Dec 09, 2021  
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Religion

  
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    RELI 425* - Spirituality and Healing


    This course examines the influence of spirituality and its concrete expressions in the form of faith communities, on cultural understanding of disease, illness, healing, health and wellness.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h


Research

  
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    RSCH 141 - Guided Individual Study


    This course provides undergraduate students the opportunity to work individually under the supervision of an instructor to further their own personal and professional development. The normal registration is for two semester hours per semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Approval by the chairperson of the department concerned and by the instructor who has agreed to act as supervisor.

    Credits: 2-6 s.h
  
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    RSCH 610 - Fundamentals and Methods of Research


    Fundamentals and Methods of Research

    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
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    RSCH 612 - Proposal Design


    Proposal Design

    Credits: 2 s.h.
  
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    RSCH 620 - Educational and Psychological Statistics I


    Educational and Psychological Statistics I

    Credits: 3 s.h.

Science Education

  
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    SCIE 144* - Best Practices in Learning and Teaching Science


    This course combines theory and practice of learning and teaching science. Students learn selected principles of science compatible with the Curriculum Frameworks of Science through constructing their own understanding of them. Using best practices of teaching science, students apply their own understanding about these principles to teaching elementary children. Along with the field experiences, students will visit different school types to observe science taught in different settings.

    Fulfills Natural Science General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

    Credits: 4 s.h

  
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    SCIE 145 - Earth Science


    This course presents earth and space science in a system approach which emphasizes the categories of the Earth’s various spheres and human activities. This unifying theme falls into the categories of Matter and Energy in the Earth Systems, Earth’s Sources of Energy, Earth’s Processes and Cycles, and The Origin and Evolution of the Universe. Students will review geological, meteorological, oceanographic, and astronomical data, learn about direct and indirect evidence and consider how these might be used to test competing theories about the origin of the stars, plants, and our own solar system.

    Credits: 4 s.h

Sociology

  
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    SOCI 101* - Introduction to Sociology


    This course provides an introduction to sociological thought, research, concepts, and theory.

    Fulfills social science General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 133W - The YMCA Past, Present, and Future


    This course provides an understanding of the development of the YMCA movement, including its past, present status, and future trends. The development of social, religious, and educational philosophies are studied along with past and present programs. Pertinent issues of the YMCA are examined as it responds to changing needs and challenges. This course is recommended for those considering a career with the YMCA.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 210* - Social Problems


    This course examines specific social problems in the context of social structure and culture, with special attention given to issues of social justice.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 220W - Families in Society


    This course focuses on the sociological analysis of the family, its development as a social institution, its relationship to society, and its contribution to personality.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 245* - The Sociology of Genocide and the Holocaust


    This course analyzes the causes of and ways to prevent genocide which is based upon hatred of ethnic, racial, and religious categories. Special attention is given to the Nazi Holocaust, which descended upon the Jews of Europe. Not offered every year.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 312* - Women and Society


    This class focuses on sociological analysis of gender relations. Sociological concepts and theories help to explain both differences and inequalities between men and women in United States society.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 322* - Racial and Ethnic Relations


    This course examines U.S. racial and ethnic relations by using sociological concepts and theories. Explanations of racial and ethnic oppression are emphasized.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 332*W - Social Gerontology


    Social gerontology is concerned with the demography of aging and its impact on social interaction and the social structure. The course reviews current theories and research methodologies used in social gerontology. Attention is given to cross-cultural comparisons of aging, and an examination is made of the political and social issues surrounding aging in contemporary societies.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice. May fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 337 - Sociology of Death and Dying


    This course examines death as an institution by focusing on death and social values, cultural components of grief, and social functions of bereavement. Particular attention is paid to the social organization of death and dying in bureaucratic settings; e.g., hospitals, mental hospitals, nursing homes, etc. Dying is studied as a social process, with attention given to the theoretical perspectives in sociology used to study death, grief, and bereavement. Sociological concepts and current research in the field are reviewed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 341 - Group Work


    This course is an introduction to group work methods. The course concentrates on teaching the essential techniques and behaviors used by group workers in a variety of settings. Individual relevant cases and examples of the application of group work techniques in community services are explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 347 - Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work


