Jun 13, 2024  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Drama

  
  • DRAM 101 - Introduction to the Theater


    This is an introduction to the appreciation and study of theater, including play reading and playwriting, acting, directing, designing for the stage, theater history and the theater of different cultures.  Learning experiences include small group presentations, video viewing, workshops and demonstrations in theater practice, discussions and writings about plays and the theater, and attendance at a live theatrical event.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DRAM 110 - Introduction to Acting


    This course develops effective presence on stage and in life through classroom exercises in movement, voice work, collaboration, imagination, character creation, and scene work from plays.  Learning experiences include small group and individual presentations, play reading and writing about plays, and attendance at a live theatrical event.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DRAM 130 - Stage Production


    This course involves the practice of scenic and lighting design for theater, including hands-on participation in the production of a play.  Learning experiences include play reading and introductory work in design concepts and methods, with most of the class hours organized around actual set construction and lighting work, as well as with the backstage running of a live theater production.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DRAM 150 - Making Theater in Communities


    Creative drama is a non-competitive group experience based on theatre games, exercises, and improvisational techniques that enable the teacher and students to explore together their five senses, imaginative powers, self-concept, interpersonal relationships, and view of the world. Students learn theatrical techniques and methods of guiding and nurturing groups in classroom or rehearsal settings as teachers or directors. Classes include group work in storytelling and readings in theory and practice of creative dramatics.

    Credits: 3








  
  • DRAM 215 - Directing Workshop


    This is a combined theoretical and practical course in the art of directing for the 
    theatre.  Emphasis is placed on developing individual creative expression and 
    interpretation of dramatic literature, exposure to the evolution of the role of the
    director, and exploration and practice in the preparation and rehearsal of scenes and 
    productions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Previous experience in the theatre and/or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3








  
  • DRAM 220 - Scene Study


    This course offers in-depth experience in the analysis and performance styles of scenes from the Shakespearean theater, the realistic theater, and the avant-garde theater. Progress is monitored via the instructor and peer evaluations, short papers, a log, and a final live production.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DRAM 110 - Introduction to Acting  

    or

    equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
  • DRAM 284 - Theater Performance Practicum


    Students gain accelerated development of their training as actors and intensive opportunity to demonstrate individual and collaborative skills through performance participation in major and supporting roles in the theater program’s public productions. Students enroll in this course after the required participation, submitting written materials to identify, assess and confirm their learning. May be taken more than once, to a maximum of 10 credits toward graduation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor and participation in SC Theater production in major or supporting role.



    Credits: 1-10









Early Childhood Education

  
  • ECED 210 - Early Childhood Development


    The course will focus on the developmental impact of children 0-6 years of age. Discussion will be focused on the historical perspective of child development for infant, toddler and pre-school children and its impact on indicators such as physical, emotional, and cognitive development. Emphasis will be on its relationship to the field of human services, the delivery of services and the development of professional providers. The course is the pre-requisite for all courses in the early childhood development concentration.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 250 - Infants and Toddlers: Learning through Relationships


    This course provides the development and education of infants and toddlers, it will emphasize relationships is the basis for learning and growth during this critical stage. The course will emphasize the important role of families and communities and infant toddler development. The course will emphasize the diverse social contexts in which early care and education for infants and toddlers exists. Additionally, the course will explore the socioeconomic and political issues and challenges family and caregivers face related to quality, accessibility to, and affordability of high-quality care and education programming for infants and toddlers.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 251 - Special Topics


    This course provides an opportunity for students to do an in-depth analysis on specific human services topics. The analysis will include looking at the issues from historical and cultural perspectives. The issues reviewed are developed by the instructor in collaboration with the class.

    Credits: 1-3








  
  • ECED 310 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education


    This course provides an overview of the foundations of early childhood education, while focusing on fostering professional development, reflective teaching and learning, and the best practices for children and their families. The course will also emphasize the integration of decision-making and teaching. This learning process will serve as a foundation for a lifelong journey for effectively working with young children, for infant, toddler and pre-school children and creating developmentally appropriate educational and care programs.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 320 - Children with Special Needs


    This course reflects the many changes in professional thought and practice in developing and providing services to children with special needs, especially in early childhood serving infant, toddler and pre-school children. The course will focus on recent legislation, reform movements in general and special education such as No Child Left Behind, techniques for ongoing classroom assessment (curriculum-based measurement), and collaborative parent-professional.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 325 - Ethical and Professional Standards for Early Childhood Educators


