Dec 09, 2021  
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English

  
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    ENGL 302W - Business and Technical Writing


    This course includes instruction in various business writing situations, including letters, memos, reports, proposals, and job application materials. Students use their own area of study for developing suitable correspondence.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Completion of freshman English sequence.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 303 - Business and Professional Speaking


    Individuals learn rhetorical techniques for effective speaking in the workplace in the context of their respective future careers. Students are required to make several effective oral presentations, proposals, informative lectures or briefings, progress reports, summaries, evaluations, budget reviews, etc. Participation in mock interviews and staff meetings and proper use of visual aids and equipment to enhance presentations are stressed.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENGL 305W - Introduction to Writing as a Profession


    This course offers students a practical overview of writing as a career. Magazine writing is the main focus, but literary writing, technical writing, and other types of writing are also introduced.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 306*W - Advanced Creative Writing


    This advanced course is intended to develop students’ skills in one area of creative writing (i.e., fiction, poetry, or drama). Students are expected to submit several written assignments during the course of the term, to prepare detailed and close peer evaluations, and to submit a significant portfolio (several stories, ten to twelve poems) at the end of the semester.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category. May fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENGL 226.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 309W - Children’s Literature


    This course familiarizes students with a variety of classical and contemporary prose and poetry and its ability to enrich children’s lives by meeting their needs for beauty, fantasy, knowledge, and emotional support. Students draw on the power of story for making connections between learning and discovery. Writing activities for extending literature across the curriculum are included in each class session.

    May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 321* - Chaucer and the Middle Ages


    This course involves close study of selections from The Canterbury Tales, and “Troilus and Criseide,” as well as other representative selections from Middle English literature.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 325* - Survey of American Drama


    This course is a study of selected playwrights representing the development of American drama from the late nineteenth century through the present.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 332* - The Victorian Period


    This course is a study of selected authors of the period, including Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Rosseti, and Carlyle. The course will look at the social, political, and cultural trends of the period.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 333* - English Romantic Literature


    This course familiarizes the student with some of the finest poetry and prose written in early nineteenth century England.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 335 - Literacy, Hypermedia, and Modern Communication


    Students in this course explore the relationship of technology and communication, focusing on hypertext and hypermedia’s power to redefine literacy in the classroom and in the workplace. Students work toward a definition of literacy’s historical evolution from oral to pictoral and graphic to print, focusing on the noetic demands and impact of that evolution. With hands-on use of the technology, the course investigates the shift from paper-bound to electronic literacy, particularly as embodied in hypertext and hypermedia. Cross-listed as CISC 335.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENGL 343* - Film as a Narrative Art


    Narrative films such as On the Waterfront, All the King’s Men, and Requiem for a Heavyweight are studied and discussed in terms of character, theme, structure, and style. Similarities between cinematic technique and the adaptation of material from literature to film are explored.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 346* - American Short Story


    This course examines the historical significance and the artistic achievement of such writers as Hawthorne, F. O’Connor, Hemingway, Updike, Salinger, Carver, and those writers in the most recent edition of Best American Short Stories. Its objective is to help students become better readers of short fiction by emphasizing class discussion and short papers.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 349*W - Modern American Poetry


    This course is a survey from Dickinson to such poets as Frost, Stevens, Wilbur, and Silko. Modern poetic forms, diction, and content are emphasized. The course reflects the diversity of modern American poetry and its relevance to contemporary literary movements.

    Fulfills General Education category literature. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 350* - Modern American Novel


    This course examines novels by selected twentieth century American writers such as Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Anderson, Hemingway, Wolfe, dos Passos, West, Faulkner, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Oates, Updike, Bellow, Pynchon, and others.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 352* - American Realism and Naturalism


    This course focuses on the literary genre, criticism, and cultural context of America from 1865 to 1914. The course includes a study of the works of the following writers:Howells, Whitman, Twain, James, Harte, Garland, London, Norris, and Crane.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 353* - American Romanticism


    This course focuses on the literary works of key nineteenth century authors in the American Romantic movement: Irving, Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman. Romantic themes of individualism, imagination, and intuition are stressed.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 356* - Readings in the English Novel I


