Sep 24, 2022  
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Springfield College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Emergency Medical Services Management

  
  •  

    EMSM 251 - Advanced Cardiac Life Support


    This course prepares the student to mitigate those medical situations resulting in foreign body airway obstruction and sudden cardiac arrest in adults, infants, and children using manual, mechanical, pharmaceutical, and electronic therapies. Successful completion results in certification from the American Heart Association.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Completion of EMSM 200 - EMT-Paramedic I is strongly recommended.



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    EMSM 260 - Emergency Medical Technician Professional Enhancement


    This course is designed to provide a practice testing system for students who have completed a national standard curriculum EMT course and who wish to complete the National Registry of EMT’s cognitive certifying examination.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    EMSM 301 - Pediatric Advanced Life Support


    This course prepares the student to recognize and treat foreign body airway obstruction and sudden cardiac arrest in infants and children using manual, mechanical, and electronic therapies. Successful completion results in certification from the American Heart Association.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 249 - EMT-Paramedic III 



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    EMSM 302 - Pediatric Educ/Pre-Hosp Professional


    The Pediatric Education for PrehospitalProfessionals is designed to give prehospital professionals the education, skills, andconfidence they need to treatpediatric patients effectively at the highest prehospital level.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    EMSM 325 - System Status Management


    This course uses the United States Department of Transportation’s emergency dispatcher standard curriculum to provide the knowledge, skills, and tools to deal with the general public when rendering emergency assistance by telephone. The course also provides students with the mechanisms to direct appropriate resources to the scene of an illness or injury.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    EMSM 335 - Plan and Design of Emergency Vehicles and Facilities


    This course acquaints students with the process of planning and design of emergency medical services facilities and vehicles. A study of the managerial roles in this process is emphasized, as well as design technologies, safety, and maintenance. Select facilities and EMS vehicles are studied in detail.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    EMSM 340 - EMS Continuing Education and EMT-Basic Refresher


    This course provides the basic refresher and continuing education requirements for recertification as an EMT-Basic.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    EMSM 350 - EMT-Paramedic Clinical Affiliation


    In this course, students are required to document successful performance of invasive skills under the supervision and direction of licensed hospital personnel. Areas of affiliation include the emergency department, the intravenous therapy team, the operating room, labor and delivery, ICU/CCU, the psychiatric unit, and pediatrics.

    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    EMSM 354 - Paramedical Clinical Concepts


    This course is designed to provide the student with a functional understanding of the continuum ofcare from the patient’s arrival through urgent or emergency care and admission to or discharge from the hospital. Areas of study include the Emergency Department, Intensive and Cardiac Care Units, Pediatrics and Labor and Delivery.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 200 - EMT-Paramedic I 

    EMSM 225 - EMT-Paramedic II 

    EMSM 249 - EMT-Paramedic III 



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    EMSM 374 - Fundamentals of Search and Rescue


    FUNSAR is designed to prepare the student to participate in search and rescue as a member of a search team. The course covers topics such as visual human-tracking, survival, wilderness first aid, land navigation, search tactics, tactical aspects of the IncidentManagement System, and lost person behavior. Successful completion of the course results in certification from the National Association for Search and Rescue.

    Credits: 2








  
  •  

    EMSM 375 - Search and Rescue Management


    This course provides skills and materials that include decision-making practice in determining missing person detectability and survivability, and statistical and topographic analysis of lost person behavior. Successful completion results in certification from the National Association for Search and Rescue.

    Credits: 3








  
  
  •  

    EMSM 386 - EMT-Paramedic Field Internship


    Students are assigned to licensed advanced life support ambulance services and work under the direction of qualified paramedic preceptors. Procedures include field endotracheal intubation, intravenous therapy, intravenous drug administration, and advanced cardiac life support care.

    Credits: 4








  
  
  •  

    EMSM 420 - EMS Management Senior Project


    This guided individual study is to be completed in the final semester of the senior year. Topics must be pertinent to one or more areas of emergency medical services and are selected with the counsel of the course instructor.