    This course explores ethics in early childhood education based on the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Code of Ethical Conduct. Participants will examine the beliefs that will provide a foundation for the development of a professional approach to ethics, as well as expand the knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding ethical behavior and decisions. Emphasis will be placed on leadership development within the field of early childhood education, especially for infants, toddlers and pre-school children.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 330 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 1


    Group Project 1 providesthe opportunity fordirect involvement in a community-based action research project. Working in small groups, students develop group protocols and responsibilities. In partnership with members of the community, student groups work on understanding the strengths, challenges, and possibilities of the community while designing possible strategies to address community-identified issue(s). Student groups are responsible for submitting a formal research proposal for the work to be continued in Group Project 2 and 3.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
  • ECED 331 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 2


    Group Project 2 focuses on implementation of the project by the students working collaboratively with the community-based organizations and individuals. Group responsibilities include data collection, preliminary analysis of data, and mobilization of available community networks, resources, and stakeholders toward actively addressing a community-identified issue(s). Groups are responsible for submitting an updated research paper for the work to be continued in Project 3.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
  • ECED 332 - Group Project in Community Development and Change 3


    The third course in the Group Project sequence focuses on evaluation, documentation, and oral presentation of the group project. The course requires students to produce a written final report that assess the impact of the group project on the participants and the community. There is a formal group presentation of project findings to faculty and community partner(s).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permalink



    Credits: 4








  
  • ECED 340 - Diversity and Multicultural Perspectives in Early Childhood Education


    This course examines the cultural and ethnic differences in values and its implications for instruction and curriculum development in early childhood education programs. Inaddition, this course explores how diversity in learning and development in young children should embrace individual differences. Tolerance, respect, bias, and prejudice will be explored as developmental concepts within young children. The role of the early childhood professional and community to promote multiculturalism and cultural competency will be discussed.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 350 - Early Childhood Health, Safety and Nutrition


    To ensure that the early childhood educator understands and appreciates the developmental needs of young children in the preparation of a safe, culturally component environment, lesson plans based on best practices, and holistic learning experiences in the areas of health, safety and nutrition. Major emphasis will be given to positive, evidence-based health, safety, and nutrition practices that contribute to the wellness of children, from birth to age six. Special emphasis will be given to learning environments which promote cultural competence and partnerships with families. The importance of recognizing symptoms and reporting procedures for child abuse will be emphasized.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 391 - Independent Study I


    Responding to changing currents in the field of human services, this course explores a topic of contemporary relevance. The course provides an introduction to the fundamental issues presented by the course topic.

    Credits: 1-3








  
  • ECED 410 - Early Childhood Education Classroom Management


    This course provides the early childhood teacher with strategies to identify and respond to challenging behaviors in the classroom serving infant, toddlers, and pre-school age children. It will focus on the elements within the classroom that help to create healthy environments conducive to learning and growing such as putting important focus on health, nutrition and safety. Emphasis will be placed on conditions that promote appreciation for multiculturalism, respect for students with special needs, identification of individual, family, school and community risk and protective factors, developmentally appropriate discipline, and strategies for parental and community involvement.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 420 - Basic Management Skills for Early Childhood Education


    This course provides participants a knowledge base that will assist with the increasing complexity of the administrative demands in early childhood education services. Participants will learn skills that will assist with managing care and education centers for young children. Also, participants will be able to understand the nature of political and social changes affecting the provision of services.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 450 - Assessment and Documentation in Early Childhood Education


    In this course, participants will develop knowledge and skills necessary for selecting, using, interpreting and evaluating measurements, screening
    instruments and providing documentation for techniques utilized and employed by professionals when assessing children (0-6 years of age). Participants will develop effective techniques for communicating assessment results to parents/guardians and other appropriate agency staff.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 460 - Program Evaluation on Early Childhood Education


    This course reviews policy making in education and human services organizations and/or communities. Critiques surrounding administrative procedures planning, operations and social policies are important aspects of the course. The design of this course provides participants with hands on analysis of education and human service policies and procedures as it relates to evaluating early childhood educational centers. Early childhood education is a prerequisite for the course.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECED 486 - Early Childhood Education Internship


    Internship provides participants with the opportunity to work in a real world setting, such as serving infants, toddlers, and pre-school children, where they are able to transfer theory into practice. The internship or field placement is the equivalent of 500 hours of supervised activities in a preschool or daycare setting. Participants’ involvement during the 500 hours includes, observation with minimal participation, observation with participation, and the final experience is as a sole student teacher in the classroom setting.

