Jun 15, 2024  
2017-2018 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Chemistry

  
  • CHEM 123 - General Chemistry I Laboratory


    This is a laboratory course designed to illustrate the principles and applications of General Chemistry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students registered for CHEM 121 - General Chemistry I  must register for CHEM 123 or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 1







  
  • CHEM 124 - General Chemistry II Laboratory


    This is a laboratory course designed to illustrate the principles and applications of General Chemistry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: Students must register for CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II  or have permission of Instructor.



    Credits: 1







  
  
  
  • CHEM 222 - Organic Chemistry II


    Part II of CHEM 221. This is an introduction to the chemistry of carbon compounds, emphasizing the theoretical concepts of structure and mechanisms and the reactions of fundamental functional groups.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHEM 221 - Organic Chemistry I  

    Co-requisite: Students must also register for CHEM 224 - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CHEM 223 - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory


    The laboratory assignments in this course integrate the attainment of skill in standard laboratory techniques with extensive use of modern instrumentation such as IR, UV, NMR, and VPC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students registered for CHEM 221 - Organic Chemistry I  must register for CHEM 223 or have permission of Instructor.



    Credits: 1







  
  • CHEM 224 - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory


    The laboratory assignments in this course integrate the attainment of skill in standard laboratory techniques with extensive use of modern instrumentation such as IR, UV, NMR, and VPC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students registered for CHEM 222 - Organic Chemistry II  must register for CHEM 224 or permission of Instructor.



    Credits: 1







  
  
  
  
  • CHEM 342 - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory


    This lab course provides experience in the methods and techniques of quantitative analysis covered in CHEM 341.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHEM 341 - Analytical Chemistry  or concurrently

    or

    permission of Instructor.



    Credits: 2







  
  
  
  • CHEM 486 - Chemistry Internship


    The internship provides real-world experience in the various fields of chemistry, such as analytical, organic, inorganic, instrumental and/or environmental chemistry. Specialized laboratory procedures and/or instrumentation found in the respective area of chemistry in a professional setting are explored. Scientific research may be included in the laboratory experience. In addition to obtaining labotatory skills students gain professional workplace experience. Academic credit is awarded based on the number of hours sent at the internship site.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHEM, BIOL and SBIO majors only.



    Credits: 1-3








Communication Disorders

  
  • CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders


    This course presents a survey of the processes of communication sciences and disorders of children and adults, including fluency, voice, aphasia, articulation and
    language disorders.  Students are introduced to various aspects of the professions of 
    speech-language pathology and audiology and the types of clients served by their practice.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 239 - Understanding Deafness and Hearing Loss


    This course familiarizes the student with multiple aspects involved in the diagnosis, remediation, and acceptance of hearing loss. The course clearly differentiates the issues of hearing impaired from those of the deaf. Age of onset, familial history, enculturation, as well as specific scientific and academic issues are addressed in this course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 259 - Clinical Phonetics


    This course is used to familiarize the student with the anatomy and physiology of vowels and consonants of the English language. Students learn broad transcription of spoken language and how to recognize dialectal variance as well as variance arising from a variety of medically disabling conditions. Students are introduced to manner and place theory of articulation and are presented with laboratory experiences in which they are given transcription tapes to analyze.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 273 - Introduction to Linguistics


    This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the field of linguistics, an understanding of what language is, how it is structured, and how it works.  Students will increase their metalinguistic skills and learn to observe, analyze and reflect on their own linguistic behavior and the behavior of those around them.  Class format will include lecture, discussion, and problem solving.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 353 - Anatomy and Physiology of Speech/Hearing Mechanisms


    This course is designed to study specific structures of the head and neck regions and their interrelation to respiration, phonation, articulation, and sound reception. The student examines the intricate processes involved in the physical aspects of the human communication process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 355 - Introduction to Audiology


    This is an introduction to the profession of audiology. The education and training requirements to become an audiologist are presented. Theories of hearing, clinical testing instrumentation, and assistive devices are explored in detail. Students administer basic hearing tests and explore audiogram interpretation. Off-site observations are required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 363 - Speech and Hearing Science


    This course provides students in the Communication Disorders concentration with a broad overview of the field of linguistics. The student gains an understanding of what language is, how it is structured, and how it works.  Students increase their metalinguistic skills and learn to reflect on their own linguistic behavior and the behavior of those around them.  Students observe and analyze linguistic behavior. Class format includes lecture, discussion and problem solving.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 368 - Articulation and Phonological Disorders