    Credits: 3








  
  
  
  •  

    EMSM 486 - EMS Management Internship


    In this course, students complete supervised experience divided into two or more of the following EMS concentrations: operations management, systems implementation, regulation, legislation, and product research and development.

    Credits: 3









English

  
  •  

    ENGL 100 - Writing Studio


    Writing studios are small support groups that provide supplemental instruction and assistance to students who need extra help meeting the requirements of ENGL 113 and ENGL 114. Through self-assessment and writing samples, identified students enroll for one credit along with regular enrollment in ENGL 113 and ENGL 114. Grades are determined by attendance, participation, and completion of assigned work. This course can be repeated once, for a total of 2 credits.

    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    ENGL 113 - College Writing I


    This course provides instruction in the skills of written communication, including sentence structure, paragraph building, and the organization and development of expository essays. Students are introduced to strategies for critical reading, basic research methods, and documentation of sources. Computer-based writing is integral to the course.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II


    This course continues the work of College Writing I, but focuses on more complex expository and argumentative writing, critical textual analysis, and more sophisticated research strategies. Computer-based writing is integral to the course.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies


    This course is an introduction to the studyof literature. Students learn the essential tools of close reading and critical analysis of literature in its major genres: poetry,fiction, and drama. Students also becomefamiliar with a variety of interpretivetheories and methods in the study ofliterature, and apply several of thesemethods in their own literary analysis.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 209 - World Literature


    This course is a study and analysis of some of the greatest pieces of literature of the Western cultural heritage. Beginning with the literature of the Greeks (the epics, plays), it includes the literary genres of Italy, England, Germany, France, and America. At least eight to ten pieces of literature (including genres in addition to those above) are required reading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 211 - Latinx Literature


    This course will focus on non-fiction, fiction, poetry, and dramatic literature by people who draw on the traditions of Spanish-, French-, and Portuguese-language cultures of the Americas, including people with origins in the Caribbean and North, Central, and South America. Readings may explore topics such as the role of “Manifest Destiny” in the production of Latino/a/x literature, modernity, the rise of Latino/a/x consciousness in the 1960s, race, gender, indigeneity, language choice, and the relationship between literary form and politics. No knowledge of a language other than English is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies   



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 215 - Readings in Literature


    This course includes readings which evaluate a variety of classical and contemporary pieces organized around a major theme, issue, genre, or event. The literature may be selected from any one or more writers or periods of the Eastern or Western worlds.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II   

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
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    ENGL 216 - The Athlete in Literature


    This course undertakes an analysis of selected prose and poetry depicting the athlete as an individual and team member. Positive values and major issues of the sport experience are explored. Such writers as Virgil, Twain, Hemingway, Lardner, Schulberg, and others are studied for their themes and literary merit.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II   

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies   



    Credits: 3








  
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    ENGL 217 - Sports, Gambling and the Media


    This course explores gambling as a cultural phenomenon in the United States, focusing particularly on the role of mass media in three major sports gambling scandals: the 1919 Black Sox, boxer Primo Carnera, and point-shaving in college basketball.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
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    ENGL 218 - The Art of Telling a Love Story


    This course examines novels from varied literary traditions and analyzes how narrators arrange their fictional worlds, setting and place, and set in motion characters, dialogues, and descriptions to bring out multiple representations of relationship and love. In this course, students read translated novels of French authors: Balzac, Maupassant, Camus and Saint-Exupery. Critical thinking and writing under the overarching theme of love promotes an understanding of the novels in their cultural/historical contexts, which also leads to an appreciation of enduring human values.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  
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    ENGL 225 - American Drama


    This course is a study of selectedplaywrights representing the development ofAmerican drama from the late nineteenthcentury through the present. Attention willbe paid to various forms of theatricalrepresentation, including realism, melodrama, expressionism, and the avant-garde.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  
  •  

