Feb 03, 2023  
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Physical Therapy

  
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    PHTH 685 - Clinical Education Experience II


    Clinical Education Experience II

    Credits: 6 s.h.
  
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    PHTH 686 - Clinical Education Experience III


    Clinical Education Experience III

    Credits: 6 s.h.
  
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    PHTH 687 - Clinical Education Experience IV


    Clinical Education Experience IV

    Credits: 2 s.h.

Physician Assistant

  
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    PAST 101 - PA Seminar I


    This is the first in a series of ten physician assistant seminar courses. This course examines the issues of provider-patient confidentiality, blood-borne pathogens, and concepts of illness and health as defined by the health-care provider and the patient. The relationships between health and culture, religion, ethnicity, and socio-economic status are discussed. The relationships between the above items and the Latino community are examined in detail.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Physician assistant major.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    PAST 102 - PA Seminar II


    This seminar course examines health promotion and disease prevention issues in the general and minority populations of America. The Greater Springfield area maternal-infant mortality rate, disease prevention, and childhood health concerns are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PAST 101.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    PAST 221 - PA Seminar III


    This course examines the “sick role” concept and the “medicalization” of society. The principles of health education-including the issues dealing with sexuality, patient motivation, and patient compliance-are presented. Each student designs and implements a community health project and formally reports his/her findings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PAST 102.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    PAST 222 - PA Seminar IV


    This course examines the cultural aspects involved in several health care problem areas. Health care for the homeless, Puerto Rican, Vietnamese, and Russian immigrants, substance abuse, and HIV infection/testing are presented in detail. During the last third of the semester, each student reports on his/her community project, which began in the fall semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PAST 221.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    PAST 340 - Ethical and Professional Issues in PA Practice


    This course is the introduction to ethical and professional issues that face the Physician Assistant in the practice of medicine.  It is designed to raise the students’ awareness of issues such as confidentiality, cultural differences, death and dying, ethical dilema, and provide a problem-solving approach to such issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Admission to Professional Phase.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PAST 522W - History Taking and Physical Assessment II


    History Taking and Physical Assessment II

    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
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    PAST 532W - History Taking and Physical Assessment III


    History Taking and Physical Assessment III

    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
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    PAST 540 - Ethical and Professional Issues in PA Practice


    This course is the introduction to ethical and professional issues that face the Physician Assistant in the practice of medicine.  It is designed to raise the students’ awareness of issues such as confidentiality, cultural differences, death and dying, ethical dilema, and provide a problem-solving approach to such issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Admission tp Professional Phase.

    Credits: 3 s.h

Physics

  
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    PHYS 205* - Physics for Movement Science


    This course is an introductory physics course that emphasizes those applications that are of importance to students aspiring toward a career in one of the areas of movement science. Special emphasis is placed on principles of body mechanics.

    General Education category natural science.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 115 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: Must also register for PHYS 206 or PHYS 207 lab.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    PHYS 206 - Sports Physics Laboratory


    Required lab for MOST majors registered for PHYS 205.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MOST Majors. Co-requisite: Must also register for MOSK 206 and PHYS 205.

    Credits: .5 s.h
  
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    PHYS 207 - Physics for Movement Science Laboratory


    Required lab for non-MOST majors registered for PHYS 205.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Non-MOST majors. Co-requisite: Must register for PHYS 205.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    PHYS 210* - General Physics I


    This course gives students an understanding of the subject matter, method, purposes, and philosophy of classical physics as an example of a physical science. The complementary nature of experiment and theory in the building of a science is emphasized.

    General Education category natural science.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 125 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4 s.h

  
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    PHYS 211* - General Physics II


    This course gives students an understanding of the subject matter, method, purposes, and philosophy of classical physics as an example of a physical science. The complementary nature of experiment and theory in the building of a science is emphasized.

    General Education category natural science.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MATH 125 and PHYS 210 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 4 s.h


Political Science

  
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    POSC 110* - Introduction to American Government


    This course is an overview of the major topics in the American governing systems. It examines the Constitution, the participants in American politics (voters, political parties, media, interest groups), the major institutions (Congress, Presidency, Supreme Courts), and the policy-making process.

