Dec 07, 2022  
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Dance

  
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    DANC 150* - Jazz Dance Theory and Technique I


    Designed for the beginning dancer, this course provides an intensive experience in various styles of American jazz dance. It traces the origins of jazz dance from African, European, and American dance forms. Learning experiences include technique class two times a week plus some dance viewing, reading, lecture, and discussion.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    some dance experience or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    DANC 184* - Dance Performance Practicum


    This course bridges the gap between class activity and artistic performance. Students are involved either with one of the on-campus performing dance groups or with an approved off-campus experience.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: .5-2 s.h

  
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    DANC 201 - Teaching Dance


    This course explores materials and methods for teaching dance in various contexts with diverse populations. Emphasis is placed on development of individual teaching skill and creativity, exploration of the foundations of dance, and design and implementation of an effective dance curriculum. Learning experiences include learning and teaching dance; movement exploration and problem-solving; analysis of motor development, creativity, and teaching methods; acquaintance with materials for teaching dance; and curriculum design.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 110, DANC 130, DANC 135, or consent of the instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    DANC 215* - Choreography I


    This course explores various purposes and strategies for dance-making. Emphasis is placed on developing individual creativity, exploring the elements of choreography, and making and critiquing dances. Learning experiences include improvisation, creation of solo and group dance studies, analyzing the choreographic process, critiquing dances, and consideration of production aspects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Dance experience, DANC 110 or consent of the instructor. Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    DANC 216 - Choreography II


    This course explores the craft of choreography in making small and large group dances. Emphasis is placed on developing individual creative process, exploring movement invention, form, content, and dance production. Learning experiences include improvising, problem solving, critiquing, journal writing, research, music listening, attending arts events, rehearsing, and coaching. Dance studies created in this course may be further developed for public performance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 110, 215.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    DANC 260 - Dance and Somatic Movement Therapy


    This course introduces students to the professions of dance/movement therapy and somatic movement therapy. It covers the history and development of the fields, provides experiences in various approaches, and explores applications in various settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 110 and some dance experience.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    DANC 284 - Dance Repertory


    This course provides an opportunity for students to deepen their experience of dance performance by participating in a public performance of an original faculty, guest artist, or professional choreographic work. Repertory projects will be determined in consultation with the instructor. The course may be taken for 1 or 2 credits, and is repeatable up to 4 credits.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DANC 110, 185, or consent of instructor.

    Credits: 1-2 s.h

Drama

  
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    DRAM 101* - Introduction to the Theatre


    This is an introduction to the appreciation and study of theatre playwriting, directing, acting, designing, and criticism. The course stresses the elements of drama, their interaction and integration, and their realization in theatrical production. Learning experiences include lecture/demonstrations, video viewing, small group presentations, and attendance at a professional theatre event.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    DRAM 110* - Acting


    This course is an approach to the techniques of stage acting by classroom exercises in voice, stage movement, characterization, style, and scene study.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    DRAM 115* - Directing Workshop


    Historical research, theory, and practice in directing for the stage, with special emphasis on scene building, is studied. Examination includes an actual performed theatrical piece.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    DRAM 130* - Stage Production


    This course involves the study and practice of stage and lighting design.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    DRAM 140* - Dramatic Workshop I


    In this course, scenery construction and production projects are worked on as required by the Springfield College Theatre, Cultural Affairs, and Best of Broadway productions.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 2 s.h

  
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    DRAM 141* - Dramatic Workshop II


    In this course, scenery construction and production projects are worked on as required by the Springfield College Theatre, Cultural Affairs, and Best of Broadway productions.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 2 s.h

  
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    DRAM 150* - Creative Dramatics and Improvisation


    Creative drama is a non-competitive group experience based on theatre games, exercises, and improvisational techniques that enable the teacher and students to explore together their five senses, imaginative powers, self-concept, interpersonal relationships, and view of the world. Students learn theatrical techniques and methods of guiding and nurturing groups in classroom or rehearsal settings as teachers or directors. Classes include group work in storytelling and readings in theory and practice of creative dramatics.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    DRAM 220* - Scene Study


    This course offers in-depth experience in the analysis and performance styles of scenes from the Shakespearean theater, the realistic theater, and the avant-garde theater. Progress is monitored via the instructor and peer evaluations, short papers, a log, and a final live production.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DRAM 110 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    DRAM 284* - Theatre Performance Practicum