    This course is a survey of social welfare services in the United States, with an emphasis on current needs and programs. This course studies the various programs and services that are established in communities as responses to perceived social problems in these localities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 355W - Theories and Methods of Case Management


    This course explores the theory, principles, and methods of casework in various social agency settings. Attention is focused on identifying and assessing situational problems using social and social psychological variables.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 375 - Cities and Communities


    The characteristics and functions of cities and metropolitan areas have changed as a result of new economic, social, and political realities in the U.S. and the world. This course focuses on the consequences of these changes on urban communities and the people who live in them. Using an assets approach, and using Springfield as our case study, the course explores effective community development strategies that can be used to both evaluate and intervene in various aspects of the “urban crisis.”

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 388 - Special Topics in Applied Sociology


    This course is a comprehensive examination of a contemporary issue or social problem of importance to society.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 410* - Poverty and Wealth Class in Society


    This course begins by documenting economic inequality and discussing myths that prevent people from fully comprehending this inequality. A variety of sociological concepts and theories is used to analyze the causes and consequences of the economic inequality. Sociological analysis and critique of the mechanics of the capitalist system in the United States are a central focus of the class.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 415W - Proposal Writing and Fundraising


    This course analyzes the methods of writing funding proposals for social agencies. Methods of identifying potential funding sources, as well as the process of drawing up proposals and fundraising events are studied.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 420 - Media and Society


    This course is focused on the mass media, including television, film, newspapers, magazines, and radio. A variety of sociological theories is employed to understand the relationship between media texts, production, and consumption. The class examines the relationship between society and the mass media, especially in regard to issues of power. The students analyze the studies of others and perform their own analyses. Offered during alternate years.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 430 - Medical Sociology


    This course surveys health-related and medical-related behavior. The course is divided into three parts principles and theory in the field of medical sociology, the analysis of the professions and health care institutions, and the issues confronting health care in the United States.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 433W - YMCA Management and Continuity Planning


    This course is a study of present-day management concepts and practices, program development, and planning objectives for the administration and operation of the YMCA. Management models of selected YMCA’s are studied. Methods and strategies pertinent to the continuation and implementation of YMCA’s and other agencies are explored. Recommended for students planning a career with the YMCA.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SOCI 450 - Social Change


    This course is an analysis of the various processes of social change associated with different historical periods and forms of social organization. Particular attention is given to historical and contemporary trends as they relate to substantive changes in the structure of society.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 461 - The Community Development Process


    This course deals with the parallel between the community problem-solving process and the steps of scientific inquiry. It discusses the concrete functional relations between face-to-face small group processes and the processes of the macro-system.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SOCI 486 - Internship in Applied Sociology


    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply sociocultural theory and methods outside of the classroom. Under close supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Sociology/Anthropology, students are permitted to work in a milieu of their vocational organizations; e.g., criminal justice, welfare services, census bureaus, museums, and polling organizations. This provides students with career choices, future employment contacts, and pre-professional experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3-9 s.h
  
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    SOCI 492W - Social Research and Program Evaluation


    This course examines methods of social research. An introduction is made to research procedures such as research design, methods of data collection, and the examination of various studies. Construction of actual research designs and instruments by individuals or groups of students is conducted. Limited enrollment.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101, suggested PSYC 211

    Credits: 3 s.h


Spanish

  
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    SPAN 103* - Culture and Language of Spain


    This course provides a fundamental understanding of Peninsular culture, history, and language.

    Fulfills General Education category for second language, but not the requirement for a B.A. degree.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SPAN 104* - Latin American Culture and Language


    This course provides a fundamental understanding of the Spanish language, as well as the history and cultures of the Spanish-speaking people of the Americas.

    Fulfills General Education category for second language, but not the requirement for a B.A. degree.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SPAN 111* - Elementary Spanish I


    This course emphasizes the development of basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Learning to communicate effectively in Spanish and introducing Spanish-American and Peninsular cultures is another major course objective. Active classroom participation and laboratory experience are required. Any student who offers for entrance credit three or more years of high school Spanish may not enter the first-year level (SPAN 111 or 112) at Springfield College.