    ENGL 230 - Post-Colonial Literature


    Persons who have cultural ties to countries formerly ruled by colonial powers write post-colonial literature. This poetry, drama, and prose often describes how such persons are affected by both the legacy of colonialism, the systematic occupation and domination of one country by another, and decolonization, the process by which colonies become self-governing or independent. In addition, this literature often explores strategies former colonies have used to survive in a world dominated by global capitalism. This course examines post-colonial literature written in four regions of the world: Latin America and the Caribbean, Australia and Oceania, Asia, and Africa and the Middle East.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 231 - Tutoring in English


    This course gives student peer tutors some pointers on how to communicate grammar, syntax, and spelling rules to students for whom writing is difficult. The course also offers suggestions for helping students develop and organize content, follow directions for writing assignments, and deal with specific writing tasks, including the research paper.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the Writing Center Director.

     

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 1








  
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    ENGL 232 - Tutoring in English Practicum I


    This course is a practicum or internship as a peer tutor in the College Writing Center. Students tutor for a minimum of three contact hours per week throughout the semester. This course may be taken by Writing Center tutors with experience prior to the creation of ENGL 231.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the Writing Center Director.

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 1








  
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    ENGL 233 - Tutoring in English Practicum II


    This course is a practicum or internship as a peer tutor in the College Writing Center. Students tutor for a minimum of three contact hours per week throughout the semester. This course may be taken concurrently with ENGL 232.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the Writing Center Director.

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 1








  
  •  

    ENGL 235 - English Internship


    This is an opportunity for students to use English skills in a professional setting. The internship can involve working off-campus such as in the communications department of a company or in publishing, and/or serving as editor-in-chief of the Alden Street Review or working with other campus organizations. No more than three credits of ENGL 235 can count toward the basic 39 credits of English required for the major.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 1-6








  
  
  •  

    ENGL 241 - American Literature I


    This course focuses on a topic in American Literature prior to the Civil War (e.g., a literary movement, a focused historicalperiod, a group of authors, a genre, or a theme.)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated (up to a total of 9 credit hours) if topics vary.

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 242 - American Literature II


    This course focuses on a topic in American Literature in an era from the Civil War to the present (e.g., a literary movement, a focused historical period, a group ofauthors, a genre, or a theme.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated (up to a total of 9 credit hours) if topics vary.

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 245 - LGBTQ Literature


    This course examines literary works of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer communitiies. Students analyze novels, plays, poetry, film, essays, and/or graphic novels, and discuss the use of literature and other forms of artistic expression to explore LGBTQ experiences in relation to LGBTQ history, legal battles, identity struggles, activist and social justice movements, and other issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 246 - American Short Story


    This course examines the historical significance and the artistic achievement of classic works of American short fiction from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries alongside the work of new and emerging voices in contemporary U.S. literature. The course aims to help students become more effective readers and critical writers.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies   



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 251 - African American Literature I


    This course traces African American self-expression in autobiographical and imaginative forms from 1760 to the 1930’s, noting the educational, social, economic, political, and legal limitations within which, or against which, they were produced.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 252 - African American Literature II


    This course presents African American literature from the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920’s through the contemporary period, tying literary movements and text to music, visual art, folklore, history, and socio-political contexts from which they spring.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II   

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 261 - British Literature I


    This course focuses on a topic in earlyBritish literature from the beginnings to the Enlightenment (e.g., a literary movement, afocused historical period, a group ofauthors, a genre, or a theme).

     

    In selected semesters, as noted in the course offerings information, the course will focus on the literature of the Middle Ages and will include an optional trip over Spring Break to London and York, England, to visit medieval sites.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated (up to a total of 9 credits) if topics vary.

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 262 - British Literature II


    This course focuses on a topic in Britishliterature from the Romantic period to the present. Possible topics include the study of a literary movement, afocused historical period, a group ofauthors, a genre, or a theme.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated (up to a total of 9 credits) if topics vary.