    Students gain accelerated development of their training as actors and intensive opportunity to demonstrate individual and collaborative skills through performance participation in major and supporting roles in the theatre program’s public productions. Students enroll in this course after the required participation, submitting written materials to identify, assess and confirm their learning. May be taken more than once, to a maximum of 10 credits toward graduation.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor and participation in SC Theatre production in major or supporting role;

    Credits: 1-10 s.h


Economics

  
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    ECON 190 - Special Topics in Economics


    This course presents a variety of traditional contemporary economic issues. The course provides a detailed and comprehensive examination of topics, including the historical perspectives, the contemporary concern with, and the future implications of issues presented.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ECON 200* - Principles of Macroeconomics


    This course deals with the concepts of national income, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, unemployment, and economic growth.

    Fulfills social science General Education category.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ECON 205* - Principles of Microeconomics


    This course deals with the market system, the pricing mechanism, industry market structure, and the distribution of income via the factors of production.

    Fulfills social science General Education category.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ECON 301W - Managerial Economics I


    This course analyzes economic principles at the intermediate level. Economic principles are applied to the process of managerial decision-making. Topics covered include demand theory, consumer analysis, theory of cost and production, profit maximization, and decision-making within the various market structures of American capitalism.

    Can fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 and 205.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ECON 302W - Managerial Economics II


    This course continues to apply economic principles to additional areas of managerial decision-making. Special attention is paid to the market for economic resources, practical pricing decisions, regulatory influences on business activity, and the organizational structure of the firm. Emphasis is on current issues, including the special considerations posed in choosing policy alternatives in responding to contemporary economic problems.

    Can fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 301.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ECON 310 - Money and Banking


    This course discusses the nature and function of money, credit, and monetary standards, and the role of the banking system in the economy. Topics include commercial banking, financial intermediaries, monetary theory and policy, the role of the Federal Reserve in stabilization policy, and international monetary economics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 and 205.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ECON 315 - Business and Government


    This course focuses on how businesses interact with government and society. Government (executive, legislative, regulatory, judicial, and international governments) and society (societal institutions, news media, and public sentiment) affect how firms conduct business, and businesses must develop political/nonmarket strategies to interact effectively with government and society that are integrated with their market strategies for economic profits. The international business, government and society interaction is contrasted between the USA and Japan, the European Union, and China. Case studies are used extensively.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 and 205 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ECON 350 - Economics of Sports


    The central focus of this course is on models of sport leagues and what can be learned from those models to answer public policy questions concerning sports. Selected topics from the extensive literature on the economics of sports are used e.g., franchise values, pay for performance, urban financing of stadiums, antitrust laws, and the profit motive in sport leagues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 and ECON 205.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ECON 360 - Economics of Healthcare and Healthcare Reform


    The economics of the healthcare industry are reviewed with reference to the provision, distribution, supply, demand, and consumption of healthcare services. This course focuses on the relevance of economic analytic techniques and their application to processes of health resource allocation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECON 200 and 205.

    Credits: 3 s.h

Education

  
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    EDUC 100 - Introduction to Education


    Students become acquainted with the field of education, the teaching profession, the diversity of learners in US schools, historical and philosophical foundations of education, the study and practice of teaching, and career options for educators. Special emphasis is placed on the development of a preliminary philosophy of education and an electronic portfolio.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EDUC 162 - Introduction to Special Education


    This introductory course is offered for teachers of students with special needs. The characteristics and problems of all types of exceptional children (those with disabilities and the gifted), and the differences in their learning styles within the classroom, are examined. This course provides an overview of federal and state requirements in regard to IDEA, ADA, and Chapter 766. A prepracticum placement is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 225 - Development of Mathematical Concepts in Young Children


    This course furthers the students’ understanding of mathematical concepts, with emphasis on the development of these concepts as they apply to young children. Current cognitive learning theory and instructional strategies for curriculum planning, implementation, and assessment in the early childhood classroom are examined, analyzed, and practiced. Developmentally appropriate curriculum and teaching methods/materials are emphasized. The overall goal is for students to develop a theoretical framework that will inform their instructional decisions.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EDUC 232 - Teaching Elementary Mathematics through the MA Curriculum Frameworks