    Fulfills General Education category second language/culture.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SPAN 112* - Elementary Spanish II


    This course is a continuation of SPAN 111.  It progressively develops listening,        
    speaking, reading, and writing skills in order to enhance students’ ability to       
    communicate effectively.  Aspects of culture of the Spanish-speaking world are explored.

    Fulfills General Education category second language/culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPAN 111 or the successful completion of two years of high school Spanish.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SPAN 113* - Communication in Spanish


    This course is designed for students who have an interest in a pragmatic application for the language and who are interested in communicating orally with native speakers, enhancing career opportunities, and increasing cultural awareness. Its content is tailored for students majoring in health-related professions, education, and social sciences.

    Fulfills General Education category second language/culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPAN 111 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SPAN 211* - Intermediate Spanish I


    This course is an expansion in the development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Students are introduced to the culture and literature of Spain and Spanish America and are expected to communicate in both oral and written Spanish. Class is conducted in Spanish.

    Fulfills General Education category second language/culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPAN 112, three or more years of high school Spanish, or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SPAN 212* - Intermediate Spanish II


    Learning to communicate effectively in Spanish, both orally and in writing, through
    the expansion of the vocabulary, increased grammatical accuracy, and paragraph-level
    discourse, is a major goal of the course.  Aspects of the various cultures of the      
    Spanish-speaking world is integrated into all areas of study.

    Fulfills General Education category second language/culture for a BA degree.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SPAN 211, three or more years of high school Spanish, or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h


Special Courses

  
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    SPCO 101 - First-Year Success


    This course aids in the transition from high school to college, provides knowledge of campus resources, and assists in the development of a strong and helpful relationship between students and their advisors. This course also teaches the development of time management, use of textbooks, note taking, review of course materials, and studying for examinations. Required for students in the undeclared major, may be taken by other first-year students as an elective.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    SPCO 107 - Study Skills


    Study skills are primarily information-processing procedures that facilitate the learning, retention, and application of knowledge and skill. Learning how to learn is the focus of the course. Listening, note-taking, surveying texts, asking useful questions, improving memory, gaining from discussions, and preparing for exams are included. This is not a remedial course.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    SPCO 188 - First Year Seminar


    This course is designed to help students demonstrate the mission of the College 
    by transitioning successfully to "engaged" membership in the SC community. As 
    such, first year students will be challenged through learning opportunities designed 
    to enhance their self- reflection and critical thinking skills as they make choices 
    related to engagement in their program of study and in the co-curriculum. Designed to 
    build a base of individual knowledge, skills, and attitudes for emerging membership 
    in the community of SC graduates as leaders in service, learning opportunities will 
    
    
    provide experiential support for the academic and social skills needed by those who are successful Springfield College students.


    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
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    SPCO 201 - Building Communication and Literacy Skills


    This course develops skills in reading and writing. Reading skills developed include critical reasoning, the identification of main ideas, detail, writer’s purpose, and idea relationships. Students develop the ability to write a written summary and directed composition with mastery using proper mechanics. The decision to focus on reading or writing will be determined by individual student needs.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    SPCO 499 - Fieldwork in an Educational Setting


    This fieldwork experience is done in an educational setting. Students have the opportunity to observe and assist educators, as well as take full responsibility as an educator in a particular educational setting.

    Credits: 1-14 s.h

Sport Management and Recreation

  
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    SMRT 101 - Introduction to Sport Management


    This course introduces students to general principles and practices in the sport industry. Students gain a general understanding and appreciation of career options that they will be prepared for as they complete the sport management major.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    SMRT 103 - Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services


    This course introduces the student to the foundations of recreation and leisure services. Basic terminology, theories of play, a historical perspective of recreation and leisure, an examination of available leisure resources, and an overview of employment opportunities in the field are included.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 106 - Dynamics of Leadership


    This course is designed to introduce the student to theories, approaches, and styles of leadership utilized in the recreation profession. Topics for study include decision-making strategies, motivation techniques, principle-centered leadership, values, and ethical considerations. Additional areas include examination of communication processes, vision, and group dynamics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 103.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 116 - Event Management and Promotions