    This course familiarizes students with the speech articulation process involved in the production of standard American English, the intricacies of connecting sounds to produce meaningful speech, as well as causes and outcomes of disorders of phonology. The student learns to evaluate phonologic disorders and plan the remediation thereof.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders  

    and

    CMDS 259 - Clinical Phonetics  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 456 - Language Acquisition and Development


    This course provides an overview of the normal language acquisition and development process throughout the life span, with particular emphasis on birth through school age. The interrelationships among linguistic, neurophysical, cognitive, social, and cultural factors as they affect language acquisition are discussed. The student becomes familiar with various theories of language acquisition, the rule systems of the English language, stages of language development, and techniques for collecting and analyzing a language sample.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders  

    and

    CMDS 273 - Introduction to Linguistics  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 457 - Clinical Procedures for Communication Disorders


    This course is an introduction to the professions of speech/language pathology and audiology. Management issues related to the clinical process, as well as ethical practices, are introduced and developed. The course topics include: the referral process, the clinical interview, therapy procedures, counseling concurrent with clinical service, and report writing and formats.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 462 - Aural Rehabilitation


    This course introduces students to the habilitation and rehabilitation of adults and
    children who are deaf or hard of hearing.  Assessment and therapy procedures related to auditory training, speechreading, assistive technology, speech/language/communication facilitation,, hearing aid training, and cochlear implant therapy are taught. Educational management, counseling strategies and consultation models are presented.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 101 - Introduction to Communication Disorders   

    and

    CMDS 355 - Introduction to Audiology  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CMDS 483 - Language Disorders in Children


    Topics include etiology, diagnosis, evaluation, cultural differences, and treatment of children with language disorders.  Clinical case material is discussed and analyzed.  Introduction to diagnostic tools and evaluations/methodology.  Basic theoretical constructs pertaining to the treatment of the language-impaired populations from birth through high school.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMDS 456 - Language Acquisition and Development  



    Credits: 3







  

Communications/Sports Journalism

  
  • COMM 120 - Introduction to Journalism


    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of writing the news story, covering events, interviewing, and gathering information from a variety of sources. The emphasis is on writing for newspapers.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 130 - Broadcast Writing


    This course serves as a partner course with COMM 120, the Introduction to Journalism course, to teach COSJ majors both styles of writing in the communications field.  It is a precursor to the Radio and Television Journalism courses taken later.  The instructor teaches the techniques used in both radio and television script writing.  The students also utilize a computer software program entitled Final Draft in the 
    construction of the different scripts.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 134 - Introduction to Communication


    In this course, students examine key communication concepts and examine how they function in group, organizational, social/public, cultural, and mass communication contexts. Some of the concepts students study via reading, writing, discussion, and experiential assignments include communication theory, perception, language, verbal and nonverbal messages, channels, and relationships.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 207 - Desktop Writing and Publishing


    This course teaches students to write and design documents in a desktop publishing environment. Students learn how to create and design a variety of communications using a common desktop publishing program. Particular type, graphics used in creating desktop publishing materials, and the emerging convention of electronic writing are covered. Particular attention is paid to principles of document design and the effective use of fonts, type, and graphics.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 208 - Newspaper Design and Production


    In this course, students are introduced to the fundamental theories of layout, grid 
    systems, typography, color, and use of photography for newspapers.  Students develop editorial and design skills through study and execution of various newspaper design problems.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 211 - Sports Information


    This course examines the basic fundamentals needed to implement a program in sports information, publicity, and promotions on the college level. Preparation of news releases; local features; hometown features; publication of programs and brochures; statistical breakdowns; dealing with local, regional, and national press; and the promotion of specific events, teams, and individuals are included.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 212 - Sports Writing


    This course introduces the student to the practice, ethics, history, and business of writing sports for newspapers. Students write the kinds of stories that appear in daily American sports sections, read and analyze samples of the best sports journalism, and study the historical development of the sports section in American newspapers.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 219 - TV/Digital Journalism


    This course examines the methods and techniques of television broadcasting.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 224 - Advanced Journalism