    Through this course students learn to develop objectives, methods, and materials for the teaching of standards-based mathematics in grades one to six. The course integrates constructivist theory, cooperative learning and thematic teaching. Students design and implement developmentally appropriate learning experiences and authentic assessment tools. Topics of study support the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, MA state teacher test, and the NCTM standards and goals.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EDUC 234 - Curriculum, Methods, and Organization for Secondary Teachers


    In this course, students learn lesson plan development, methods of instruction, and curriculum organization for middle school and high school teaching. Questioning techniques, alternative teaching-learning strategies, classroom innovation, the use of technology and audiovisual media, and the organization of time and teaching material are included. Individualization of teaching is stressed.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 237*W - Foundations of Multicultural Education


    This course introduces students to Multicultural Education theory and practice with a special emphasis on content integration, cross-cultural competencies, and the structural (political, economic, social) and psychological dimensions of oppression and their impact on teaching and learning, critical pedagogy, and the transformation of curriculum. Students will become familiar with Bilingual and English as Second Language (ESL) Education and learn strategies to work with linguistically diverse learners.

    Fulfills General Education category for Social Justice.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    EDUC 305 - Teaching Social Studies through the MA Curriculum Frameworks


    This course introduces prospective teachers to social studies education in elementary and early childhood classes. Students investigate the rationale and purposes for social studies, create personal philosophies related to the teaching of social studies, become familiar with the MA History and Social Studies Frameworks, demonstrate their understandings of various teaching methods and strategies, and incorporate “best practice” into their teaching of the content found in the MA Curriculum Frameworks. This course facilitates disciplined reflective inquiry into the education process through the interaction of theory and practice.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EDUC 318 - Tutorial Pre-Practicum


    This course gives secondary students their first field work experience. They visit schools, observe teaching, and arrange for tutorial work in their content area with pupils who require special help. Students develop and utilize teaching objectives, procedures, and tests to evaluate the achievement of objectives. Students meet regularly with College faculty to discuss their progress toward accomplishing their objectives.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 327W - Methods of Teaching Reading and Language Arts in Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms


    Reading, writing, listening and speaking are integrated through a balanced approach to teaching reading and the language arts. Through course work and classroom teaching, students analyze reading theory, research and practice. Topics include first and second language acquisition, emergent literacy, phonemic awareness, phonics, organizing literacy instruction, assessment and evaluation. Course requirements include 75 hours in an early childhood or elementary supervised pre-practicum experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.

    Credits: 6 s.h
  
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    EDUC 361 - Field Experience in a Non-School Setting


    This is a voluntary educational experience in a non-school setting. Typically, students work in such sites as hospitals, museums, nature preserves, child care centers, and summer camps.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 364 - Pre-Practicum-Teaching and Special Issues in Secondary Education


    This pre-practicum provides experience in high school teaching while concurrently dealing with a range of common problems occurring in secondary schools. Issues such as students’ and teachers’ rights, racism, sexism, equality, and special needs of individuals are considered. The course emphasizes integration of theory with practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 436 - The Microcomputer in the Elementary Classroom


    Students study and practice using the software and computer hardware typically utilized in the elementary school classroom. The course explores the impact of computers on information processing, on their use as a teaching tool, and on their application for curriculum development.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 442 - Assessment and Program Development


    This course acquaints students with formal and informal techniques for assessing and recording the performance of students. Alternative forms of assessment and traditional measurement instruments are used.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 450 - Principles and Practices of Classroom Management


    In this course, the student examines effective approaches to student and classroom management. Positive approaches in behavior management for the individual student and/or group are explored.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 455 - Early Childhood Curriculum and Care


    The participants examine the research for making thoughtful and informed decisions about early childhood education and care. Topics of study include the importance of play; developing appropriate social/emotional, cognitive/language, and physical environments; working with infants, toddlers, preschoolers and primary-aged children; and the importance of working with families of young children. Participants evaluate the impact of parenting roles and responsibilities on strengthening the well-being of individuals and families.  (Meets initial licensing requirements for early childhood and health).              