    This course focuses on fundamentals of event management and including basic promotional ideas. This will include: program planning process, identification of events/programs in the sport and recreation industry, programming formats, scheduling, evaluation methods, risk management, as well as, other factors involved in event planning/management.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 204 - Outdoor Leadership


    This course is designed to augment a broad range of backcountry, climbing and paddle sport skills essential to the outdoor professional. The course is a balance between theory, skill acquisition, and skill application. Course scheduling includes full day modules, weekends, and two extended outdoor adventure expeditions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PEAC 101, 118, 195, and SMRT 106, and 275. Instructor permission is required prior to registration.

    Credits: 6 s.h
  
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    SMRT 253 - Processes and Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation


    This course is designed to provide an overview of processes and techniques used in treatment-oriented programs. Processes include assessing, establishing behavioral objectives, activity analysis and selection, documentation, charting terms, and evaluation. Techniques covered include, but are not limited to, behavior modification, recreation counseling, and group methodology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 272.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 255 - Introduction to Outdoor Recreation


    This course includes a detailed examination of the meaning, scope, and value of outdoor education/recreation. Emphasis is given to the historical and philosophical foundations of outdoor education/recreation, the direct application to instructional procedures for providing outdoor education/recreation, and the planning and administration of such programs. Significant trends and existing outdoor education programs are also examined. This course utilizes practical experiences.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 272* - Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation


    This introductory survey course is offered as a means to realize and understand the history, potential, opportunities, nature, and problems of therapeutic recreation. The course addresses the concept of therapeutic recreation; persons with disabling conditions; and where, how, and why therapeutic recreation services are provided.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SMRT 275 - Adventure Education Theory and Practice


    This course is a practicum that teaches how to plan, implement, and evaluate adventure education experience groups in outdoor settings. Students have the opportunity for supervised practical experience in group leadership. Instruction utilizes the ropes course as a tool for working with groups. Topics such as experimental education, adventure education, group dynamics, leadership styles, equipment, and safety are also stressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PEAC 193 and PEPC 293.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 281* - Leisure Services for Persons with Disabilities


    This course emphasizes the importance, value, and significance of recreation services for/with people with disabilities. Issues of social justice, including ableism, identification of barriers and strategies for breaking barriers, program planning with “special needs” populations, sensitivity awareness, and identification of disabling conditions and diseases are included. This course is designed for the non-therapeutic recreation major.

    Fulfills General Education category for social justice.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SMRT 284 - Clinical Practicum In Therapeutic Recreation


    This practicum will be primarily directed at the student gaining practical experiences. Emphasis will be on students gaining familiarity with the client population. The agency/institution philosophy, treatment approaches and general procedures. Student learning will focus on the development of observational skills, client characteristics and initial leadership experience.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 304 - Marketing Issues in Sport and Recreation


    This course examines the application of marketing principles to the sport industry with an emphasis on event and athlete marketing, corporate sponsorship, and marketing research.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MGTE 121 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 348 - Management of Leisure Services


    This course examines the basic principles, theories, and applications of management and administration of the leisure delivery system. Emphasis is placed on systems development, human resources, quality control, marketing strategies, and customer service techniques. Additional areas include purpose of mission statements, TQM, project teams, organizational behaviors, and ethical considerations.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 350W - Public Relations


    This course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge of public relations by focusing on its practices, concepts, and evolution. Primary concepts include: public relations as a management function; the marketing, advertising, and research process; media relations; communications; and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on cases analysis, problem solving, development, presentation of student campaigns, and examination of public relation practices in modern society.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SMRT 361 - Facility Design, Operations and Maintenance


    This course acquaints students with the scope and complexity of the design, operation and upkeep of sport and recreation facilities. The students develop an awareness of the wide variety of disciplines necessary for the construction and competent administration of major sport and recreation venues including stadiums, golf courses, aquatic centers, ski areas, playing fields, ice arenas and other facilities and areas common to the sports world.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 378 - Customer Service