    Credits: 3-12









Economics

  
  • ECON 200 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    This is an introductory course designed to familiarize the student with basic macroeconomic analysis as it affects individual decision-making units-firms, consumers, etc. Among the topics covered are the concepts of macroeconomic theory, national income, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, unemployment, and economic growth.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 205 - Principles of Microeconomics


    This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with basic microeconomic analysis as it affects individual decision-making units-firms, consumers, etc. Among the topics covered are the market system, the pricing mechanism, industry market structures, and the distribution of income via the factors of production.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 301 - Managerial Economics


    This course will enable the student to examine the company’s profitability by applying economic analysis to a wide variety of business problems. It focuses on the application of economic tools to real situations. This course will enhance the students understanding of how markets operate and develop student capability in making economic predictions. Specific real-world applications and case studies will be used to support class analysis.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 - Principles of Macroeconomics  

    and

    ECON 205 - Principles of Microeconomics  



    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 302 - Economics of Decision Making II


    This course examines the application of economic principles within the realm of managerial decision-making. Special attention is paid to the market for economic resources, practical pricing decisions, regulatory influences on business activity, and the organizational structure of the firm. Emphasis is on current issues, including special considerations posed in choosing policy alternatives and responding to contemporary economic problems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 301 - Managerial Economics  



    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 310 - Money and Banking


    This course discusses the nature and function of money, credit, and monetary standards, and the role of the banking system in the economy. Topics include commercial banking, financial intermediaries, monetary theory and policy, the role of the Federal Reserve in stabilization policy, and international monetary economics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 - Principles of Macroeconomics  

    and

    ECON 205 - Principles of Microeconomics  



    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 315 - Business and Government


    This course examines the way in which businesses interact with government and society. The course explores how businesses must develop political/nonmarket strategies to work effectively with governmental bodies and society (and societal institutions). In addition, business, government, and society interaction in international markets studied. Case studies are commonly used in the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 - Principles of Macroeconomics  

    and

    ECON 205 - Principles of Microeconomics  



    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 320 - Economics of Healthcare


    The economics of the healthcare industry are reviewed with reference to the provision, distribution, supply, demand, and consumption of healthcare services. This course focuses on the relevance of economic analytic techniques and their application to processes of health resource allocation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 - Principles of Macroeconomics  

    or

    ECON 205 - Principles of Microeconomics  



    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 350 - Economics of Sports


    This course provides an overview of sport league economic models in order to consider public policy questions concerning sports. Selected topics from the extensive literature on the economics of sports are used e.g., franchise values, pay-for-performance, urban financing of stadiums, antitrust laws, and the profit motive in sport leagues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 - Principles of Macroeconomics  

    and

    ECON 205 - Principles of Microeconomics  



    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 365 - International Economics


    International Economics is concerned with the effects upon economic activity ofinternational differences in resources,consumer choices, and the institutions thataffect them. It seeks to explain thepatterns and consequences between theinhabitants of different countries, including trade, investment and migration issues. This course incorporates both international trade and international finance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 - Principles of Macroeconomics 



    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 600 - Economic Aspects of Healthcare Organizations


    This course introduces students to basic concepts of macroeconomics and microeconomics and examines the economic aspects of health services in terms of production, distribution, and institutional structure. Topics covered include: conditions affecting the demand for and the supply of medical care, delivery mechanisms, human resource management, the role of government regulation, and proposals to restructure the health care system in response to changing economic conditions.

    Credits: 3








  
  • ECON 601 - Economics of the Firm in Contemporary Society


    In this course, microeconomic theory isapplied to the analysis of the business firm. Principals from economics and business aredeveloped and integrated, with emphasis onmanagement decision-making and policyformation. Economic tools important foroptimal decision-making and effectivecorporate/business management are studied. Key teaching points involve the explorationof the rationale for the economic tools andtheir roles in market power, demand forecasting, and risk management, among other critical management decisions.

    Credits: 3









Education

  
  • EDUC 101 - Schools, Society, and Diverse Learners


    In this introductory course, students will explore the field of U.S. education from the diversity of learners, including exceptional and English-language learners, to the historical and philosophical foundations of education, in the study and practice of teaching. Students will be introduced to culturally responsive pedagogy, classroom management techniques, the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Students will practice writing measurable learning objectives as part of lesson planning, and discussed professional practice of the teaching profession.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 162 - Exceptional Children


    This introductory course offered for teachers of students with special needs in inclusion settings.  The characteristics and problems of children with disabilities and the differences in their learning styles and behaviors in the classroom are examined. The course provides a general overview of federal and state requirements in regard to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 504.  For education majors only, observational fieldwork in a variety of special education settings is required: education majors should take EDUC 238 with EDUC 162.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 210 - Children’s Literature