    This course requires the student to function as a professional print-medium reporter. The student generates weekly story ideas and/or is assigned a story by the editorial staff of the Springfield Student and the instructor. The student researches, interviews sources, and writes the story to meet the newspaper’s deadline. Students write a minimum of ten full-length stories per semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COMM 120 - Introduction to Journalism  



    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 225 - Internet Journalism


    The purpose of this class is to provide a broader education in the journalism/professional media field, and to offer students a better understanding of mass communication in society, through the field of internet journalism.  A relatively new disciple and one that is evolving before our eyes, internet journalism adds a true multimedia approach to the skills of traditional journalism.  Students will create multimedia packages of their own, incorporating the written word with photos, audio and video files.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 229 - Radio / Audio Journalism


    This is the introductory course to radio broadcast journalism.  Students learn the different aspects of creating audio segments to be aired on a radio station.  The class utilizes the proper equipment found in the industry and eventually produces a newscast for WSCB-FM, the school radio station.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 230 - Video Editing


    In this course, students are introduced to advanced non-linear video editing techniques.  Students focus on the amount of work and varied skills needed to produce professional level videos.  Besides the final editing, students create the project ideas, write the scripts, lay out both video and audio storyboards, and record the video and audio.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COMM 219 - TV/Digital Journalism  



    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 245 - Web and Multimedia Design


    This course prepares students to present information and stories on the Internet.  Students develop a practical understanding of this journalistic genre, and experiment with innovative writing styles and storytelling techniques that take advantage of the multimedia presentation capabilities of the Internet.  Students learn a basic knowledge of the software and other tools utilized in the production of news for the Internet.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 252 - Sports Broadcasting


    This course introduces students to the field of sports journalism on radio and television. Students utilize the equipment from each area to produce both in the field and in the studio production assignments.  Many different aspects of sports broadcasting are covered, including interview techniques, highlight package construction and sports talk shows.                                  

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 260 - The Press in America


    This course traces the development and role of mass media in America, focusing particularly on the role of a free press in a democracy. Print, electronic, and film media are studied.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 288 - Special Topics in Journalism


    The material covered in this course varies from year to year. It includes topics geared to provide a broader education in the journalism/professional media field and to offer students a better understanding of mass communication in society. Topics offered include, but are not limited to, media ethics and law, media history, mass communication theory, and women, minorities, and mass media.

    May fulfill General Education category literature if a student completes a waiver application.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 301 - Media, Sport and Culture


    This course analyzes the role of the worldwide sports media in reflecting and shaping the culture of sport.  Examining both historical and contemporary sources, students study the impact of racism, sexism, politics, and economics on the production of sports media texts.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 310 - Media Law and Ethics


    This course investigates the legal framework that the U.S. mass media business operates under in relation to the controls that the government has enacted.  Students examine the different areas of law and legal precedence.  This involves court cases, both nationally and regionally, governmental offices and decrees, and self-controls performed by the different forms of the media.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 319 - Advanced Television Production


    Students write, shoot, edit, and produce bi-weekly news programs for campus television station SCTV3.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 320 - Television and Society


    This course involves an examination of the U.S. television industry, the programs that are broadcast daily over the airwaves and the impact said programs have on U.S. society and culture.  Starting from the early days of the 1950’s, the course scrutinizes several different genres of shows that have appeared on American television and how these productions have altered and shaped the lives of their viewers.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 325 - Journalistic Ethics


    This course provides students with as understanding of the ethical dilemmas faced 
    by journalists. Topics include: fairness and accuracy, conflicts of interest, the right to
    privacy, the use of confidential sources, the use of deception to uncover truth, the role of public figures, the responsible coverage of tragedy, source/reported relationships, and the conflict between getting it first and getting it right.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 350 - Advanced Radio Production and Broadcast Management


    This course involves a two-part study program.  First, students examine the different levels of broadcast management and economics of the various companies, conglomerates and small businesses that exist in the industry.  Secondly, students complete a multifaceted and rigorous training in radio/audio production/reporting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    COMM 219 - TV/Digital Journalism  

    or

    COMM 229 - Radio / Audio Journalism  



    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 384 - Practicum in Sports Journalism


    This practicum provides students with professional experience in sports broadcasting, sports writing, and sports information.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the Humanities Department Internship Coordinator.



