Apr 18, 2021  
2007-2008 School of Human Services Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2007-2008 School of Human Services Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]


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School of Human Services Program Requirements



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Major Course Requirements


In the undergraduate program, students complete a basic sequence of three required core courses that provide participants with a common frame of reference and opportunities to critically analyze and creatively construct ideas about the nature and function of society including aspects of history, education, politics, economics, philosophy, justice, community and leadership for social change. Students must also successfully complete a required yearlong community research project that allows them to work together in study groups for the purpose of designing, implementing and evaluating a community change project. Through a culminating senior seminar requirement, students are expected to demonstrate that they can integrate and apply the theories, skills and concepts learned in the classroom to their practice in work, family and community settings.

Course Prerequisites Policy


Students must successfully complete courses within a sequence and/or specified prerequisite courses to enroll in the next level of courses. Incomplete or “F” or “*” grades denote that a course has not been successfully completed.

General Education Requirements (42 credits)


The General Education program at Springfield College is informed by its century-old Humanics tradition of educating the whole person in spirit, mind, and body, for leadership in service to humanity. These requirements have the goal of developing literate, thoughtful, socially responsible students, and instilling in them a spirit of inquiry into the nature of humankind and the universe. Towards those ends, the requirements emphasize and encourage: the acquisition of knowledge, understanding, and competency essential for the improvement of the human condition in a diverse society; a search for personal and spiritual values; and the development of an understanding and appreciation of physical well-being.  Recognizing that our students will specialize in a variety of specific majors, the General Education requirements ensure that all students will achieve a common set of learning objectives as part of their Springfield College experience. These common objectives embody the college’s definition of an educated person and ensure that our graduates will be able to demonstrate the skills, knowledge, and understanding needed to achieve the mission of the college to educate students for leadership and lifelong service to humanity. The common learning outcomes for all baccalaureate graduates include:

  • The ability to provide leadership in service to humanity;
  • The ability to communicate effectively in both written and oral form;
  • The ability to think critically within and across disciplines, to interpret information, and to develop well-reasoned conclusions;
  • The ability to provide leadership in service to humanity;
  • The ability to communicate effectively in both written and oral form;
  • The ability to think critically within and across disciplines, to interpret information, and to develop well-reasoned conclusions;
  • The ability to read critically, interpretatively, and empathetically;
  • The ability to reason quantitatively and to use mathematical and technological tools for problem solving and analysis;
  • An understanding and appreciation of aesthetic, imaginative and creative expression;
  • An understanding and appreciation of the scientific process of discovery, critical thinking, and analysis;
  • An understanding and appreciation of the social sciences and historical perspective in comprehending the modern world;
  • The ability to reflect critically on personal, spiritual, and cultural values in order to live an effective and fulfilling life;
  • An understanding and appreciation of the importance of personal wellness and lifelong physical activity in the enrichment of human life;
  • An understanding and appreciation of the opportunities and challenges inherent in a world that is increasingly diverse, multicultural, and international.

    The following curricular requirements have been established in support of these outcomes. However, none can be fully achieved solely by taking a given course. Therefore, these outcomes will be reinforced across the General Education curriculum and within program majors and minors.

Part I - Competencies


College Writing

Computer Applications

Part II - Domains of Knowledge / Understanding


Art & Humanities: 9 credits total (3 credits from each category)


Literary Studies

Visual / Performing Arts

Spiritual & Ethical Dimensions

Analytical & Natural Sciences: 6 credits total (3 credits from each category)


Quantitative Reasoning

Natural Sciences

Natural Sciences: 3 credits


Social Sciences: 6 credits total (3 credits from each category)


Historical / Cultural Studies

Behavioral and Social Sciences

Historical / Cultural Studies: 3 credits


International / Multicultural Studies: 6 credits total (3 credits from each category)


International

Multicultural

Physical Education: 6 credits total (3 credits from each category)


Health & Wellness

Physical Activity

Core Curriculum


The School’s Core curriculum provides a common frame of reference, information, experience and analysis. It is the heart of a learner’s program of study. The diversity of courses reflects a respect for learning that both fosters the integration of theory and practice and promotes the responsibilities of global citizenship. The courses that make up the Core curriculum are listed and described below:

Required of students in the Addiction Studies Concentration


(in place of HUSB 330, 331, 332)

Required of students in the Community Youth Development and Leadership Concentration


(in place of HUSB 330, 331, 332)

Required of students in the Criminal Justice Concentration


(in place of HUSB 330, 331, 332)

Required of students in the Early Childhood Education Concentration


(in place of HUSB 330, 331, 332)

Concentrations


Several concentrations are available to students in the School of  Human Services. In some cases, courses required for a concentration may extend the time required to complete the course of study. Students must consult with the campus where they are enrolled to determine the availability and requirements of particular concentrations.

In the case of specific concentrations in the bachelor’s degree program, students may be required to complete more than 120 semester hours to meet general education, core, and concentration requirements.

Addiction Studies Curriculum Concentration


Concentration Mission: The mission of the Addiction Studies Concentration is to prepare practitioners for professional service by providing access to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that underlie evidence-based practices and to promote professional readiness and cross-cultural competence in order to meet the needs of diverse individuals, groups, and communities affected by addictions.

Policy Statement


  • Students wishing to obtain the Addiction Studies Concentration through the School of Human Services must take all four required/core courses of the concentration in residency at the School.  The other 12 credits of electives may be taken in residency, may be transferred in from other higher education institutions, or may be awarded through the prior learning process.  In addition, students are required to complete their Group Project in Community Change in the field of addictions.

Required Core Courses (12 credits)


Electives: 12 credits


Courses may be taken from one focus area or a combination of areas based on the student’s educational needs, prior experience, and professional goals.