    This course familiarizes students with a variety of classical and contemporary prose and poetry and its ability to enrich children’s lives by meeting their needs for beauty, fantasy, knowledge, and emotional support. Students draw on the power of story for making connections between learning and discovery. Writing activities for extending literature across the curriculum are included in each class session.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 225 - Development of Mathematical Concepts in Young Children


    This course furthers the students’ understanding of mathematical concepts, with emphasis on the development of these concepts as they apply to young children. Current cognitive learning theory and instructional strategies for curriculum planning, implementation, and assessment in the early childhood classroom are examined, analyzed, and practiced. Developmentally appropriate curriculum and teaching methods/materials are emphasized. This course includes a 45 hour pre-practicum. The overall goal is for students to develop a theoretical framework that will inform their instructional decisions. The pre- practicum field experience allows students to integrate theory and practice in an Early Childhood placement.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 232 - Teaching Elementary Mathematics through the MA Curriculum Frameworks


    Through this course students learn to develop objectives, methods, and materials for the teaching of standards-based mathematics in grades one to six.  The course integrates constructivist theory, cooperative learning and thematic teaching.  Students design and implement developmentally appropriate learning experiences and authentic assessment tools utilizing differentiated instruction methodology to address the needs and abilities of a variety of learners.  Topics of study support the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, MA state teacher test, and the NCTM standards and goals.  This course includes a 45 hour pre-practicum.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 234 - Curriculum, Methods, and Organization for Secondary Teachers


    In this course, students learn lesson plan development, methods of instruction, and curriculum organization for middle school and high school teaching. Questioning techniques, alternative teaching-learning strategies, classroom innovation, the use of technology and audiovisual media, and the organization of time and teaching material are included. Individualization of teaching is stressed.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 237 - Foundations of Multicultural Education


    This course introduces students to Multicultural Education theory and practice with a special emphasis on content integration, cross-cultural competencies, and the structural (political, economic, social) and psychological dimensions of oppression.  The course will enable prospective teachers to see the interconnectedness of multiple forms of oppression (race, class, gender, sexual orientation, ability, religion, culture and language) and their impact on access to an equitable quality public education in the United States.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 238 - Pre-Practicum in Special Education (PreK-8)


    This pre-practicum is designed to initiatesecond or third year students into theteaching field through college supervised fieldwork in special education settings. Students spend forty-five hours in a classroom under the guidance of an experienced classroom teacher. Duringthe pre-practicum, students observe andrecord children’s behavior including children with disabilities, assist individuals,conduct small group lessons and prepare atleast two model lessons.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Taken concurrently with EDUC 162 - Exceptional Children 



    Credits: 1








  
  • EDUC 250 - Childhood and Adolescent Development in Educational Settings


    This course develops a fundamental understanding of the cognitive, affective, and physical growth of children and adolescents and the implications of these for curriculum planning. It includes a field experience in which students work closely with children and adolescents in neighborhood schools. Students will mentor these children and adolescents in specific areas of need, apply theories learned in class, and reflect upon the application of theory on practice.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 271 - Learning, Teaching, and Technology


    This course integrates technology with meaningful learning and teaching. The goal of this course is to demonstrate how technology helps to fulfill the new vision for learning and teaching described by state and national frameworks. The emphasis is on designing and implementing projects through technology that offer students the opportunity to construct new knowledge, develop collaboration skills, apply knowledge to new situations, and integrate subjects across the curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CISC 105 - Introduction to Computer Concepts  

    or

    equivalent.



    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 318 - Tutorial Pre-Practicum


    This course gives secondary students their first field work experience. They visit schools, observe teaching, teach classes, and arrange for tutorial work in their content area with pupils who require special help. Students develop and utilize teaching objectives, procedures, and tests to evaluate the achievement of objectives. Students meet regularly with College faculty to discuss their progress toward accomplishing their objectives.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 327 - Methods of Teaching Reading and Language Arts in Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms


    Reading, writing, listening and speaking are integrated through a balanced approach to teaching reading and language arts. Through coursework and classroom teaching, students analyze reading theory, research and practice. Topics include first and second language acquisition, emergent literacy, phonemic awareness, phonics, organizing literacy instruction, assessment and evaluation.  Course requirements include 60 hours of supervised prepracticum experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    A passing score on at least one subtest of the MTEL Communication and Literacy test.



