the emergence of the Hindu tradition and the development of non-Hindu systems in response to it.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 208 - Indian Buddhism and the Buddhist Tradition


    This course introduces the student to the history, philosophy, and culture of Buddhism. The critique of Brahmanical and non-Brahmanical systems, the life of the Buddha, the rise of the monastic institution, and the development of philosophical and meditational theories are presented. In addition, discussion focuses on the emergence of the Buddhist tradition in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, and China, as well as on the relationship of Buddhism to contemporary life.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 210 - Interfaith Studies: Engaging in a Religiously Diverse World


    This course develops students’ practical skills of interfaith understanding and engagement.  The class begins with an introduction to interfaith work in a range of contexts, followed by a brief exploration into definitions of ‘interfaith’.  The bulk of the course is organized around several key themes in Interfaith Studies, such as: interpersonal interfaith engagement, religious diversity in civic spaces, interfaith conflict, and social justice and interfaith activism.  In each theme-based unit of the course, we will study case studies with the intention of understanding the history and nature of interfaith interactions.  Students will ask questions about how religious communities bridge those differences?  What challenges do they have?

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 215 - Contemporary Catholicism


    This course is a study of global contemporary Catholicism.  The goal of the class is to engage students in examining how Catholicism is lived around the world.  Topics include prayer, interreligious communities, race and ethnicity, modernity, family life and gender.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 223 - Religion and Sports


    In the United States, sports and religion are intertwined.  This class is an exploration of the intersections, overlaps, and incongruities between religion and sports in the United States.  The course begins with a brief historical overview of how religion and sports have interacted in the U.S.  Then we examine several case studies that aim to help us think about how, why, and where religion and sports shape one another.  During this course, students will analyze the relationship between sports and religion in the U.S.; investigate how individuals and communities interpret the role of sports in religious identities; consider how culture affects religion - and how religion affects culture.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 226 - Religion, Health, and Healing


    This course will add diversity to our current offerings in Religion as well as in the spritual-ethical dimensions for the general education curriculum. This class takes health and healing as an entree into thinking about issues of religious diversity, religion and health care, as well as religious perspectives on healing. Students will be able to delve into new perspectives on religion through this course.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 288 - Special Topics in Religion


    Responding to changing currents in the field of religion, this course explores a topic of contemporary relevance.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 422 - Christianity and Modern Society


    This course is a study of the ethical principles of Christianity as they relate to the social, political, and economic problems of the present day.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RELI 424 - The Life and Teachings of Jesus


    This course is a social-historical examination of the record of Jesus’ life and thought, with attention to the present-day significance of his message.

    Credits: 3









Research

  
  • RSCH 141 - Guided Individual Study


    This course provides undergraduate students the opportunity to work individually under the supervision of an instructor to further their own personal and professional development. The normal registration is for two semester hours per semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Approval by the chairperson of the department concerned and by the instructor who has agreed to act as supervisor.



    Credits: 2-6








  
  • RSCH 610 - Foundations and Methods of Research


    This course emphasizes the search for truth and the ways in which this search is conducted. It includes the identification and delineation of research problems, survey of related literature, detailed examination of different research methods, and basic descriptive and inferential statistical coverage. Attention is given to the presentation of research results in acceptable form. Required of all master’s degree students.

    Credits: 3








  
  • RSCH 610 - Fundamentals and Methods of Research


    Fundamentals and Methods of Research

    Credits: 3








  
  • RSCH 612 - Proposal Design


    This course assists the students in completing their proposal for either a thesis or research project that leads to a Master of Science Degree (MS). Students are required to complete the full proposal within the context of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    ATPY majors should have the following prerequisites:

    and

    or





    Credits: 2








  
  • RSCH 615 - Qualitative Research Methodology


    This course examines the nature of qualitative research methodology. Within the framework of this course, the philosophic basis, major paradigms, strategies of inquiry, methods of collecting empirical materials, interpretation and evaluation of empirical materials, and presentation of qualitative research are renewed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RSCH 610 - Fundamentals and Methods of Research 



    Credits: 3








  
  • RSCH 615 - Qualitative Research Methodology


    This course examines the nature of qualitative research methodology. Within the framework of this course, the philosophic basis, major paradigms, strategies of inquiry, methods of collecting empirical materials, interpretation and evaluation of empirical materials, and presentation of qualitative research are renewed.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    ATPY majors should also have the following prerequisite:





    Credits: 3








  
  • RSCH 618 - Guided Individual Study


    Graduate students with special needs, interests, and capacities conduct individual study under faculty supervision involving library work, tutorial work, research, independent reading or writing, or other approved study which contributes to the educational growth of a particular student. This course is not a substitute for, nor a part of, the thesis requirement.