    Credits: 2







  
  • COMM 386 - Journalism Internship


    This course provides an opportunity for students to work on an individual basis with a professor in the field of journalism. Students may be assigned to a newspaper or magazine office or to a radio station or television studio on a full-time basis for the equivalent of one term. Only six semester hours of graduate credit can be accumulated.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the Humanities Department Internship Coordinator.



    Credits: 3-12







  
  • COMM 388 - Special Topics in Journalism


    Varies by semester.

    Credits: 3







  
  • COMM 482 - Seminar in Mass Communications


    Selected topics in American and international mass communications are assigned. The subject of the seminar may vary from year to year.

    Credits: 3








Computer and Information Sciences

  
  • CISC 103 - Studio in Computer Graphics


    This is an introductory course that focuses on the technology of computer graphics. Each student has the opportunity to explore a number of graphic software programs, utilizing several computer systems. With the software programs employed, students are able to draw, paint, design, and create web pages of almost unlimited possibilities. No previous computer experience is necessary. A strong sense of design and drawing ability are keys for success in this course. Cross-listed with ARTS 103.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 105 - Introduction to Computer Concepts


    This course emphasizes computer literacy and competency and provides a foundation for more specialized areas of computer science. The development of computer hardware is studied to gain an understanding of what a computer is and how it functions. Computer skills are developed through practical experiences with widely used operating systems, word processing, spreadsheet, and database software.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 115 - Microcomputer Applications


    This course covers microcomputer applications software within an integrated development environment designed for office productivity.  Emphasis is placed upon the design of spreadsheets, graphs, databases, and professional reports and presentations.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 120 - Introduction to Programming using Mobile Technology


    This course is an introduction to the exciting world of developing apps for mobile and tablet devices.  Course content is designed for those who have some or limited programming experience that want to gain knowledge and skills to develop mobile solutions in this growing technology segment.  Students will create applications for a mobile computing device platform and testing will be done using a software emulator.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 165 - Programming in BASIC


    In this course, students learn how to construct, edit, and execute programs written in BASIC. Emphasis is placed on language syntax, logic, and structure.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CISC 105 - Introduction to Computer Concepts  

    or

    permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 175 - Introduction to Computer Science with C++ and Java


    This course is designed to provide a basis for the technical aspects of computer science. The course begins with a study of the functional units and components of a computer system and proceeds to use basic mathematical skills to reduce problems to a form appropriate for solution on the computer. Emphasis is placed on a study of the various aspects of structured programming and the problem-solving process, including problem specification, organization, and maintenance with the use of the programming languages C++ and Java.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CISC 105 - Introduction to Computer Concepts  

    or

    permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 202 - Computer Animation


    This course provides the student with an in-depth study of the creation of computer animation. Each student has the opportunity to develop animated pieces from initial conception to final animation, and then developing it for the web. Students use a variety of two-dimensional software and develop skills in story boarding and interactivity.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 235 - Computer Logic Design


    This course gives an essential knowledge of modern computers at the level of logic circuitry design. Topics include arithmetic of various number systems, mathematical logic, Boolean algebra, gate networks, flip-flops, and logic designs in various components of the digital computer together with their functions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CISC 175 - Introduction to Computer Science with C++ and Java  

    or

    permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 255 - Data Communications and Distributed Processing


    This course involves the study of basic features of centralized, decentralized, and distributed computer systems. Selected case studies emphasize the impact of distributed systems on the business enterprise. Technological implications of computer hardware, software, and communications as they relate to the design, development, and implementation of distributed data processing systems are also examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CISC 235 - Computer Logic Design  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 275 - Data Structures Using C++


    This course deals with the study of the representations, manipulations, implementations, and applications of data structures such as arrays, records, sets, files, stacks, queues, linear and linked lists, trees, and graphs through techniques such as sorting, pointers, and hashing. Use of the computer is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CISC 175 - Introduction to Computer Science with C++ and Java  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 280 - Object-Oriented Programming with Java


    This course deals with a study of object-oriented programming principles using the programming language, Java. Both Java applications and applets are designed. Specific topics include Java primitive data types, Java control structures, methods, event-driven programming, designing graphical user interfaces, graphics and sound, threading and multithreading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Previous programming experience is required, preferably in C or C++.