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 456 - Accommodating Student Needs in the Classroom


    This course focuses on disabling conditions and their implications for education and service delivery. Students develop effective strategies for inclusion of individuals with special needs in the classroom. IEP development, learning styles, and instructional strategies to promote success for all students are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDUC 162 and 242.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 457 - Organization and Administration of Preschool Programs


    This course examines administration of day care and early childhood education programs, including program design, inclusionary programs for children with and without special needs, licensing requirements, funding and budgeting, personnel roles, management, and the day-to-day administration of a center. This course fulfills part of the requirements for Office for Children certification as a Director I day care administrator.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EDUC 463 - Practicum Seminar


    This course taken concurrently with a Student Teaching Practicum is designed to help students become reflective teachers by providing a forum for collaborative, critical inquiry based on their student teaching experience. The course offers opportunities and frameworks for thinking about and analyzing classroom situations, the teaching-learning process, classroom management, legal and ethical obligations, current issues in education, and professional goals and development.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 464 - Middle School Practicum


    This culminating experience gives students the opportunity to plan, organize, and manage a middle school classroom for eight weeks. Students complete a minimum of 150 hours at the middle school level. This course is for students seeking dual certification as high school and middle school teachers.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDUC 318, 364, and advanced standing in the Education Department. Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.

    Credits: 7-14 s.h
  
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    EDUC 465 - High School Practicum


    This culminating experience gives students the opportunity to plan, organize, and manage a high school classroom for eight weeks. Students complete a minimum of 150 hours at the high school level. This course is for students seeking dual certification as high school and middle school teachers.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EDUC 318, 364, and advanced standing in the Education Department. Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.

    Credits: 7-14 s.h
  
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    EDUC 466 - Practicum PreK to K


    This culminating experience gives students the opportunity to plan, organize, and manage an early childhood classroom for seven weeks. Students complete a minimum of 100 hours at the preschool level. (Either EDUC 466 or 467 must be in a setting that includes children with special needs.)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.

    Credits: 7 s.h
  
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    EDUC 467 - Practicum 1-2


    This culminating experience gives students the opportunity to plan, organize, and manage an elementary classroom for seven weeks. Students complete a minimum of 200 hours at first or second grade level. (Either EDUC 466 or 467 must be in a setting that includes children with special needs.)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.

    Credits: 7 s.h
  
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    EDUC 468 - Elementary Practicum


    This culminating experience gives students the opportunity to plan, organize, and manage an elementary classroom for fifteen weeks. Students complete a minimum of 300 hours at 1-6 level.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.

    Credits: 14 s.h
  
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    EDUC 469 - Practicum


    Arrangements must be made individually with the department.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.

    Credits: 7-14 s.h
  
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    EDUC 471 - Learning, Teaching, and Technology


    This course integrates technology with meaningful learning and teaching. The goal of this course is to demonstrate how technology helps to fulfill the new vision for learning and teaching described by state and national frameworks. The emphasis is on designing and implementing projects through technology that offer students the opportunity to construct new knowledge, develop collaboration skills, apply knowledge to new situations, and integrate subjects across the curriculum.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CISC 105 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EDUC 481 - Assessment and Evaluation for the Classroom Teacher


    This course presents students with the theory and practice of assessment and evaluation in the classroom setting. The purpose, design, implementation, and interpretation of evaluative procedures to assess student learning are examined and practiced. Students practice designing alternative forms of assessment for students with special needs and diverse learning styles. Alternative forms of assessment and traditional measurement instruments are compared and contrasted.

    Credits: 3 s.h

Emergency Medical Services Management

  
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    EMSM 114 - CPR, Health Care Provider


    The CPR course prepares the student to mitigate those situations resulting in foreign-body airway obstruction and sudden cardiac arrest in adults, infants, and children. The training includes manual, mechanical, and electronic techniques. Successful completion results in certification from the American Heart Association.

    Credits: 0.5 s.h
  
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    EMSM 115 - Emergency Medical Technician-Basic


    Basic training consists of 130 hours of lecture, laboratory, and scenario settings that exceed the national standard curriculum, and prepares the student to be certified through the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The subjects covered include patient assessment, semi-automatic external defibrillation, wound care, splinting and immobilization, oxygen therapy, assisted medications, report writing, communication and general knowledge of the ambulance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 114 or successful challenge CPR exam.