    This course is designed to prepare students to demonstrate comprehension and application of quality customer service strategies, theories and initiatives. Students identify and analyze contemporary issues, cycles of service, and service strategy models. The dynamics of effective communication techniques and design and implementation of service delivery systems are appraised and synthesized. Analysis of service delivery enterprises are utilized.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 384 - Practicum


    This practicum is directed at students gaining practical experience in their chosen areas of emphasis. Students become familiar with the client population and the agency/institution philosophy, programming approaches and general procedures. Students develop observational skills, gain understanding of client characteristics and practice initial leadership skills. Students are required to complete at least one hundred and twenty clock hours of satisfactory work under the direct supervision of a qualified professional and attend scheduled practicum seminars.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 392 - Independent Study in Sport or Recreation Management


    This course provides undergraduate students the opportunity to work individually under the supervision of an instructor to further their own personal and professional development. The normal registration is for two semester hours per semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Approval by the chairperson of the department concerned and by the instructor who has agreed to act as supervisor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 405W - History and Philosophy of Leisure and Recreation


    In this course, students review and discuss the evolution of leisure beginning with the Greek philosophers and including the noted writings of selected leisure theorists. The works of Aristotle, DeGrazia, Huizinga, Kando, Kaplan, Kraus, Murphy, and others are explored. Students are required to conceptualize and present their own concise philosophy of leisure.

    May fulfill WAC requirement.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    SMRT 411 - Community Based Therapeutic Recreation Service


    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the management and development of community based therapeutic recreation service. Emphasis is placed on legislation, community based protocols, inclusion, rights, and needs of persons with disabilities for therapeutic recreation service. A practical professional field assignment/project is required.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 417 - Research in Sport and Recreation


    This course examines the research of individuals, organizations and populations   
    involved in sport management and recreation.  Students explore the concepts developed in relevant literature as they apply to sport management and recreation. Students are introduced to methods and techniques used in research, in recreation management, and the sport industry.

    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
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    SMRT 419 - Camp Programming and Administration


    This course consists of lecture and laboratory sessions designed to cover selected organizations and administrative details in organized camping including budget, camp sites, buildings and equipment, publicity, recruitment, insurance, nutrition, health safety, and current trends.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 420 - Introduction to Sport Governance


    This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the role of governance structures in sport. The primary aim is to familiarize students with a basic understanding of organizational structures used in the management and governance of sport. Topics and issues discussed will involve organizational theory, behavior and governance structure used in amateur and professional sport organization.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 426 - Management of Natural Resources


    This course is designed to enable the student to develop an understanding of management concepts and practices and the interrelationship of land, water, flora, and fauna resources. Emphasis is placed on forestry principals, wildlife management, watershed protection, and soil conservation in the framework of the basic concept of multiple use.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 430 - Leisure Counseling


    This course is designed to provide an examination of the historical, philosophical, and developmental aspects of leisure counseling and its relationship to leisure education. An analysis of personal attitudes, values, and self-concepts is combined with an overview of the functions of the counselor, models of techniques of leisure counseling, and guidelines for developing a leisure counseling program in a variety of settings.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 433 - Hospitality and Food Service Management


    This course is designed to apply management and marketing concepts to the hospitality and food service industry.  Primary concepts include an understanding and application of customer service, purchasing and receiving, point of sale marketing, inventory control, staffing and personnel, and governmental regulations.  Emphasis is placed on working with professionals in the field and utilizing the concepts learned in prior classes in the sport management and recreation field.

    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
  •  

    SMRT 435 - Program Planning


    Principles and methods of program development and delivery are explored. Emphasis is on understanding participant behavior, participant needs and the ways in which organizations create services to respond to those needs.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 470 - Therapeutic Recreation for the Older Adult and Persons with Chronic Illness


    This course provides an overview of the various concepts, principles, and practices related to the planning and delivery of therapeutic recreation and recreation and leisure services to persons with chronic illness and older adults.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 473 - Therapeutic Recreation Programming for Persons with Disabilities