    CISC 175 - Introduction to Computer Science with C++ and Java  is preferred 

    or

    permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 315 - Database Development and Management


    This course introduces the student to the basic principles of applications program development in a database environment. Special emphasis is placed on loading, modifying, and querying the database using a host language. Also discussed are various storage devices, data administration, and database management.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 316 - Advanced Database Development and Management


    This course deals with a study of advanced concepts of database development using standardized structured query language (SQL) for relational database management systems. Specific topics include developing skills in using ORACLE SQL PLUS which extends the capabilities of the standard SQL language for database development and management, and learning fundamental skills in building database applications using ORACLE PL/SQL programming language.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Previous programming experience is required.

    CISC 315 - Database Development and Management  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 320 - Systems Analysis and Software Design


    This course introduces students to the financial, technical, and strategic aspects of computer information systems analysis and design. Emphasis is on the relationship between computer information systems planning processes and overall business goals, policies, plans, management style, and the industry condition. Particular emphasis is placed on the discussion of the means of selecting large systems projects; assessing the installation’s current state; determining processing, staffing, software, hardware, and financing needs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CISC 115 - Microcomputer Applications  

    and

    CISC 215 - COBOL and File Processing  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 335 - Literacy, Hypermedia, and Modern Communication


    Students in this course explore the relationship of technology and communication, focusing on hypertext and hypermedia’s power to redefine literacy in the classroom and in the workplace. Students work toward a definition of literacy’s historical evolution from oral to pictoral and graphic to print, focusing on the noetic demands and impact of that evolution. With hands-on use of the technology, the course investigates the shift from paper-bound to electronic literacy particularly as embodied in hypertext and hypermedia.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 375 - Computer Architecture


    This course deals with a detailed study of those concepts that are essential in the design of a computer architecture. Topics covered include hardware algorithms for computer arithmetic, computer systems organization, memory organization, addressing techniques, memory allocation and protection, cache and virtual memories, input/output structures, channels, and interfaces.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 410 - Fundamentals of Operating Systems


    This course studies the organization of computer software systems, principles of operating systems, batch, multiprogramming, multiprocessing and time-sharing systems, addressing techniques, storage management, file systems design, and user-related services.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 420 - Software Engineering for Game Programming


    This course is a capstone course that applies basic principles of software engineering to the programming of non-violent computer games. Major topics include Windows programming, DirectX programming, Open GL, object-oriented software engineering, software design patterns, animation programming, physics modeling, sprites, collision detection, basic artificial intelligence, and development of game engines.  Competency in C++ and Java programming is required.  Other contemporary languages such as Python, Ruby, and Lua are introduced.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 482 - Computer Systems Seminar


    This course is designed to address various current technical and managerial problems encountered in computer information systems, including those dealing with hardware architecture, systems software, and applications software.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • CISC 486 - Field Experience in Computer Information Systems-Management


    This course provides students with the opportunity to apply academic skills, mastered in the study of computer information systems-management, within the scope of an industrial environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Departmental approval.



    Credits: 3








Criminal Justice

  
  • CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    This course introduces the student to the American system of criminal justice.  Its
    growth and development is examined with emphasis placed on three essential 
    components of the system: the police, courts and corrections.  Each component contributes to our understanding of the definition and measurement of crime, and various efforts to explain the causes of crime.  The following issues will be a primary focus of the course: discretion of law enforcement agents; due process; and the contemporary changes occurring within the context of the criminal justice system.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 205 - Corrections


    This course explores the historical development of correction systems.  The
    principles of correction operations, theories and methods of offender treatment 
    which may be employed within the boundaries of probation, parole, prison, capital 
    punishment and other correction alternatives are studied.  Local, state and federal correctional systems are reviewed as well as looking at the patterned behaviors of both custodial staff and inmates in the context of a controlled environment.  The concept, rationale and administration of the adult correctional  institutions will be the focal point in this introductory course.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 210 - American Court System


    This course examines the structure, organization and procedures of American courts with emphasis on the adversarial role existing between the prosecuting attorney and the defense attorney in the judicial setting.  Students also examine  the fundamental elements of both substantive and procedural law in relation to constitutional guarantees.  Historical and contemporary explanations of the American crime problem will also be analyzed in correlation with social, demographic and economic variables.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 220 - Law Enforcement