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 270 - Nature and Environmental Writers


    This course is a literature course with atheme; it introduces the student to aselection of nature and environmentalwriters. The class examines nature writingas a unique form of writing. There are many themes to examine within this genre-how wehumans find our “place” in nature and whatthat means to us, how science relates toliterature and art, the complex relationship between wildness and civilization, as well as spiritual issues and environmental issues and responsibilities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  
  •  

    ENGL 274 - Asian American Literature


    This course examines novels, short stories,poetry, essays, and political texts written by Asian Americans. Students will attend to the form, content and context of the readings in order to develop their critical thinking skills in relation to a number of issues,themes, and concepts which emerge out of and in relation to Asian American literature and the American racial context; exclusion, group identity, community individualism, racial identity, and immigration.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 275 - Women and Literature


    In this course, students read literature written by women and study the literary tradition and critical reception of women writers. Particular emphasis is placed on the cultural position of women in the United States, emphasizing racial, ethnic, and class diversity.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 276 - Men in Literature


    This course studies the dialogic relationship between various men, embodying differentmasculinities and literature. The studyconsists of two components: first, anexploration of men’s literacy and literature and second, a service-learning project thataims to create a male-positive learningexperience of men’s literacy for service-providers and clients.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  
  •  

    ENGL 303 - Business and Professional Speaking


    Individuals learn rhetorical techniques for effective speaking in the workplace in the context of their respective future careers. Students are required to make several effective oral presentations, proposals, informative lectures or briefings, progress reports, summaries, evaluations, budget reviews, etc. Participation in mock interviews and staff meetings and proper use of visual aids and equipment to enhance presentations are stressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 305 - Writing for the Professions


    This course involves the practice and study of selected types of discourse employed inprofessional writing situations, preparingstudents for different systems of writing in their professional lives. Examples from the writing of workplace professionals areanalyzed and used as models to demonstratethe transition from academic to professional writing.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 306 - Reading and Writing Poetry


    This course is intended to develop students’ skills in the writing of poetry. Students are expected to submit several written assignments during the course of the term, to read and respond to the poetry of professional poets, to prepare detailed and close peer evaluations, and to submit a significant portfolio of writing at the end of the semester. This course will run primarily as a creative writing workshop.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 307 - Writing and Reading Fiction


    This course develops students’ skills in the writing and reading of fiction. Students submit several written assignments during the course of the term, read and respond to short stories and novels by published writers, prepare detailed and close peer evaluations, and submit a significant portfolio of writing at the end of the semester. This course is run primarily as a creative writing workshop.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 308 - Writing and Reading Creative Non-Fiction


    This course develops students’ skills in the writing and reading of creative non-fiction. Students submit several written assignments during the course of the term, read and respond to short stories and novels by published writers, prepare detailed and close peer evaluations, and submit a significant portfolio of writing at the end of the semester. This course is run primarily as a creative writing workshop.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  
  •  

    ENGL 330 - Early Modern English Literature


    This course focuses on a topic in the Early Modern Period (1485-1660) of English literature (e.g., a literary movement, author(s), a genre or form, or a theme).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated (up to a total of 9 credits) if topics vary.

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  
  
  •  

    ENGL 343 - Film as a Narrative Art


    Narrative films such as On the Waterfront, All the King’s Men, and Requiem for a Heavyweight are studied and discussed in terms of character, theme, structure, and style. Similarities between cinematic technique and the adaptation of material from literature to film are explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 349 - Modern American Poetry


    This course is a survey from Dickinson to such poets as Frost, Stevens, Wilbur, and Silko. Modern poetic forms, diction, and content are emphasized. The course reflects the diversity of modern American poetry and its relevance to contemporary literary movements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 350 - Modern American Novel


    This course explores ideas of modernism and post-modernism in American novels, considering ideas of moderism as both an era of literature and a style of writing.  What makes a piece of writing “modern” or “post-modern”?  How do we know?  Who decides?  We will discuss the idea of “the Great American Novel” and how marginalized writers are often excluded from consideration in that debate.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 352 - American Realism and Naturalism