    Credits: 4.5








  
  • EDUC 328 - Sheltered English Immersion


    Today’s classrooms include ever-changing student populations with diverse languages and cultures in which the fund of knowledge to draw from in our teaching. This course is designed to address the national and state requirements that all teachers emphasize academic language and provide means for sheltering content in classrooms. Emphasis will be on the principles, theories and processes of second language acquisition, culturally responsive practice, and research-based strategies of instruction. English-language acquisition, the value of technology, and the use of assessments will be dressed throughout the course.

    Credits: 3








  
  
  • EDUC 330 - PrePracticum in Literacy Instruction for PreK-8


    Students spend a minimum of 60 clock hours in inclusive and/or substantially separate pre-K-8 classrooms that service learners who are linguistically diverse and/or have identified learning differences. During the prepracticum, students observe and record learners behaviors, assist individuals, conduct small group and all class lessons under the guidance of the supervising teacher.

    Credits: 1.5








  
  • EDUC 342 - Curriculum and Assessment in Special Education


    This course introduces participants to the process of informal and formal assessment of students with disabilities. Purpose is for assessment and assessment selection decision-making processes are discussed. Students examine how to use assessment data to develop appropriate programming for students with disabilities, as well as how to develop goals and objectives that have the greatest impact for the student. Theories, concepts and methods of assessing academic and nonacademic domains are discussed. Assistive technology assessment, collaboration with related service providers, and services provided by other agencies are examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDUC 162 - Exceptional Children  



    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 362 - Instructional Strategies to Support Exceptional Learners


    This course introduces the evidence-based interventions and strategies that best support exceptional learners and accessing and making progress in the general education curriculum. This course addresses the design or modification of curriculum, instructional materials, and classroom environments for students with moderate disabilities. Emphasis is placed on differentiated instruction and developmentally appropriate strategies to support students with moderate disabilities in an inclusive environment. Includes field-based assignments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDUC 162 - Exceptional Children  

    and

    EDUC 342 - Curriculum and Assessment in Special Education  



    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 364 - Pre-Practicum-Teaching and Special Issues in Secondary Education


    This pre-practicum provides experience in high school teaching while concurrently dealing with a range of common problems occurring in secondary schools. Issues such as students’ and teachers’ rights, racism, sexism, equality, and special needs of individuals are considered. The course emphasizes integration of theory with practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure and have passed the MTEL Communication and Literacy test.



    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 461 - Moderate Disabilities (Pre K-8) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach students with mild to moderate disabilities (grades PreK-8) under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours, depending on the number of registered credits. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as a Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) teacher.  A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 4-12








  
  • EDUC 464 - Middle School Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach middle school students under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours, depending on the number of registered credits. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as a teacher at the middle school level.  A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 4-12








  
  • EDUC 465 - High School Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach high school students under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours, depending on the number of registered credits. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as a teacher at the high school level.  A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.



    Credits: 4-12








  
  • EDUC 466 - Early Childhood (PreK-K) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach students at the Early Childhood, grades PreK-K level under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.   Teacher candidates complete a minimum of 100 clock hours at the preschool level.  (Either EDUC 466 or 467 must be in a setting that includes children with special needs.) A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTELs.



    Credits: 6








  
  • EDUC 467 - Early Childhood (Gr.1-2) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach students at the Early Childhood, grades 1-2 level under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The candidate is under the guidance of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  Teacher candidates complete a minimum of 200 clock hours at the grade 1-2 level.  (Either EDUC 466 or 467 must be in a setting that includes children with special needs.) A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 6








  
  • EDUC 468 - Elementary (1-6) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach students at the elementary level (grades 1-6) under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor.  The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours, depending on the number of registered credits.  A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as an Elementary (1-6) teacher. A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 4-12








  
  • EDUC 528 - Sheltered English Immersion


    Today’s classrooms include ever-changing student populations with diverse languages and cultures in which the fund of knowledge to draw from in our teaching. This course is designed to address the national and state requirements that all teachers emphasize academic language and provide means for sheltering content in classrooms. Emphasis will be on the principles, theories and processes of second language acquisition, culturally responsive practice, and research-based strategies of instruction. English-language acquisition, the value of technology, and the use of assessments will be dressed throughout the course.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 555 - Early Childhood Curriculum and Care


    Students examine the research for making thoughtful and informed decisions about early childhood education and care. Topics of study include: the importance of play; developing appropriate social/emotional, cognitive/language, and physical environments; working with infants, toddlers, preschoolers and primary-aged children; and the importance of working with families of young children. Students evaluate the impact of parenting roles and responsibilities on strengthening the well being of individuals and families.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 609 - Literature with Children