    This course is designed to familiarize and prepare the student with the essential principles and elements involved in planning, organizing, conducting, supervising, and promoting therapeutic recreation programs. General modifications and adaptations necessary in facilities, equipment, and program design are examined for individuals with mental retardation; physical, social, or emotional disability; learning disability; mental illness; chronic illness; and the older adult. Emphasis is placed on practical application in a variety of settings to better meet the needs, interests, and potential of persons with disabilities.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 474 - Child Life Concepts and Theories in Working with the Hospitalized Child


    This course is designed to introduce the field of child life by focusing on its evolution and modern-day concepts, as well as theories related specifically to its implementation in a health care setting. Concepts include child life in a health care setting, the effects of hospitalization on children, the role of recreation/ play in a hospital setting, design of a play area, and working with children and families under stress.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 272 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 476 - Child Life Clinical Issues and Techniques


    This course is designed to provide an overview of clinical issues and practical techniques related to the delivery of child life services and the specialized needs of hospitalized children, adolescents, and their families.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 272 and 474 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
  •  

    SMRT 480 - Resort and Commercial Recreation


    This course is an overview of the unique and dynamic nature of the resort and commercial recreation industry. Historical development and planning, development, management, and marketing of the commercial recreation business will be the focus of the course. Technological changes, the diversity of lifestyles, and sociological needs are examined in relation to their impact on the industry.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 481 - Problem Solving


    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of higher order thinking processes associated with successful problem solving. Students visit major recreation enterprises and evaluate their operating systems. Emphasis is placed on the application of problem-solving methods in classroom and laboratory settings as they apply to these operating systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Undergraduates must receive permission from the instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 482 - Undergraduate Seminar in Sport and Recreation


    The undergraduate seminar is a capstone course in which students explore and develop strategies for utilizing Humanics to address current issues and trends in the field. The course will culminate in students’ presenting the major issues and trends in a public forum to professionals in the field.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior classification and within two semesters of graduation.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 485 - Undergraduate Internship


    This internship provides practice, under professional supervision, in a variety of recreation and leisure service agencies. Assignment of internship is based upon the student’s choice of professional career. Students complete 450-600 hours of internship work and complete all the projects required in the internship handbook.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    A minimum of 90 semester hours of coursework or permission of the internship supervisor and a minimum GPA of 2.50.

    Credits: 12 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 486 - Clinical Practicum in Child Life


    This course is designed to provide therapeutic recreation/child life students with opportunities for observing, assisting, and utilizing child life interventions in a clinical child life setting. This course is contracted under professional supervision and assists students in defining career options, as well as qualifying students for child life certification.

    Credits: 10 s.h
  
  •  

    SMRT 498 - Golf Course Management


    This course provides a detailed analysis of golf course operations and administration.  
    Topics include staffing, equipment, pro shop operations, landscape operations, tee and greens construction, computerized irrigation and global positioning systems.  Upon completion, students should be able to understand the complicated roles and        
    functions of golf course operations.  

    Credits: 3 s.h.

Youth Development

  
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    YDEV 101 - Introduction to Youth Development


    This course focuses on issues related to the process of youth development and the skills necessary to being an effective youth development specialist, including self-awareness, relationship building, and basic assessment and referral skills. It offers a basic introduction to the field of youth development, exploring its historical roots and contemporary innovations and manifestations.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    YDEV 340 - Youth in Society


    This course is designed to provide a critical comparative framework for interpreting the experiences and perceptions of youth in the United States. We consider the ways that society portrays youth, the effect of corporate culture on youth, the expression of youth identities through experiences like the prom, the internet, fashion, and music. We look at real people’s experiences within these contexts, and see how they operate as spaces for youth to internalize and confront social power relations reflected in age, social class, racial and ethnic, and gendered norms.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOCI 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    YDEV 388 - Special Topics in Youth Development


    This course is a comprehensive examination of a contemporary issue or social problem related to youth development and/or youth serving agencies.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    YDEV 486 - Supervised Internship in Youth Development


    This course is an individually contracted, practical experience under professional supervision in a youth serving agency. It is intended to assist the student in exploring and confirming career goals, as well as to apply theory and methods outside of the classroom. Students engage in 45 clock hours of supervised internship per semester hour of credit.

    Credits: 3-9 s.h
 

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