    Fulfills social science General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    POSC 130 - Introduction into International Relations


    This course is a broad overview of the international system, including theory, the nation-state (1648-present), North and South relations, international law and organizations, and economics.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    POSC 210 - Public and Human Services Administration


    This course studies the executive branch of modern government as well as the general nature of bureaucracy in public and private organizations and in various cultural contexts. Its characteristics as a mechanism for decision making, with emphasis on the American experience, are stressed, with particular attention to problems of goal setting, innovation, and accountability.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    POSC 320 - Civil Liberties


    This is a study of the development of the concept and law of civil liberties in American society and of the problems involved in preserving and broadening these freedoms and maintaining security. Emphasis is on such topics as racial discrimination, freedom of speech and assembly, freedom of belief, the right of association, and equal protection of the laws.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    POSC 330 - State and Local Politics


    This course examines the principles and operations of state and local governments. Topics include policymaking, institutions, political participants and impacts of state and local government on public safety, economics, education, public health and community.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    POSC 340W - Public Policy


    This course studies the major issues facing American citizens today and explores ways to understand them. The analysis of public policy includes determining who is involved in the policy process, learning what the issues mean for citizens and the society, and studying the policy outcomes that result from government action or inaction.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    POSC 360 - Social Movement Organizations


    This course examines social movement organizations at two levels: Practical and theoretical. Students investigate the role of social movement organizations in American politics, how they form, why they succeed of fail, their impact on U.S. society, how they do their work, and how they obtain the resources they require for their operation.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    POSC 488 - Special Topics in Political Science


    This course is a comprehensive examination of a contemporary political problem or critical concern to society. The course dwells on the developmental roots and the contemporary controversy as well as the implications for the future.

    Credits: 3-4 s.h

Psychology

  
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    PSYC 101 - Introduction to Psychology


    The fundamentals of the scientific method used to study human behavior, such as maturation and development, perception, learning, and motivation, are explored and applied to such problems as failures in adjustment and conflict resolution. This course is a prerequisite for many other psychology courses.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 104 - Educational Psychology


    Students study the psychological foundations that relate to teaching and learning. Some of the topics dealt with include cognitive development, motivation, reinforcement theory, evaluation and measurement, social and intellectual development, and current theories of learning in the classroom setting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 107 - Career Planning for Life


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the developmental career planning process. Interactive exercises and presentations challenge students to clarify their values, discover their skills, and identify academic programs and occupations that are compatible with their interests and abilities. Career exploration instruments are used.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    PSYC 109 - Human Development


    This course provides students with an overview of the human life-cycle from birth through old age, showing the interplay of forces-organic, environmental, and self-directive-from stage to stage of development. Students examine concepts and criteria for developmental tasks, maturity, and self-actualization.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 135 - Personality and Personal Adjustment


    This course compares and contrasts the psychoanalytic, neopsychoanalytic, life span, humanistic, and behavioral approaches to personality adjustment and development.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 190 - Community Service Experience


    Community Service Experience

    Credits: 1-2 s.h
  
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    PSYC 209 - Social Psychology


    This course acquaints students with the principles and processes of social psychology. Topics to be covered include, but will not be limited to, attraction, aggression, prejudice, conformity, persuasion, and so forth. Upon completion of this course, students should have a basic understanding of how individuals think about, are influenced by and relate to one another.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 211W - Introduction to Statistics


    This course examines elementary statistics in behavioral research. Specific topics addressed are describing and comparing raw data, the concept of the curve as a basis for generalizing from samples to populations and tests of significance, procedures for obtaining correlation coefficients, and an introduction to regression analysis. Special attention is given to interpreting psychological research.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101 and a college-level course in mathematics. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 221 - Abnormal Psychology


    This is a systematic study of various patterns of abnormal behavior. Special emphasis is placed upon the investigation of the interplay of biological, psychological, and social forces that shape abnormal behavior and current methods of treatment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 250W - Childhood and Adolescent Development


    This course develops a fundamental understanding of the cognitive, affective and physical growth of children and the implications of these for curriculum planning. It includes a field experience in which students work closely with children in neighborhood schools. Students will mentor these children in specific areas of need, apply theories learned in class and reflect upon the application of theory on practice.