    This course explores the characteristics of different genres in children’s literature. Students compare and contrast similar myths and narratives from different cultures and geographic regions. Students identify, analyze and apply knowledge of structure, elements, and themes of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry in children’s literature.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 619 - Contemporary Issues in Education


    This seminar addresses contemporary issues in education including, but not restricted to, education policy, academic standards, social justice, multicultural education, special education, curriculum, and schools in a changing society. Readings of contemporary writings in education, interaction with guest speakers, and viewing of videos which cover current educational issues form the basis of classroom discussion. This course encourages critical thinking, the formulation of clear arguments, and active listening skills.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 620 - Higher Education Law


    This course is an exploration of the legal issues that affect the administration of postsecondary institutions. The major focus is on issues pertaining to the various constituents (students, faculty, administrators) of colleges and universities. Legal cases are analyzed from the perspectives of law, education, and public policy. While the course is open to any graduate student, it is designed primarily for those who will be faculty or administrators in higher education.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 626 - Education Research Project


    This course builds on the research foundation established in Research 610, and specifically addresses educational research, including various qualitative methodologies (e.g., case study, observation, interviews, ethnography), with a focus on applied research methodology practical for educational settings (K-12 classrooms and schools, adult education, professional development, and other educational settings). Interpretation of research and its impact on professional practiceare also studied. Students will design, conduct, analyze and present a research project.

    Prerequisites & Notes




    Credits: 3-Feb








  
  • EDUC 627 - Teaching and Assessing Literacy across the Content Areas


    Reading, writing, listening and speaking are integral to a balanced approach to teaching literacy across the content areas. Through readings, online assignments, and applications to classroom teaching, students will analyze reading theory, research and practice. Topics will include first and second language acquisition, differentiated instruction for a variety of learning styles and abilities, components of a balanced literacy program, strategies for integrating literacy instruction across the content areas, and assessment and evaluation, including the IEP process.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 628 - Sheltered English Immersion Instruction Across the Curriculum


    The purposes of the course are to convey(1) the world of ELLs and their teachers,(2) the impact of Second Language Acquisition(SLA) in the classroom, and (3) teaching academic language and sheltering content across the curriculum. Strategies will be modeled, practice, and evaluated for use in classrooms from early childhood, elementary, middle school, to secondary level teaching. The course includes a pre-practicum component which students work in SEI educational settings to practice strategies introduced in class.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 635 - Engaging Families and Communities in Education


    This course addresses the development of culturally relevant practices for engaging families and communities in education. The course will include research on forms of engagement and effective communication strategies, means for supporting the homeschool connection, and approaches to building community partnerships. This hybrid course will integrate the use of online assignments, readings, and videos, as well as in-class discussions.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 637 - Foundations of Multicultural Education


    This course introduces students to Multicultural Education and Social Justice theory and practice with a special emphasis on content integration, cross-cultural competencies, and the structural (political, economic, social) and psychological dimensions of oppression and their impact on teaching and learning, critical pedagogy, and the transformation of curriculum.  Students will become familiar with Bilingual and English as a Second Language (ESL) Education and learn strategies to work with linguistically diverse learners.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 640 - Behavior Management for School Aged Children


    This course presents methods and theory on behavior management issues in today’s classrooms and the risk factors that influence anti-social behavior. Participants learn how to develop a multi-modal approach to behavior management that includes de-escalation techniques, classroom design and management strategies, cognitive restructuring, social skills instruction, community and family involvement, establishing routines, limits and anchor points, and crisis intervention. An emphasis is placed on applied research and practical application. Field study is required.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 642 - Assessment Interpretation and Planning in Education


    Theories, concepts, and methods of assessing physical, emotional, behavioral, academic, intellectual, and social development are discussed, with a specific focus on interpretation of results and data. The course also explores the process of developing and monitoring IEP goals and objectives/benchmarks. Assessing student needs related to assistive technology, current trends and assessment, information regarding collaboration with related service providers, and services provided by other agencies are discussed.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 645 - Autism Spectrum Disorders: Theory to Practice


    This course is designed to provide working education professional with insights into the application of evidence-based practices to support learners with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Based on an understanding of theories of cognition related to ASD, professionals will learn the evidence-based practices that best support students with ASD and will receive guidance in implementing those strategies in a variety of educational settings.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 652 - Elementary Curriculum Development and Implementation


    This course, taken concurrently with a pre-practicum, presents students with an integrated approach to the teaching of social studies, science, and mathematics for the elementary school classroom. The course emphasizes the application of the MA Curriculum Frameworks and national standards. Current cognitive learning theory and instructional strategies are emphasized in the planning, instruction, and assessment of curriculum.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 655 - Higher Education in America