    This course focuses on the literary genre, criticism, and cultural context of America from 1865 to 1914. The course includes a study of the works of the following writers: Howells, Whitman, Twain, James, Harte, Garland, London, Norris, and Crane.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 353 - American Romanticism


    This course focuses on the literary works of key nineteenth century authors in the American Romantic movement: Irving, Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman. Romantic themes of individualism, imagination, and intuition are stressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 356 - Readings in the English Novel I


    This course traces the rise and development of the English novel from the early eighteenth century until the mid-nineteenth century. Included in this examination are the evolution of narrative voice and structure, point of view, theme, and ideology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 357 - Readings in the English Novel II


    This course traces the development of the English novel from the mid-Victorian period through the middle of the twentieth century, focusing particularly on the modernist and postmodernist movements and their influence on narrative voice, point of view, structure, theme, and ideology. Authors included are Eliot, Gissing, Hardy, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Burgess, Sillitoe, and Golding.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 359 - The Contemporary Novel


    This course seeks to investigate the novel from the point where traditional courses in American and European literature terminate. Current novels are read and discussed in an effort to evaluate their literary merit, popularity, and contribution to modern culture.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 362 - Celtic Literature


    This course explores modern and contemporary Irish, Welsh, and Scottish literary traditions, with attention to the mythological and political backgrounds of the literature. Particular emphasis is given to the Irish Literary Renaissance and such writers as Yeats, J.M. Synge, James Joyce, Flann O’Brien, and Frank O’Conner.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 370 - Film Genre


    Each semester it is offered, this course focuses on a specific film genre such as     
    athlete in film, crime film, women in film, science fiction film, or film comedy.  Films 
    are analyzed in terms of character, theme, symbol, structure, and unique cinematic 
    techniques.  It is suggested, but not required, that students take ENGL 343, Film  
    as Narrative Art, prior to ENGL 370. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    This course may be repeated (up to a total of 9credit hours) if different genre topics areselected.

    ENGL 114 - College Writing II   

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  
  •  

    ENGL 388 - Special Topics in Narrative Film


    Each semester it is offered, this course focuses on a specific film genre such as the war film, film comedy, or the western. Films are analyzed in terms of character, theme symbol, structure, and unique cinematic techniques. It is suggested, but not required, that students take ENGL 343 Film as a Narrative Art, prior to 388. This course may be taken for credit more than one time if different genre topics are selected.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 114 - College Writing II  

    or

    ENGL 160 - Introduction to Literary Studies  



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 428 - Modern Drama


    This course explores modern trends in the development of dramatic literature, with emphasis on Realism and Theatricalism.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 467 - Shakespeare


    This course is an in-depth study of the works of William Shakespeare.  Students analyze selected tragedies, comedies, histories, romances and/or lyric poems in a variety of historical and cultural contexts, using different theoretical approaches.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 261 - British Literature I 

    or

    ENGL 262 - British Literature II 

    This course is geared for junior and seniorENGL and COSJ majors.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 482 - Seminar


    Selected topics in British or American literature are assigned. The subject of the seminar may vary from year to year.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or Senior English majors, American Studies majors, or English minors.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENGL 488 - Special Topics


    Varies.

    Credits: 3









English for Speakers of Other Languages

  
  •  

    ESOL 250 - ESOL Reading and Writing I-Advanced


    This is an advanced level reading a writing course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing reading and writing skills to enable them to function effectively in an academic setting. Students should be placed in ESOL 250 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Fall only) .