    This course focuses on the historical role of police officers and the growth and expansion of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. In contemporary America, police officers use discretion in making the following decisions (a few among many important decisions): whether to enforce a specific law, to investigate specific crimes, to stop and search, to arrest or detain an individual and whether to refer cases to the prosecuting attorney for filing of formal criminal charges. Special attention is given to the future of law enforcement in relation to terrorism and homeland security.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 230 - Deviant Behavior


    This course addresses how deviant categories are created and evolve with respect to institutional practices. There is a critical examination of theories and empirical studies of social deviance, particularly the formulation and application of deviant labels, organizations relating to deviance, and deviant behavioral patterns. The primary focus of the course is on criminal deviance.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 260 - Criminology


    A study of crime patterns, behaviors and institutional practices in addressing the crime problem is the major focus of this course.  This course examines the nature of crime in relation to the social, economic, and political processes in exploring the behaviors of individuals processed through the criminal justice system.  Structural, social, psychological and environmental approaches are frequently used in the direction of differentiating the criminal from the non-criminal.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 270 - Constitutional Law


    This course examines the historical concept of federalism.  Students compare federal and state judiciary and review the concept of stare decisis.  Most of the constitutional    
    guarantees afforded suspects will be reviewed, including but not limited to, the  
    right to confront witnesses, the privilege against self-incrimination, the right to be  
    free from illegal search and seizure, double jeopardy protection and the right to a speedy public trial.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 310 - Crime Scene Investigation


    This course discusses the practices and strategies used by law enforcement officers  
    in their daily operations.  Emphasis is placed on forensic science, as the 
    application of science to the enforcement of law, has become extremely important to policing in the twenty-first century.  Students also learn the coordination between 
    criminal justice agencies in addressing the crime problem.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 320 - Institutional Corrections


    This course provides students with an in-depth examination of the history, function, structure, and operation of American adult and juvenile correctional institutions.  Examines topics such as classification of offenders, prison overcrowding, prison violence, and privatization.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice  

    CRIM 205 - Corrections  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 325 - Juvenile Delinquency


    The causation, control, and prevention of delinquency and offenses of young adults are
    discussed. This course exposes students to the origins and development of the juvenile justice system from historical, legal and institutional perspectives.  Youth gangs are also discussed in an effort to understand the distinction existing between the concepts of youth gangs and violent youth gangs.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 330 - Criminal Law


    This course examines the origin and nature of criminal in relation to different substantive categories of crime that are defined by lawmakers.  The substantive  criminal law contains the basic doctrines stipulating the conditions that must be met before a person can be convicted of an offense.  Of primary importance are the various conditions that, if present, may relieve an individual of responsibility for committing a crime. Students will study the penal codes of both state and federal in their efforts to define categories of offenses.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 340 - Community-Based Corrections


    This course provides students with a comprehensive review of community-based sanctions, alternative student frustration, and early release processes. Students learn about the wide array of effective punishment and treatment programs designed to meet the level of risk and needs for different offenders.  It covers topics such as traditional probation and parole, as well as intermediate sanctions, including electronic monitoring, house arrest, boot camps, day reporting centers, restitution, fines, community service.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice  

    CRIM 205 - Corrections  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 350 - Drugs, Crime and Policy


    This course examines the historical development and the current state of the use of criminal sanctions to combat the use of illicit drugs. It also offers the policy analysis of traditional and alternative ways to deal with the drug/crime connection. Specifically, it examine supply-side interventions, demand reduction, legalization, decriminalization, and harm reduction strategies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice  

    CRIM 260 - Criminology  



    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 360 - Gender, Race, and Crime


    This course examines how gender, race, and class affect criminal laws and criminal justice policies and practices. Students consider the position of females and racial minorities from the perspectives of victims, offenders, and criminal justice practitioners. Topics include racial profiling, sentencing disparities, hate crime legislation, zero-tolerance policies, the war on drugs, and intimate partner violence.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRIM 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

    CRIM 260 Criminology 



    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 370 - Violence and Victimization


    This course identifies and analyzes individual and group violence and victimization from varied theoretical perspectives.  Emphasis is on the recent emergence of the study of victims; the types and circumstances of victimization; and the frequent violence that is generally associated with the crime.  The course also includes the causes and consequences of victimization, and the nature of the criminal justice system’s response to crime victims.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 380 - Offender Reentry and Reintegration


    This course provides students with an in-depth overview of the offender reentry and reintegration. It examines the reentry process, as well as barriers to successful reintegration of individuals transitioning from prison to society. Topics include employment, treatment, family reunification, and housing issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice  

    CRIM 205 - Corrections 



    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 388 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice


    This course explores current topic controversies arising within the field of criminal justice.  Topics and subject matter will vary from one semester to the next and reflects an in depth study of the particular issue being observed.