    May fulfill WAC requirement.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    PSYC 301W - Experimental Design


    This course focuses on the discussion of methods for conducting experiments in the social sciences such as one-group and two-group designs, quasi-experimental designs, etc. The use of various statistical procedures is integrated into the discussion. Critiques of past experiments are called for, as is the designing of personal experiments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101 and 211. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 305 - Sensation and Perception


    The five senses are scientifically and experimentally analyzed, with emphasis given to visual perception. A study of how information is gathered, coded, transmitted, and interpreted is conducted. The physiology, development, and functions of each sense are covered.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 320 - Health Psychology


    This course is a survey of psychological theory, research, and practice in the health domain. Didactic, interactive, and experiential methods are used to foster awareness and knowledge of the critical role of behavioral factors in health. Opportunities for application of behavioral principles to aspects of personal health are provided.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 330 - Applied Psychology


    This course provides students with a foundation for understanding the many areas of Human Relations in Business. The focus of the course is divided into three sections. 1) Keys to managing yourself, 2) Keys to working with others, and 3) Keys to leading and managing others. The course is anchored by a series of assessments to provide students with a greater understanding of their skill set(s) within these three areas.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 368 - Forensic Psychology


    This course examines the interaction between the fields of psychology and criminal justice. This course is designed to examine the many roles a psychologist might assume within the criminal justice system. This course is designed to cover several topics including eyewitness testimony, courtroom psychology, critical incident counseling, NGRI pleas and a variety of other interdisciplinary topic in order to provide students with a wealth and breath of information. Therefore, the goal of this course is to gain better understanding of the interaction between several disciplines that combine to create the field of Forensic Psychology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 370 - Introduction to Athletic Counseling


    This course introduces students to the field of athletic counseling. Students gain an understanding of several crucial issues involved in working with exercisers and athletes such as life skills programming, counseling diverse populations, ethics, and professional issues.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 386 - Supervised Experience in Psychology


    This is an opportunity for students to work, on an individual basis, with a faculty member in the psychology department. This contact can involve doing an extensive research project either on or off campus and/or actually working in a psychological setting applying the principles learned in the classroom. No more than 6 S.H. of PSYC 141 count toward the basic 30 S.H. of psychology required for the major.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    junior-senior standing.

    Credits: 2-10 s.h
  
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    PSYC 401 - Motivation and Learning


    This course examines the major theories and issues from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Emphasis is placed on the scientific experimental approach to understanding the nature of learning and motivation. Detailed analysis of classical and instrumental conditioning, reinforcement theory, and punishment, along with the contributions of Skinner, Hull, and Tolman, are a few of the areas investigated.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 405 - Physiological Psychology


    This course studies the physiological bases of a variety of behaviors. Scientific experimental analysis concerned with sensory processing, learning, motivation, and the development of the major schools and issues in perception are considered. The biological concomitants of various psychological abnormalities are analyzed.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    PSYC 406 - Psychology of Diversity


    This course examines the ways in which culture influences behavior and perception and is concerned with understanding psychological principals as either universal or culture specific. Standard areas of psychology including cognition, development, language acquisition, emotion, abnormal behavior, and social psychology, are explored from a cross-cultural perspective.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 407 - History of Modern Psychology


    This course explores the growth and development of psychology and whether or not it is a science, a philosophy, or a loosely-connected field of study. The great thinkers and various schools of thought that make up psychology are examined, with special emphasis on the political, social, and cultural climate that allowed for their origin and inevitable decline. Additionally, the history of psychology at Springfield College is elaborated on to show the contributions that the College has made.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    fifteen semester hours or permission of the instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 408 - Cognitive Psychology