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ESOL 251 - ESOL Speaking and Listening-Advanced


    This is an advanced speaking and listening course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing the speaking and listening skills to enable them to function effectively in an academic setting. Students should be placed in ESOL 251 through the placement exam or with the recommendtion of an ESOL instructor. (Fall only)

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ESOL 260 - ESOL Reading and Writing II-Advanced


    This is an advanced level reading a writing course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing reading and writing skills to enable them to function effectively in an academic setting. Students should be placed in ESOL 260 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Spring only)

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ESOL 261 - ESOL Speaking and Listening-Advanced


    This is an advanced speaking and listening course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing the speaking and listening skills to enable them to function effectively in an academic setting. Students should be placed in ESOL 251 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Spring only)

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ESOL 288 - Special Topics


    Three special topics courses are offered each semester. Topics may include TOEFL preparation, study skills, vocabulary development, pronunciation, or advanced grammar topics.

    Credits: 1









Environmental Science

  
  •  

    ENVS 115 - Environmental Geology


    Environmental Geology is an introductory course examines broad range of topics, all relatedby theinteractions between geological processes and society. Class begins with an overview of our physical environment, covering such topics as: rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, weathering and erosion, and climate trends. The class continues by focusing on such topics as geologic hazards, utilization of natural resources, environmental management, and regulatory processes.

    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    ENVS 120 - Foundations of Sustainability


    Sustainability is an interdisciplinary field that examines the interrelated environmental, economic, social and technological problems facing humans at local, regional and global scales. This course takes a scientific approach to understanding sustainability: providing a foundation of the concepts, principles and tools from diverse fields that contribute to understanding and responding to problems such as climate change, environmental degradation, and social inequalities. Introducing perspectives from the natural and social sciences, arts and humanities, and professional disciplines, it explores how their interconnection increases the prospects for creating a more sustainable future.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENVS 150 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    This course provides an introduction to the theory and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This class includes the three components of GIS: data, analysis, and communication. Topics covered include data sources, data collection, data analysis techniques, and communication through cartography. The course balances theoretical and applied material, enabling students to apply knowledge of GIS in the solution of real-world problems.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    ENVS 240 - Hydrology


    Hydrology is the study of water on and below the surface of the Earth.  Hydrology studies the properties of water and movement of water through the Earth’s spheres and its relationship with the living and nonliving environment.  Topics include, but are not limited to: surface and groundwater hydrology; watershed dynamics; and ecosystem hydrology.  The study of Hydrology is fundamental to the study of the environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENVS 115 - Environmental Geology  

    MATH 115 - College Algebra  



    Credits: 4








  
  •  

    ENVS 486 - Environmental Science Internship


    The internship program is designed to help you connect your academic studies to practical applications by offering academic credit for environmentally-focused work experience. A well-designed internship will allow you to develop your professional skills, gain hands-on experience, evaluate career opportunities, and begin building a professional network. Academic credit is dependent upon the number of hours spent at the internship site.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENVS majors only



    Credits: 1-3









Finance

  
  •  

    FINC 486 - Finance Internship


    The internship highlights academic study with a focus in various areas of finance. It offers students the opportunity to test classroom theory, align career goals, develop a professional outlook, proof communication skills, and deepen the understanding of the functions of finance in a business setting. Academic credit is dependent upon the number of hours spent at the internship site. Courses for junior and senior business majors only.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPCO 220 - Internship Preparation Seminar  



    Credits: 1-6









French

  
  •  

    FREN 103 - Cultures of France and Francophone World


    This course presents selected aspects of French culture through readings, and especially through the viewing of films.  The aim is for students to visualize a culture before examining it. Students discuss selected topics pertinent to the French civilization that are also relevant to them. In addition, students acquaint themselves with French-speaking countries by embarking on an intellectual voyage through discussions of each movie and each literary work, through individual research, and oral presentation.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    FREN 111 - Elementary French I


    This course is offered to students with no experience of the French language. Students are immersed in all the complexity of spoken French and are brought to speak with confidence and good pronunciation in familiar situations. By means of this immersion method, students use their creativity and coping skills to communicate and to reflect on the differing values in a foreign culture.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    FREN 112 - Elementary French II