    Credits: 3







  
  • CRIM 486 - Supervised Internship in Criminal Justice


    This involves an individually contracted experiential learning under the supervision of professionals within criminal justice or related systems. It is intended to assist the students in exploring and confirming career goals, as well as to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the classroom. Students engage in 45 clock hours of supervised internship per semester hour of credit.

    Credits: 3-9







  
  • CRIM 494 - Criminal Justice Senior Seminar


    Criminal Justice Senior Seminar course provides students with an opportunity to reflect broadly upon their education in the Criminal Justice major and specific competencies they have acquired through their field and experiences.  The course emphasizes the vital connection between theory, research, policy and practice in the field of criminal justice.  For criminal justice majors only. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites: Graduating Senior in Criminal Justice w/a completion of at least 42 credit hours including Social Research and Evaluation (SOCI 492 - Social Research and Program Evaluation ) and all other required courses.



    Credits: 3








Dance

  
  • DANC 101 - Dance Appreciation


    This course explores dance from ancient to contemporary times through film and lecture. The objectives include broadening one’s understanding and appreciation of the dance arts and developing the ability to view dance critically.

    Credits: 3







  
  • DANC 102 - Introduction to Dance


    This experiential course provides an introduction to dance as a personal, social, artistic and communal activity. Employing multiple intelligences, Laban Movement Analysis, and choreographic process, class activities will include experiences in dance movement fundamentals, rhythms, various dance forms, improvisation, choreography, performance, critical thinking and dance criticism. Learning experiences will include reading and written assignments, journaling, critiquing, and dance research.

    Credits: 3







  
  • DANC 110 - Laban Movement Analysis


    This course combines movement experiences, lecture, readings, and discussion focused around concepts developed by Rudolf Laban, which include Effort, Space Harmony, Labanotation, and Bartenieff Fundamentals. The material has broad application in areas such as dance, movement, sport, fitness, education, therapy, research, and anthropology and is tailored to the needs of the individuals in the course.

    Credits: 3







  
  • DANC 130 - Ballet Theory and Technique I


    This course provides an intensive experience in classical ballet. The primary emphasis is on learning classical ballet technique. The secondary emphasis is on appreciation of the history and aesthetics of ballet. Learning experience includes technique class two times per week, dance viewing and criticism, related readings, and discussions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PEAC 127 - Dance-Ballet l  



    Credits: 3







  
  • DANC 135 - Modern and Post-Modern Dance Theory and Technique I


    This course provides an intensive experience in American modern and post-modern dance. Drawing from the numerous styles and philosophies associated with the development of American modern and post-modern dance, this course emphasizes the individual at the center of the dance experience. Classes include dance technique, improvisation, performance, readings, discussion, and video.

    Credits: 3







  
  • DANC 150 - Jazz Dance Theory and Technique I


    Designed for the beginning dancer, this course provides an intensive experience in various styles of American jazz dance. It traces the origins of jazz dance from African, European, and American dance forms. Learning experiences include technique class two times a week plus some dance viewing, reading, lecture, and discussion.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Some dance experience or permission of the instructor.



    Credits: 3







  
  • DANC 151 - Jazz Dance Theory and Technique II


    This course provides an intensive experience in jazz dance technique and performance.  Drawing from numerous styles, the course emphasizes individual development in the techniques of jazz dance, swing, and African-American vernacular dance forms.  Learning experiences include technique classes twice per week, improvisation, choreography and performance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 150 - Jazz Dance Theory and Technique I  



    Credits: 1







  
  • DANC 161 - Modern and Post Modern Dance Theory and Technique II


    This course provides an intensive experience in the study of modern dance and post-modern dance.  Drawing from numerous styles, the course emphasizes individual development in various techniques and performance.  Learning experiences include technique classes twice per week, improvisation, contact improvisation, choreography, performance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 135 - Modern and Post-Modern Dance Theory and Technique I  



    Credits: 1







 

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