    Credits: 4 s.h
  
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    EMSM 135 - EMS Career Planning


    Lectures and discussions provide an overview of EMS systems, areas of specialization, legislative processes, and regulatory processes and problem solving. Students are required to study the issues in EMS and respond to them employing critical thinking.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EMSM 150 - EMT-Intermediate


    This course includes detailed patient assessment, advanced treatment of shock, pre-hospital intravenous therapy, endotracheal intubation and other advanced airway control measures.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 115 or permission of the medical director.

    Credits: 4 s.h
  
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    EMSM 160 - EMT-Intermediate Clinical Affiliation


    This is a clinical practicum consisting of one half-semester of performing invasive procedures in local hospitals under the direct supervision of physicians, nurses, and technicians. Areas of affiliation include the emergency department, intravenous therapy team, respiratory therapy department, and the operating room. Students are required to document the successful completion of the following skills endotracheal intubations, intravenous insertions, and patient assessments. Documentation of clinical case studies is also required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CORI, 3.0 average in EMSM 150 or permission of the medical director.

    Credits: 1.5 s.h
  
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    EMSM 186 - Intermediate Field Internship


    This course consists of one half-semester of pre-hospital care internship performing invasive procedures under the supervision of certified preceptors.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 160.

    Credits: 1.5 s.h
  
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    EMSM 200 - EMT-Paramedic I


    This course begins the paramedic program and includes instruction in the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic, legal aspects of EMS, stress management, rescue and hazardous materials training, medical terminology, patient assessment, advanced airway management, pathophysiology and treatment of shock, burn trauma therapy, and pre-hospital pharmacology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 115 and permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 4 s.h
  
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    EMSM 201 - Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support


    This course provides a philosophic overview to prehospital trauma care, stressing the need to identify and consider the multisystem trauma patient as a unique entity with specific needs. The course also provides the prehospital provider with a specific body of knowledge related to the assessment and care of the trauma patient. Successful completion of the course results in certification at the provider level.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 200 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    EMSM 202 - Pharmacology


    The Pharmacology for EMS Providers course is designed to give prehospital professionals the core module for the pharmacology component of the DOT Paramedic national standard curriculum.  This course will cover the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, precautions, routes and dosages, side effects, and EMS considerations.

    Credits: 1 s.h.
  
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    EMSM 211 - Basic Cardiac Life Support Instructor


    The BCLS instructor course provides the student with the training in skills and methodology to teach all levels of basic cardiac life support under the auspices of the American Heart Association. The course includes discussion of the methodologies of teaching in various cultural settings, and a teaching practicum with an experienced AHA-BCLS Instructor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 114 or permission of Instructor/Trainer.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EMSM 250 - EMT-Paramedic II


    This course includes instruction in cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, and assessment and management of cardiac emergencies, as well as mechanical, electrical, and pharmacological intervention according to national advanced life support standards. Students learn electrocardiograph monitoring, dysrhythmia recognition and treatment, and cardiovascular pharmacology and administration.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 200.

    Credits: 4 s.h
  
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    EMSM 251 - Advanced Cardiac Life Support


    This course prepares the student to mitigate those medical situations resulting in foreign body airway obstruction and sudden cardiac arrest in adults, infants, and children using manual, mechanical, pharmaceutical, and electronic therapies. Successful completion results in certification from the American Heart Association.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 200 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    EMSM 300 - EMT-Paramedic III


    This course completes the didactic portion of the paramedic program. It includes recognition and treatment of endocrine emergencies, central nervous system disorders, the acute abdomen, anaphylaxis, alcoholism, environmental and behavioral emergencies, pediatric emergencies, and an all-course review.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 250.

    Credits: 4 s.h
  
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    EMSM 301 - Pediatric Advanced Life Support


    This course prepares the student to recognize and treat foreign body airway obstruction and sudden cardiac arrest in infants and children using manual, mechanical, and electronic therapies. Successful completion results in certification from the American Heart Association.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 300 or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    EMSM 302 - Pediatric Educ/Pre-Hosp Professional


    The Pediatric Education for Prehospital Professionals is designed to give prehospital professionals the education, skills, and confidence they need to effectively treat pediatric patients at the highest prehospital level.

    Credits: 1 s.h.
  