    This course presents the basic concepts of cognitive psychology. Areas include psycholinguistics, cognition, and information processing. Other areas explored are memory, thought categorization, and neural networks. Current and future trends in the field are examined with special consideration of their application to problem-solving enterprises.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 413W - Psychological Testing


    This course aims to establish an understanding of the problems involved in the measurement of abilities, achievement, attitudes, interests, behavior, and personality. Methods of test construction and the concepts of reliability and validity are considered. Not to be taken by students in CPS.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    PSYC 415 - Child Development and Therapy


    This course examines the biological, psychological, and social development of children and adolescents. Child and adolescent disorders such as autism, psychosis, behavior disorders, and others are presented in terms of developmental functioning as well as developmental deviation.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 418 - Behavior Modification


    This course is designed to help students in psychology and other fields develop skills in identifying, assessing, and treating behavioral problems. At the end of the course students should be able to do the following: define behavioral theory, identify fundamental behavioral models, recognize major contributors to behavior theory, apply the techniques of behavior therapy, assess different behavioral problems, and generate appropriate treatment strategies for behavioral problems.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 422 - Interviewing and Counseling


    This course helps students in education, recreation, health fitness, and psychology develop helping and listening skills. It combines lecture and practical experience in order for students to gain a conceptual framework for the use of treatment methods in counseling.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 440 - Psychology of Sexual Behavior


    This course is designed to examine all forms of human sexual behavior, emphasizing attitudes and practical concerns such as interpersonal relationships, emotional involvements, and sexual difficulties, failures, and therapy.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 445 - Imagery, Hypnosis, and Self-Hypnosis


    This course examines the historical development, theories, techniques, and research in the application of imagery and hypnosis. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the utilization of these techniques as a tool in the human-helping professions. Topics covered include the mind/body relationship, healing and pain management, neurolinguistic programming, criminal investigation, sports skill enhancement, and ethical and legal considerations.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 460 - Rituals in Families


    This course provides an overview of the function of rituals as well as a model of assessment. Daily events such as tucking a toddler into bed, holiday celebrations, family traditions, and cultural/religious rites of passage are highlighted. The power of these rituals to create and shape reality, express values and emotions, facilitate transitions, and promote healing is demonstrated through lecture, the use of popular movies, and class participation.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 462 - Marital and Family Interaction


    This course examines the family in a life-cycle framework. The interaction patterns of individuals before marriage, in the marital dyad, and as members of a family are presented as valuable constructs for the understanding and treatment of the family unit.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 470 - Psychology of the College-Age Adult


    Encompassing ages 17 through 25, this course deals with psychological and social development in this critical period. Principal dimensions of and conditions influencing development are examined. Relevant research findings are related to the student’s current circumstances and stage of development.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    PSYC 482 - Coordinating Seminar


    In this course, students investigate selected topics within psychology and integrate findings and conclusions from various areas of the field as a whole.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101 and 24 semester hours of psychology.

    Credits: 3 s.h

Rehabilitation and Disability Studies

  
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    RHDS 126 - Principles of Rehabilitation


    This course is an introduction to the rehabilitation process of persons with disabilities, including history and background, related legislation, basic principles, and philosophy. Also considered are the steps in the rehabilitation process, historical attitudes toward persons with disabilities, the medical model, independent living programs, the nature of the helping process, and the range of professions in the field of rehabilitation.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 230* - Psychology of Disability


    The purpose of this course is to increase students’ knowledge of the psycho-social aspects of disability and to assist them in gaining an understanding of a wide variety of disabling conditions and individual adjustments in relation to disability.

    Fulfills social justice General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RHDS 240* - Independent Living Rehabilitation


    This course stresses a task analysis approach to rehabilitation instruction of individuals with impairments and multiple handicaps. Students are exposed to designs which are used to motivate, facilitate, support, and monitor the growth of individuals with disabilities toward the ultimate criterion of independent living.