    This course provides an examination of the landmark historical events in the development of higher education in America and the implications thereof. Some description of circumstances in differing types of institutions is developed. Some limited treatment of legal, financial, and social complexities which have evolved in recent years is given.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 658 - Exceptional Learners: Context, Characteristics, and Legal Considerations


    This course provides an overview of the foundations of special education. State and federal legislation that regulates special education services provide a framework for exploring the development of appropriate educational programming for learners with exceptionality’s. Characteristics of learners with exceptionality’s and related evidence-based practices are discussed. Course content includes an examination of universal design for learning, assistive technology, transition planning, and collaboration in the context of special education.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 662 - Moderate Disabilities Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach students with mild to moderate disabilities (grades PreK-8 or 5-12) under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor. The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as a Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8 or 5-12) teacher. A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTELs.



    Credits: 3-6








  
  • EDUC 663 - Middle School Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach middle school students under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor. The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as a teacher at the middle school level. A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for Practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 3-6








  
  • EDUC 664 - High School Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach high school students under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor. The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as a teacher at the high school level. A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for Practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 3-6








  
  • EDUC 667 - Early Childhood (PreK-K) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach students at the Early Childhood, grades PreK-K level under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor. Teacher candidates complete a minimum of 100 clock hours at the preschool level. (Either EDUC 667 or 669 must be in a setting that includes children with special needs.) A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for Practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 1-3








  
  • EDUC 668 - Elementary (1-6) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach students at the elementary level (grades 1-6) under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor. The experience includes between 150-450 clock hours. A minimum of 300 clock hours is required for those seeking licensure as an Elementary (1-6) teacher. A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for Practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 3-6








  
  • EDUC 669 - Early Childhood (1-2) Practicum and Seminar


    This culminating experience gives teacher candidates the opportunity to plan, organize, and teach students at the Early Childhood, grade 1-2 level under the direct supervision of a qualified supervising practitioner and program supervisor. Teacher candidates complete a minimum of 200 clock hours at the grade 1-2 level. (Either EDUC 667 or 669 must be in a setting that includes children with special needs.) A seminar taught by Springfield College faculty is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All standards for Practicum placement must be met including passing all required MTEL’s.



    Credits: 1-3








  
  • EDUC 671 - Learning, Teaching, and Technology


    This course integrates technology with meaningful learning and teaching. The goal of this course is to demonstrate how technology helps to fulfill the new vision for learning and teaching described by state and national frameworks. The emphasis is on designing and implementing projects through technology that offer students the opportunity to construct new knowledge, develop collaboration skills, apply knowledge to new situations, and integrate subjects across the curriculum. Students will be expected to researchtechnology tools in practice and report onthem.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 673 - Teaching Exceptional Learners: Advanced Practices and Methods


    This course prepares teachers to use evidence-based practices to support students with moderate disabilities and achieving meaningful access to the general education curriculum. This discussion includes environmental considerations, assistive technology, transition planning, and differentiated instructional planning to meet the needs of learners. Emphasis is placed on embedding elements of the IEP (course of accommodations) and universally designed lessons and teaching academic, social, and behavioral skills to diverse learners.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 685 - Secondary Methods, Assessment and Pre-Practicum


    This course deepens students’ understanding of teaching and learning at the secondary level. The theoretical emphasis of the class focuses on learning and learning style theories. The practical emphasis focuses on when and how to implement specific teaching and assessment strategies to support the academic development of all students. The course includes a 45 hr. Pre-practicum.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 686 - Mathematics Curriculum Development and Implementation for Secondary Education


    The theoretical emphasis of this course focuses on current cognitive learning theory and differentiated instructional strategies for use in curriculum planning and assessment in a secondary mathematics classroom. The practical emphasis focuses on when and how to implement the strategies to support the academic development of all students. The course is grounded in the principles outlined in The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 690 - Role of the Principal/Assistant Principal


    This course identifies those skills that are essential to effective principals and assistant principals. Among the topics and skill competencies to be examined are school organization, curricular needs, program and staff development, strategies for institutional change, fiscal management and budget concerns, and leadership styles.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 693 - Leadership in a Diverse Society


    This course, with tomorrow’s leaders in mind, examines appropriate and current leadership skills which will create effective organizations and builds a knowledge base of the multi-diversified groups and subgroups with whom an administrator (i.e. principal, assistant principal, supervisor, or curriculum specialist) must interact. Participants demonstrate the requisite skills that are necessary for effective leadership with diverse populations through the study of social justice issues in society.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EDUC 699 - Special Topics


    Special Topics

    Credits: 3









Emergency Medical Services Management

  
  • EMSM 114 - CPR, Health Care Provider


    The CPR course prepares the student to mitigate those situations resulting in foreign-body airway obstruction and sudden cardiac arrest in adults, infants, and children. The training includes manual, mechanical, and electronic techniques. Successful completion results in certification from the American Heart Association.