    This course is for students with some experience of the French language. As in French 111, students are immersed in French by means of global media. Conversation skills are stressed. Students use their creativity and coping skills to communicate. They also study selected aspects of French culture and develop awareness of the differing values in another culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FREN 111 - Elementary French I  

    or

    the successful completion of two years of French at the secondary school level.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    FREN 113 - Conversational French: Ecouter, Parler, Aimer


    This French conversation course is for students with some experience of the French language.  Students are immersed in French by means of global media; they hone their speaking skills and their accent in role playing.  As they use their creativity and and coping skills to communicate; students also learn selective aspects of French culture and develop awareness of the differing values in another culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FREN 111 - Elementary French I  

    or

    2+ years of French at the Secondary School level.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    FREN 211 - Intermediate French I


    This course focuses on the practical and contemporary aspects of the French language by means of technology and multimedia, thus reinforcing the socio-cultural frameworks of language. Conversation skills are emphasized while students surf the net, watch movies, read poetry, sing songs, prepare French recipes, and make phone calls.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FREN 112 - Elementary French II  

    or

    the successful completion of three years of French at the secondary school level.



    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    FREN 212 - Intermediate French II


    This course emphasizes the advantages of learning a foreign language as a means of communication and as the key to a different culture. Students gain a better understanding of how the French Language works in real life. The conversational method of the course stresses both verbal and non-verbal communication, gestures, looks, attitudes, behavior, intonation, i.e., cultural conventions and assumptions. Toward this goal, multimedia and global communication capacities through technology are used to expose students to French in its natural form.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FREN 112 - Elementary French II  with a B+ average

    FREN 211 - Intermediate French I  

    or

    4 years of French at the Secondary School Level, or permission of instructor.



    Credits: 3









Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 200 - World Regional Geography


    This is a basic introductory course in geography designed to develop an understanding and perspective of the major regions of the world.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    GEOG 210 - Cultural Geography


    This course introduces students to cultural geography, the study of how various aspects of culture are expressed spatially.  Global patterns of population, economic            
    organization, forms of government, religion, language and development are surveyed.

    Credits: 3









Health Care Management

  
  •  

    HCMT 486 - Health Care Management Internship


    The internship highlights academic study with a focus in various areas of health care management. It offers students the opportunity to test classroom theory, align career goals, develop a professional outlook, proof communication skills, and deepen the understanding of the functions of health caremanagement in a business setting. Academic credit is dependent upon the number of hours spent at the internship site. Courses for junior and senior business majors only.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPCO 220 - Internship Preparation Seminar  



    Credits: 1-6









Health Promotion

  
  •  

    HLTH 100 - Wellness: A Way of Life


    This course provides students with a basic knowledge and practice of wellness and the importance of lifelong healthful living.   Students are acquainted with such topics as healthy behavior change, stress management, mental health, nutrition and weight management, sexuality, relationships, addictions and physical fitness and activity.  Emphasis is placed on decision-making and personal responsibility for one’s own health.  The class is comprised of lecture and lab components.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 101 - Physical Health and Wellness


    This course provides students with a basic knowledge and practice of physical health and wellness the importance of lifelong healthful living. Students are acquainted with such topics as physical health and fitness, healthy behavior change, stress management, nutrition, weight management, and relationships. The classes comprise a lecture and lab components.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 210 - Consumer and Environmental Health


    This course aids prospective health education majors, as well as interested student consumers, in attaining a better understanding of individual human rights in consumer health from conception until death and in realizing a maximum return for their money and effort spent in the pursuit of optimum wellness.  Students will examine the epidemiology and pathology of major environmental diseases and the attendant psycho-socio-economic implications.

    Credits: 3








  
  •  

    HLTH 260 - Drugs and Society


    This course provides students with a basic knowledge of current drug use and the adverse effects of drug misuse and abuse. The use and misuse of drugs are examined from physiological, psychological, sociological, and intellectual perspectives. This course provides students with an opportunity to examine the various components and issues of drug use, misuse, and abuse in society today.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HLTH 100 - Wellness: A Way of Life  

     

     



    Credits: 3








 

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