    This course traces the rise and development of the English novel from the early eighteenth century until the mid-nineteenth century. Included in this examination are the evolution of narrative voice and structure, point of view, theme, and ideology.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 357* - Readings in the English Novel II


    This course traces the development of the English novel from the mid-Victorian period through the middle of the twentieth century, focusing particularly on the modernist and postmodernist movements and their influence on narrative voice, point of view, structure, theme, and ideology. Authors included are Eliot, Gissing, Hardy, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Burgess, Sillitoe, and Golding.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 362* - Celtic Literature


    This course explores modern and contemporary Irish, Welsh, and Scottish literary traditions, with attention to the mythological and political backgrounds of the literature. Particular emphasis is given to the Irish Literary Renaissance and such writers as Yeats, J.M. Synge, James Joyce, Flann O’Brien, and Frank O’Conner.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 375 - Structure of American English


    This course is an introduction to the methods of descriptive analysis of contemporary American English (sounds, forms, and syntax), with special emphasis on language learning and social dialects.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENGL 377 - The History of the English Language


    This course analyzes the growth, structure, and development of the English language.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENGL 388* - Special Topics in Narrative Film


    Each semester it is offered, this course focuses on a specific film genre such as the war film, film comedy, or the western. Films are analyzed in terms of character, theme symbol, structure, and unique cinematic techniques. It is suggested, but not required, that students take ENGL 343 Film as a Narrative Art, prior to 388. This course may be taken for credit more than one time if different genre topics are selected.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 428* - Modern Drama


    This course explores modern trends in the development of dramatic literature, with emphasis on Realism and Theatricalism.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 459* - The Contemporary Novel


    This course seeks to investigate the novel from the point where traditional courses in American and European literature terminate. Current novels are read and discussed in an effort to evaluate their literary merit, popularity, and contribution to modern culture.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 467* - Shakespeare


    This course develops the student’s appreciation of Shakespeare as a master dramatist through a study of selected tragedies, comedies, and histories. The emphasis shifts yearly from the tragedies to the comedies, with histories incorporated each year.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 482* - Seminar


    Selected topics in British or American literature are assigned. The subject of the seminar may vary from year to year.

    Fulfills General Education category literature.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ENGL 488 - Special Topics


    Varies.

    Credits: 3 s.h

English for Speakers of Other Languages

  
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    ESOL 110 - English for Speakers of Other Languages- Beginning


    This is a low-to-intermediate ESOL course designed for students whose native language is not English. It provides the beginning to low-intermediate ESOL student with a solid foundation in all four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students should be placed in ESOL 110 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Fall only)

    Credits: 6 s.h
  
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    ESOL 115/116 - Conversation I and II


    This course is designed to improve the oral/aural communication of students whose native language is not English and who are at the beginning or intermediate level of ESOL.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ESOL 120 - English for Speakers of Other Languages- Beginning


    This is a low-to-intermediate ESOL course designed for students whose native language is not English. It provides the beginning to low-intermediate ESOL student with a solid foundation in all four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students should be placed in ESOL 120 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Spring only)

    Credits: 6 s.h
  
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    ESOL 130 - English for Speakers of Other Languages- Intermediate


    This is an intermediate ESOL course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing ESOL students’ communicative skills to enable them to function with adequate proficiency in an academic setting. The skills taught include: listening, speaking reading, and writing. Students should be placed in ESOL 130 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Fall only)

    Credits: 6 s.h
  
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    ESOL 135 - American Culture


    This course provides an introduction to American Culture for students in the IELI program. Topics covered include education, society, religion, politics, manners, work, and family. (Fall only)

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ESOL 136 - American Film


    This course introduces students in the IELI program to American culture through the medium of film. (Spring only)

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ESOL 140 - English for Speakers of Other Languages- Intermediate


    This is an intermediate ESOL course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing ESOL students’ communicative skills to enable them to function with adequate proficiency in an academic setting. The skills taught include: listening, speaking reading, and writing. Students should be placed in ESOL 140 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Spring only)

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ESOL 250* - ESOL Reading and Writing I-Advanced


    This is an advanced level reading a writing course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing reading and writing skills to enable them to function effectively in an academic setting. Students should be placed in ESOL 250 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Fall only) .