    Credits: 0.5








  
  • EMSM 115 - Emergency Medical Technician-Part I


    EMT Part I is the first semester of a two semester course to prepare the student forEMT Part II and ultimately for state andnational EMT certification. The courseincludes an introduction to Emergency Medical Services, patient assessment, patient airway management, and treatment of medicalemergencies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 114 - CPR, Health Care Provider 

    or

    AHA BLS Healthcare Provider certification.



    Credits: 4








  
  • EMSM 116 - Emergency Medical Technician - Part II


    EMT Part II is the second semester of a two semester courses to prepare the student for state and national EMT certification.The course includes trauma management, OB/GYNmanagement, pediatrics, and EMS ambulance operations and a clinical and fieldexperience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 115 - Emergency Medical Technician-Part I 



    Credits: 4








  
  • EMSM 135 - EMS Career Planning


    Lectures and discussions provide an overview of EMS systems, areas of specialization, legislative processes, and regulatory processes and problem solving. Students are required to study the issues in EMS and respond to them employing critical thinking.

    Credits: 3








  
  • EMSM 150 - EMT-Intermediate


    This course includes detailed patient assessment, advanced treatment of shock, pre-hospital intravenous therapy, endotracheal intubation and other advanced airway control measures.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 115 - Emergency Medical Technician-Part I 

    or

    permission of the medical director.



    Credits: 4








  
  • EMSM 160 - EMT-Intermediate Clinical Affiliation


    This is a clinical practicum consisting of one half-semester of performing invasive procedures in local hospitals under the direct supervision of physicians, nurses, and technicians. Areas of affiliation include the emergency department, intravenous therapy team, respiratory therapy department, and the operating room. Students are required to document the successful completion of the following skills endotracheal intubations, intravenous insertions, and patient assessments. Documentation of clinical case studies is also required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CORI

    3.0 average in EMSM 150 - EMT-Intermediate 

    or

    permission of the medical director.



    Credits: 1.5








  
  • EMSM 186 - Intermediate Field Internship


    This course consists of one half-semester of pre-hospital care internship performing invasive procedures under the supervision of certified preceptors.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 160 - EMT-Intermediate Clinical Affiliation 



    Credits: 1.5








  
  • EMSM 200 - EMT-Paramedic I


    This course begins the paramedic program and includes instruction in the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic, legal aspects of EMS, stress management, rescue and hazardous materials training, medical terminology, patient assessment, advanced airway management, pathophysiology and treatment of shock, burn trauma therapy, and pre-hospital pharmacology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 115 - Emergency Medical Technician-Part I 

    and

    permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 4








  
  • EMSM 201 - Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support


    This course provides a philosophic overview to prehospital trauma care, stressing the need to identify and consider the multisystem trauma patient as a unique entity with specific needs. The course also provides the prehospital provider with a specific body of knowledge related to the assessment and care of the trauma patient. Successful completion of the course results in certification at the provider level.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 200 - EMT-Paramedic I 



    Credits: 1








  
  • EMSM 211 - Basic Cardiac Life Support Instructor


    The BCLS instructor course provides the student with the core training in skills and methodology to teach cardiac life support under the auspices of the American Heart Association. The course includes discussion of the methodologies of teaching in various cultural settings, and a teaching practicum with an experienced AHA-BCLS Instructor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 114 - CPR, Health Care Provider 



    Credits: 2








  
  • EMSM 225 - EMT-Paramedic II


    This course completes the didactic portion of the paramedic program. It includes recognition and treatment of endocrine emergencies, central nervous system disorders, the acute abdomen, anaphylaxis, alcoholism, environmental and behavioral emergencies, pediatric emergencies, and an all-program review.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 200 - EMT-Paramedic I 



    Credits: 4








  
  • EMSM 249 - EMT-Paramedic III


    This course completes the didactic portion of the paramedic program. It includes recognition and treatment of endocrine emergencies, central nervous system disorders, the acute abdomen, anaphylaxis, alcoholism, environmental and behavioral emergencies, pediatric emergencies, and an all-program review.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 225 - EMT-Paramedic II 



    Credits: 4








 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 17