    Credits: 1-6








  
  • RSCH 620 - Educational and Psychological Statistics I


    This course covers statistical analysis methods for descriptive, correlational, and experimental designs. Descriptive statistics, linear regression, introduction to multiple regression, t-ratio, analysis of variance for independent and repeated measures designs, factorial designs, chi square, and non-parametric measures are included. Students receive instruction in the use of SPSS at the Academic Computer Center.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Course in elementary statistics

    and

    ATPY majors should also have the following prerequisite:





    Credits: 3








  
  • RSCH 625 - Independent Study Proposal Design


    This seminar assists students in completing their independent study proposal for a Master in Education (M.Ed.) degreewithin the School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Students are required to complete the full proposal and prepare for data collection for their study.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 2








  
  • RSCH 626 - Research Project


    A research study is organized and conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and presented in approved form for retention by the department in which the study is completed. Required for PLAN C master’s students.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RSCH 610 - Fundamentals and Methods of Research  

    Open only to matriculatedstudents.



    Credits: 2-4








  
  • RSCH 626 - Research Project


    A research study is organized and conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and presented in approved form for retention by the department in which the study is completed. Required for PLAN C master’s students.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    Open only to degree students.



    Credits: 4-Feb








  
  • RSCH 635 - Thesis


    This course involves meetings with the thesis committee and satisfactory completion of thesis requirements including the oral examination. Students must register for a total of four semester hours.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RSCH 612 - Proposal Design   



    Credits: 4-12








  
  • RSCH 712 - Proposal Design


    This course assists the students in completing their proposal for a dissertation that leads to the Doctor of Physical Education Degree. Students are required to complete the full proposal within the context of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 2








  
  • RSCH 720 - Educational Psychology Statistics II


    This course covers the foundations of advanced correlational and experimental statistical procedures. The course focuses on Regression Analysis as the foundation for advanced statistical procedures. An introduction to coding procedures and matrix algebra is included. Experimental design topics include Factorial Designs (Independent Groups, Repeated Measures, and Mixed Factorials), Analysis of Covariance, MANOVA, Discriminant Function Analysis, and Power Analysis. In addition, reliability and validity issues related to experimental designs are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3








  
  • RSCH 730 - Advanced Experimental Designs


    This course covers research design issues and statistical analyses appropriate for advanced experimental designs. Topics includeFactorial Designs (Independent Groups,Repeated Measures, and Mixed Factorials),Analysis of Covariance, MANOVA, DiscriminantFunction Analysis, and Power Analysis. Inaddition, reliability and validity issuesrelated to experimental designs areaddressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 2








  
  • RSCH 735 - Doctoral Dissertation


    An original contribution to knowledge or an application of existing knowledge to the solution of a practical problem in the field is made. Students must register for a total of 14 credits.

    Credits: 1-14








  
  • RSCH 740 - Introduction to Structural Equation Modeling


    This course provides the student with an introduction to and overview of Structural Equation Modeling. The course will provide an overview of the basis for structural equation modeling including a description of Path Analysis, Mediation Analysis, Exploratory Factor Analysis and Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Additionally, the basic concepts, applications and software applications used for SEM will be covered. This course is offered as an on-line course.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 2









Science Education

  
  • SCIE 144 - Best Practices in Learning and Teaching Science


    This course combines theory and practice of learning and teaching science. Students learn selected principles of science compatible with the Curriculum Frameworks of Science by constructing their own understanding of them. Using differentiated instruction methodology for teaching science, students apply their own understanding about these principles to teaching elementary children and pre-school children with a variety of learning styles and abilities. Along with the field experiences, students will visit different institution types to observe science taught in different settings and to different age groups.

    Credits: 4









Social Work

  
  • MSSW 601 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment 1


    This course introduces systems theory and person-in-environment as the conceptual framework for the HBSE sequence. It addresses the ecological context of human development with attention to cognitive, psychological, and social development and the individual’s membership in the family, as well as in groups, organizations, and the community. Particular emphasis is given to gender, race, class, and culture.

    Credits: 3








 

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