    Fulfills social justice General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RHDS 290 - Career Exploration and Disability


    In this course, students are provided an introduction to issues of personal and career development. Personal values and their relationship to career decision-making are considered. Also investigated is the range of job-seeking skills, career-readiness training, and career-development theories. This is essentially an experiential course and requires active participation by the students.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 370 - Interviewing and Case Study Methods


    In this course, students are provided with both a familiarization and skill development of a variety of interviewing and case development techniques, the rationale behind them, and an evaluation of their applicability with respect to persons with different disabilities. This course is designed primarily as a prerequisite for rehabilitation fieldwork assignments with consumers who have handicaps and disabilities.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 378* - Introduction to Manual Communication/Issues of Deaf Culture


    Designed as an introduction to sign language, fingerspelling, and deaf culture, this course presents a brief history of American sign language and related systems. Students learn etiologies of hearing loss and develop an appreciation for an alternative culture as they develop beginning sign language skills.

    Fulfills General Education category second language/culture.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RHDS 379* - Manual Communication and Culture


    This course promotes advanced skill development in the use of visual/ gestural sign language for a clearer understanding of the rule structure of American sign language. The dynamics and cultural mores of deaf culture are further explored. Students attain mastery of syntax and pragmatics with manual/gestural language.

    Fulfills General Education category second language/culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 378 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RHDS 384W - Practicum in Rehabilitation Services


    This course is an individually contracted, practical experience under professional supervision in a rehabilitation setting. It is intended to assist the student in exploring and confirming career goals. Students engage in forty-five to fifty clock hours of supervised practicum per semester hour of credit.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Rehabilitation major and RHDS 290.

    Credits: 3-6 s.h

  
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    RHDS 386W - Rehabilitation Internship


    This course is an individually contracted work experience as a member of a rehabilitation team. It is intended to provide students with an opportunity to apply theory in the design, provision, and administration of client services. Supervision is provided in conjunction with qualified rehabilitation agency personnel.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 384 and departmental chairperson approval.

    Credits: 6-18 s.h

  
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    RHDS 402 - Implication of Disability for the Family


    The focus of this course is on understanding the world view of the parent, child, sibling, or spouse of a person with a disability. A family system approach is used in examining problems in readjustment to disability and the effectiveness of coping strategies. Students examine the goals of interventions, including support of the family unit and its individual members.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 420 - Rehabilitation Assessment and Appraisal Techniques


    In this course, students familiarize themselves with the range and variety of techniques used in assessing the personal and vocational rehabilitation potential and progress of consumers with disabilities. Various measurements of behavior, intelligence, aptitude, achievement, and personality are considered.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 426 - Vocational Evaluation, Assessment, and Report Writing


    Students acquire knowledge of the basic philosophies, practices, and processes of vocational evaluation and assessment as applied to various consumer populations in this course. Students gain understanding of specific instruments and clinical skills needed to provide meaningful and successful services.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 430 - Children with Disabilities


    In this course, students are provided with an understanding of the interdisciplinary primary-care and community-based services required for the practical management of children with physical disabilities, multiple-handicaps, and chronic illnesses from birth through childhood. Attention is given to the screening, diagnosis, and evaluation of the high-risk infant; behavioral and emotional implications of terminal illness; development of comprehensive early intervention treatment and educational plans; and support mechanisms that are helpful to families.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Rehabilitation major and RHDS 290.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 433 - The Deaf Community and Culture


    This course is an examination of two major aspects of deafness including the history of deaf people and the community and culture of deaf people. The history is a survey of people and events that have influenced persons who are deaf from earliest recorded history to the present. The concepts of community and culture in general and as they relate to the deaf community and deaf culture are examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    approval of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 439 - Understanding Deafness and Hearing Loss


    This course familiarizes the student with multiple aspects involved in the diagnosis, remediation, and acceptance of hearing loss. The course clearly differentiates the issues of hearing impaired from those of the deaf. Age of onset, familial history, enculturation, as well as specific scientific and academic issues are addressed in this course.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 442 - Behavioral Techniques for the Developmentally Disabled


    This course is an introduction to the principles of applied behavior analysis, with attention to effectiveness with developmentally disabled youths and adults. The case study approach provides guidelines for solving specific problems. Students design and implement behavior modification programs for various rehabilitation settings.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 450 - Action-Oriented Therapies