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    EMSM 325 - System Status Management


    This course uses the United States Department of Transportation’s emergency dispatcher standard curriculum to provide the knowledge, skills, and tools to deal with the general public when rendering emergency assistance by telephone. The course also provides students with the mechanisms to direct appropriate resources to the scene of an illness or injury.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EMSM 335 - Plan and Design of Emergency Vehicles and Facilities


    This course acquaints students with the process of planning and design of emergency medical services facilities and vehicles. A study of the managerial roles in this process is emphasized, as well as design technologies, safety, and maintenance. Select facilities and EMS vehicles are studied in detail.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EMSM 340 - EMS Continuing Education and EMT-Basic Refresher


    This course provides the basic refresher and continuing education requirements for recertification as an EMT-Basic.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EMSM 350 - EMT-Paramedic Clinical Affiliation


    In this course, students are required to document successful performance of invasive skills under the supervision and direction of licensed hospital personnel. Areas of affiliation include the emergency department, the intravenous therapy team, the operating room, labor and delivery, ICU/CCU, the psychiatric unit, and pediatrics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Completion of EMSM 200-301 with a 3.0 average or permission of the medical director.

    Credits: 4 s.h
  
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    EMSM 374 - Fundamentals of Search and Rescue


    FUNSAR is designed to prepare the student to participate in search and rescue as a member of a search team. The course covers topics such as visual human-tracking, survival, wilderness first aid, land navigation, search tactics, tactical aspects of the Incident Command System, and lost person behavior. Successful completion of the course results in certification from the National Association for Search and Rescue.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    EMSM 375 - Search and Rescue Management


    This course provides skills and materials that include decision-making practice in determining missing person detectability and survivability, and statistical and topographic analysis of lost person behavior. Successful completion results in certification from the National Association for Search and Rescue.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    EMSM 386 - EMT-Paramedic Field Internship


    Students are assigned to licensed advanced life support ambulance services and work under the direction of qualified paramedic preceptors. Procedures include field endotracheal intubation, intravenous therapy, intravenous drug administration, and advanced cardiac life support care.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EMSM 350.

    Credits: 4 s.h
  
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    EMSM 420W - EMS Management Senior Project


    This guided individual study is to be completed in the final semester of the senior year. Topics must be pertinent to one or more areas of emergency medical services and are selected with the counsel of the course instructor.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    EMSM 486W - EMS Management Internship


    In this course, students complete supervised experience divided into two or more of the following EMS concentrations: operations management, systems implementation, regulation, legislation, and product research and development.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h


English

  
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    ENGL 100 - Writing Studio


    Writing studios are small support groups made up of four students that provide supplemental instruction and assistance to students who need extra help meeting the requirements of ENGL 113 and ENGL 114. Through self-assessment and writing samples, identified students enroll for one credit along with regular enrollment in ENGL 113 and ENGL 114. Grades are determined by attendance, participation, and completion of assigned work. This course can be repeated once, for a total of 2 credits.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ENGL 108 - Oral English


    This course examines the principles and techniques of informative and persuasive public speaking. Heavy emphasis is placed upon student performance.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    ENGL 113* - College Writing I


    This course provides instruction in the skills of written communication, including sentence structure, paragraph building, and the organization and development of expository essays. Students are introduced to strategies for critical reading, basic research methods, and documentation of sources. Computer-based writing is integral to the course.

    Fulfills General Education category English requirement.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 114* - College Writing II


    This course continues the work of College Writing I, but focuses on more complex expository and argumentative writing, critical textual analysis, and more sophisticated research strategies. Computer-based writing is integral to the course.

    Fulfills General Education category English requirement.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 155 - Efficient Reading


    This course is aimed at increasing students’ reading efficiency by eliminating excessive eye fixations, regression, and subvocalizing.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ENGL 209* - Great Books


    This course is a study and analysis of some of the greatest pieces of literature of the Western cultural heritage. Beginning with the literature of the Greeks (the epics, plays), it includes the literary genres of Italy, England, Germany, France, and America. At least eight to ten pieces of literature (including genres in addition to those above) are required reading.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 215* - Readings in Literature


    This course includes readings which evaluate a variety of classical and contemporary pieces organized around a major theme, issue, genre, or event. The literature may be selected from any one or more writers or periods of the Eastern or Western worlds.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 216* - The Athlete in Literature