Community Youth Development and Leadership Concentration Curriculum


Concentration Mission:  The mission of the Community Youth Development and Leadership Concentration is to provide a transformational learning experience within which youth workers explore alternative approaches to youth work and their implications for practice.  Youth workers develop knowledge, attributes, and skills necessary for creating opportunities for young people to develop into healthy, productive, and contributing members of their communities through maximizing their full leadership and civic potential.

Policy Statements:


  • Students wishing to obtain the Community Youth Development and Leadership Concentration must take all four required/core courses of the concentration in residency at the School.  The other twelve credits of electives may be taken in residency, may be transferred in from other higher education institutions, or may be awarded credit through the prior learning process.
  • Students enrolled in the Community Youth Development and Leadership Concentration must fulfill their requirements for Group Project in Community Development and Change (12 credits under the course numbers CYDL 330, 331, and 332) by completing a project that is youth related. 

Electives: 12 credits


Courses may be taken from one focus area or a combination of areas based on the student’s educational needs, prior experience, and professional goals.

Early Childhood Education Concentration


Concentration Mission: The mission of the Early Childhood Concentration (ages 0-6) is to educate students to serve as early childhood professionals who (1) create high quality, collaborative, comprehensive, consistent, culturally congruent learning environments for all children; and (2) support and validate parents and families, so that communities will be empowered to achieve social and economic justice.

Concentration Requirements:  Students must complete a minimum of 24 semester hours focused on early childhood course work. Students in the concentration must complete coursework in Ethics, Multicultural Education, Foundations of Early Childhood Education, Classroom Management, Assessment and Documentation, and Program Evaluation. Students must also successfully complete an early childhood field placement that will focus on developing core competencies as identified by the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

Area of Focus (12 credits)


Select either the Classroom Based or Administration Track.

Criminal Justice Concentration Curriculum


Concentration Mission: The mission of the Criminal Justice concentration is to empower the criminal justice practitioner to advocate  for meaningful change within the criminal justice system that will embrace a collaborative effort between the community and those charged with the administration of justice within that community.  The concentration will activate and articulate a construct of an emerging notion of social and economic justice.

Credit Policy: Students must take 24 total credits in the concentration.  Pre-Core Courses and Elective Courses will count for 12 credits.  Required Courses must be taken at the School of Human Services to be counted toward the fulfillment of the 24 credits required for the concentration.

Transfer Policy: Students can transfer up to 6 credits toward the concentration by approval of the Registrar’s Office.  Recommendation for 7-12 credits transferred toward the concentration must be recommended by the Criminal Justice Concentration Coordinator and approved by the Registrar’s Office.  Each case will be reviewed on its own merit.

Pre-Core Courses/Prerequisites: 9 credits


Note:  These courses are already required courses within the concentration.  If students do not have these courses upon enrolling, they must take them prior to taking the Core Courses.  If a student needs to take these credits at SHS, the courses will count toward the 12 credits needed for elective credits.

Electives: 3 credits


Courses may be taken from one focus area or a combination of areas based on the student’s educational needs, prior experience and professional goals. 

Education Concentration Curriculum


Vision and Purpose

 

With budget cuts to education nation-wide, increasing accountability directed to public schools to help students pass standardized tests for graduation, and teachers retiring in record numbers, there is clearly an increasing need for qualified, licensed elementary classroom teachers, especially in urban areas.  Studies show that teachers will be most effective if they come from the communities in which their schools are located and reflect the same demographics as the children in the school.  Adults with varied life experiences who are motivated, well prepared, and committed to quality education make up a huge pool of potential new teachers.  Candidates include paraprofessionals, career changers, parents returning to the workforce after raising children, school volunteers and people who work with children in any setting, not just school classrooms. 

 

This concentration enables adults to explore the field of education, focus on education as an avenue for change, gain a broad range of subject matter knowledge, and earn a bachelor’s degree while working full time.  The adult-centered program offers opportunities to explore ways to make education the way we want it to be.  The course work will help to prepare students to pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensing (MTEL) in Communication and Literacy and Elementary Subject Matter. 

Goals are to provide:

  • Access to the educational field for non-traditional adult learners,
  • Excellence in preparation to enter a licensing program after graduation,
  • Opportunities to expand and deepen students’ views of the diverse world. 

 

The education concentration alone does not qualify graduates for licensing. Students who are successful in the program and who pass the communication and literacy MTEL are eligible for post baccalaureate professional preparation programs.

 

Graduation Requirements

 

  • Students must earn 120 credits to graduate.  Of those credits, 48 must be taken at Springfield College (residency requirement).  
  • Students must complete all three levels of required courses: 

            1.  General Education Requirements

            2.  SHS Requirements

            3.  Education Concentration requirements

                 (Minimum 18 credits taken in residence)

                                                                                 

  • Group Project must focus on an educational issue. 

General Education Requirements - 28 credits


There are nine General Education requirements.  They can  be met by any General Education course, transferred or in residence.  Some General Education requirements can be met by required Education Concentration courses.

General Education Categories

  • Lab Science (3 credits)
  • Computer Science (3 credits)
  • Mathematics (3 credits)
  • Health (3 credits)
  • Language and Communication (6 credits)
  • Literature (3 credits)
  • Philosophy or Religion (3 credits)
  • Fitness (4 credits)

          Total - 28 credits

Education Concentration Requirements - 36 credits


Education Concentration students must take or transfer all of the following courses.  At least six of these courses (18 credits) must be taken at Springfield COllege, while the rest can be transferred.  Some can be used to meet General Education requirements as noted.

Elective credits - 24 credits


The additional 24 credits can be earned in any area.

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