    This course provides an opportunity to examine, discuss, and experience several of the action-oriented therapies currently in use in many rehabilitation facilities serving physically disabled adults, exceptional children, and geriatric patients. Action-oriented therapies employ nonverbal modes of interacting including, games, drama, free play, movement, music, art, or other activities. Students explore these as therapeutic modalities in which many conflicts are resolved. Emphasis is on the use of these techniques to enhance intellectual and emotional functioning for more effective independent living and rehabilitation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 and PSYC 101 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 460 - Medical Information in Rehabilitation


    This course is a study of the more common and significant chronic diseases and disabling conditions. Emphasis is on the medical treatment component of rehabilitation. Attention is given to the basic terminology required to communicate effectively with medical personnel and to comprehend medical reports.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 464 - Rehabilitation of the Developmentally Disabled


    This course is an overview of the nature, needs, and approaches that are used in rehabilitation programs that serve persons with mental retardation, autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, TBI, and other central nervous system disorders. The course explores techniques used in various life stages and reviews innovative ways to overcome apathy and discrimination in community settings.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 469 - Behavioral Medicine Approaches to Chronic Disease and Disability


    This course is designed to present the spectrum of mind-body behavioral health techniques. Meditation, stress management, self-hypnosis, relaxation, biofeedback, and spirituality techniques are taught. Applications to disabling conditions involving both chronic disease and chronic pain are emphasized.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 470 - Rehabilitation Needs of the Aging


    Aging is associated in our society with a variety of special medical, social, and psychological needs. Students explore these needs, as well as available rehabilitation services and agencies. The focus is on keeping the aged individual in the community. There is a short field experience required for all students.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 471 - Therapeutic Approaches with the Aging


    This course familiarizes students with the variety of rehabilitative techniques available to help reverse debilitation and disorientation often associated with aging and to help maintain maximal functioning in the late years.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 470 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 475 - Integrated Medicine


    This course surveys the major health care traditions and selected complementary therapies. Emphasis is placed on the responsible integration of practices including Ayurveda, chiropractic, herbalism, massage, mind-body medicine, music therapy, Reiki, and yoga with conventional Western biomedicine options in the prevention, diagnosis, and healing of chronic disabling conditions.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 476 - Employee-Assistance Programming


    This course explores the knowledge, issues, and techniques of establishing, maintaining, and evaluating employee-assistance programs. Approaches to dealing with various worker problems, emotional and mental health, marital, family, financial, and other problems affecting attendance and productivity are considered. Organizational as well as therapeutic factors and their interrelationships are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 and PSYC 101 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 480 - Special Topics Workshop in Special Issues and Techniques in Rehabilitation


    This course provides an opportunity for an intensive examination, discussion, and skill development in a specialty area of rehabilitation services. Designated topical units may be selected from disability areas, rehabilitation techniques, or current professional issues. This course may be taken up to a maximum of 6 semester hours of credit.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 or equivalent.

    Credits: 2-3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 483 - Learning Disabilities


    This course examines theories of etiology and intervention models for remediation and compensation of learning disabilities. Emphasis is on those adolescents and adults whose learning disorders are chronic and may include other primary handicapping conditions.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 485 - Treatment Methods in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation


    This course is an introduction to the major issues in the field of alcohol and substance abuse rehabilitation, including etiology, models of recovery, and the biological and psychological consequences of substance abuse. Primary consideration is given to treatment issues; polyaddiction, specific detoxification methods; self-help programs; individual and group counseling; therapeutic community residencies; and family and other support groups.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 487 - Substance Abuse and Family Treatment


    This course is an introduction to the issues and techniques of treatment of the family affected by substance abuse or dependency. Central topics discussed in this course include: viewing the family as a client, diagnostic assessment techniques, and prescriptive treatment of the substance abuser or dependent client, extended family members and children. An emphasis is also placed on child development in unhealthy family systems.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 489 - Cardiac Rehabilitation