    This course undertakes an analysis of selected prose and poetry depicting the athlete as an individual and team member. Positive values and major issues of the sport experience are explored. Such writers as Virgil, Twain, Hemingway, Lardner, Schulberg, and others are studied for their themes and literary merit.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 220 - Traditional Grammar and Usage


    This course examines rules of traditional grammar and usage in writing. Recent trends in usage are given special consideration.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENGL 226*W - Creative Writing


    This course introduces students to creative writing and includes fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. Students learn how to tap their lives for writing material and how to use that material in various writing forms.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 230* - Post-Colonial Literature


    Persons who have cultural ties to countries formerly ruled by colonial powers write post-colonial literature. This poetry, drama, and prose often describes how such persons are affected by both the legacy of colonialism, the systematic occupation and domination of one country by another, and decolonization, the process by which colonies become self-governing or independent. In addition, this literature often explores strategies former colonies have used to survive in a world dominated by global capitalism. This course examines post-colonial literature written in four regions of the world Latin America and the Caribbean, Australia and Oceania, Asia, and Africa and the Middle East.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 231 - Tutoring in English


    This course gives student peer tutors some pointers on how to communicate grammar, syntax, and spelling rules to students for whom writing is difficult. The course also offers suggestions for helping students develop and organize content, follow directions for writing assignments, and deal with specific writing tasks, including the research paper.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ENGL 232 - Tutoring in English Practicum I


    This course is a practicum or internship as a peer tutor in the College Writing Center. Students tutor for a minimum of three contact hours per week throughout the semester. This course may be taken by Writing Center tutors with experience prior to the creation of ENGL 231.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 231 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ENGL 233 - Tutoring in English Practicum II


    This course is a practicum or internship as a peer tutor in the College Writing Center. Students tutor for a minimum of three contact hours per week throughout the semester. This course may be taken concurrently with ENGL 232.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 231 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ENGL 234 - Student Newspaper Practicum


    This course is designed to provide students with practical experience in writing, editing, headline writing, and layout of a student newspaper. Each student receives a varied weekly assignment from the editor-in-chief of the College’s student newspaper. This course may be repeated up to a maximum of eight semester hours.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ENGL 241W - Survey of American Literature I


    This course, covering American literature from approximately 1600 to 1865, examines the lives and works of the following authors: Bradstreet, Taylor, Franklin, Irving, Bryant, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, and others.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 242W - Survey of American Literature II


    This course, covering American literature from 1865 to the present, examines the lives and works of the following authors: Whitman, Twain, Dickinson, James, Crane, London, Wharton, Frost, Robinson, Wolfe, Eliot, Steinbeck, Hemingway, Faulkner, and others.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 251* - Survey of African American Literature I


    This course traces African American self-expression in autobiographical and imaginative forms from 1760 to the 1930’s, noting the educational, social, economic, political, and legal limitations within which, or against which, they were produced.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice, or fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 252* - Survey of African American Literature II


    This course presents African American literary works from the 1930’s into the 1980’s and relates them to the literary efforts produced by other Americans and to the folklore, history, and socio-political backgrounds from which they came.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice, or fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 261*W - Survey of British Literature I


    This course examines British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. The focus is on how the literature reveals the forces that influence the cultural and intellectual characteristics of the periods.

    May fulfill WAC. Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 262*W - Survey of British Literature II


    This course surveys British literature from the beginning of the Romantic period to the present. It examines the work of individual authors within their literary period and also explores the way the larger socioeconomic and historical contexts shaped their works.

    Fulfills General Education category literature. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 270*W - American Nature Writers


    This course introduces the student to a selection of American nature writers. The class examines nature writing as a unique and exceptional form of writing. Students read selections from such authors as Thoreau, Austin, Leopold, Beston, Carson, and Abbey.

    Fulfills General Education category literature. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 272* - Native American Literature


    The focus of this course is on Native American oral and literary expression. Traditional Native American biographies, speeches, and legends, and contemporary Native American short stories and novels are read.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice, or General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 275* - Women and Literature


    In this course, students read literature written by women and study the literary tradition and critical reception of women writers. Particular emphasis is placed on the cultural position of women in the United States, emphasizing racial, ethnic, and class diversity.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice, or General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 301W - Advanced Composition


    This course teaches selection, organization, presentation of material, and principles of writing.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

 

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