    This course familiarizes students with the fundamental principles and current practices of cardiac rehabilitation. The types and causes of disability in cardiac disease, as well as diagnostic evaluation techniques, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on a continuum of medical, surgical, psychosocial, and vocational management, from the acute recovery period to post-hospital rehabilitation.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 491 - Neurological Disabilities and Cognitive Rehabilitation


    This course is intended to familiarize students with the major issues in the field of neurological and cognitive rehabilitation. As the number of adolescents, young adults, and elderly who survive brain injury has increased, so has there been an increased demand for rehabilitation professionals with knowledge and skills in this area. The emphases of this course are on the causes, symptoms, and especially the treatment methods for neurological injury.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    RHDS 126 or equivalent.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 492 - Group Process in Rehabilitation


    This course presents an overview of the major counseling techniques used with rehabilitation clients in group situations. The integration of group counseling theory in specific rehabilitation settings is also emphasized. Active participation by all students is presumed.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    RHDS 494 - Mental Health Issues in Rehabilitation


    This course is an overview of major issues and treatment methods used in the rehabilitation of the psychiatric client. Primary emphasis is given to the range of counseling techniques, the use of psychoactive medication, and the inter-disciplinary nature of services within the community. Rehabilitation diagnosis techniques and vocational rehabilitation strategies are also discussed.

    Credits: 3 s.h

Religion

  
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    RELI 103* - Introduction to the Old Testament


    This course introduces students to the content of the Old Testament and, through a study of literary, historical, and theological issues, focuses on the Old Testament’s contribution to Western culture.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 104* - Religion in America


    This course is a study of religious thought and institutions and their influence on American culture. It focuses on major denominations and thinkers in this country, from the seventeenth century to the present.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 106* - Introduction to the New Testament


    This course introduces the students to the literature of the New Testament, noting the historical and theological dimensions of this literature as well as its significance for the modern world.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 109* - The Religious Experience of Humanity


    This course is an introduction to the major non-Western religious traditions of the world. These traditions are viewed in both their historical and contemporary settings and are assessed in terms of their contributions to the spiritual growth of humanity. Traditions studied include Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, and Islam.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 140* - Judaism


    This course is a survey of the history of the Jewish people and an analysis of the literature and institutions of Judaism, noting their contributions to contemporary life.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 205* - Religions of Ancient and Classical India


    This course is a religion-culture study of the Indian sub-continent, with special emphasis upon the emergence of the Hindu tradition and the development of non-Hindu systems in response to it.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 208* - Indian Buddhism and the Buddhist Tradition


    This course introduces the student to the history, philosophy, and culture of Buddhism. The critique of Brahmanical and non-Brahmanical systems, the life of the Buddha, the rise of the monastic institution, and the development of philosophical and meditational theories are presented. In addition, discussion focuses on the emergence of the Buddhist tradition in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, and China, as well as on the relationship of Buddhism to contemporary life.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 215* - Contemporary Catholicism


    This course focuses on the development of Catholicism from a broadly cultural perspective political, social, economic, artistic, philosophical, and theological. This course deals with the fundamental principles for the Catholic Christian adult in the twenty-first century. A review of pre-Vatican II theology and a sense of Catholicism in a post-Vatican II world are included.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 220* - Liberation Theology


    This course invites students to reflect primarily on the call to Christian non-violence. This call is studied through scripture, contemporary church documents, movements, and personalities. The special focus is on Central America, Latin America, Africa, and the Caribbean. Issues include poverty, rights, distributive justice, feminist movement, the Christian Base Community, and American presence in third world developing nations.

    Fulfills social justice General Education category, or religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 288* - Special Topics in Religion


    Responding to changing currents in the field of religion, this course explores a topic of contemporary relevance.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 422* - Christianity and Modern Society


    This course is a study of the ethical principles of Christianity as they relate to the social, political, and economic problems of the present day.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    RELI 424* - The Life and Teachings of Jesus


    This course is a social-historical examination of the record of Jesus’ life and thought, with attention to the present-day significance of his message.

    Fulfills religion General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

 

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