    Fulfills General Education category Second Language/Culture

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ESOL 251 - ESOL Speaking and Listening-Advanced


    This is an advanced speaking and listening course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing the speaking and listening skills to enable them to function effectively in an academic setting. Students should be placed in ESOL 251 through the placement exam or with the recommendtion of an ESOL instructor. (Fall only)

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ESOL 260* - ESOL Reading and Writing II-Advanced


    This is an advanced level reading a writing course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing reading and writing skills to enable them to function effectively in an academic setting. Students should be placed in ESOL 260 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Spring only)

    Fulfills General Education category Second Language/Culture.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ESOL 261 - ESOL Speaking and Listening-Advanced


    This is an advanced speaking and listening course designed for students whose native language is not English. It focuses on developing the speaking and listening skills to enable them to function effectively in an academic setting. Students should be placed in ESOL 251 through the placement exam or with the recommendation of an ESOL instructor. (Spring only)

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ESOL 288 - Special Topics


    Three special topics courses are offered each semester. Topics may include TOEFL preparation, study skills, vocabulary development, pronunciation, or advanced grammar topics.

    Credits: 1 s.h

Environmental Science

  
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    ENSC 210 - Hazardous Waste Site Operations-Health and Safety


    This course provides a mandatory minimum forty-hour training certification, in accordance with OSHA Title 29 CFR 1910.210 for workers performing technical and support operational activities at hazardous waste sites subject to investigation for site characterization and implementation of various remedial technologies. Instruction emphasizes standard health and safety practices and hazardous material methodology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENSC 220 - Environmental Laws and Regulations


    This course provides instruction on the major statutes, regulations, and policies passed by Congress and promulgated by the USEPA and OSHA. Course instruction presents a discussion of environmental laws regulating pollution-causing activities to the air, waterways, drinking water, and groundwater through enforcement and the permitting process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENSC 310.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENSC 310 - Advanced Environmental Studies I


    Students undertake an in-depth study of the specific areas of water and wastewater treatment (ENSC 310), hydrology, and land use planning (ENSC 311) as they relate to environmental impact. Special emphasis is placed upon EPA/SCS/USGS methodologies currently employed in the fields of water, wastewater, hydrologic and land planning, and resource evaluation. Courses may be taken individually.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121-123, 122-124 and CHEM 121-123, 122-124.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENSC 311 - Advanced Environmental Studies II


    Continuation of ENSC 310.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENSC 310

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ENSC 386 - Field Experience/Practicum in Environmental Studies


    This course offers an off-campus exposure to dealing with environmental issues, including causes, control, and detection of pollution. Students obtain firsthand experience in technical and administrative skills through exposure to day-to-day activities of state and federal agencies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Credits: 2-6 s.h
  
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    ENSC 482 - Seminar in Environmental Studies


    This course is an informal session in which students, faculty, and professionals in the various fields of environmental study are brought together for mutual discussion of selected topics of environmental interest. Emphasis is placed upon research and administrative procedural reviews of air, water, noise, floral, faunal, and land use impacts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    None

    Credits: 2 s.h

French

  
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    FREN 103*W - The Culture of France and Francophone World


    This course presents selected aspects of French culture through readings, and especially through the viewing of films. In the fall semester, the course emphasizes the French way of life, and in the spring, French history. The aim is for students to visualize a culture before examining it. Students discuss selected topics pertinent to the French civilization that are also relevant to them. In addition, students acquaint themselves with French-speaking countries by embarking on an intellectual voyage through discussions of each movie and each literary work, through individual research, and oral presentation.

    The course fulfills General Education category for second language/culture but not the requirement for a B.A. degree.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    FREN 111* - Elementary French I


    This course is offered to students with no experience of the French language. Students are immersed in all the complexity of spoken French and are brought to speak with confidence and good pronunciation in familiar situations. By means of this immersion method, students use their creativity and coping skills to communicate and to reflect on the differing values in a foreign culture. To satisfy the requirements of a B.A. degree, students must complete six credits at the intermediate level.

    Fulfills General Education category for second language/culture.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    FREN 112* - Elementary French II


    This course is for students with some experience of the French language. As in French 111, students are immersed in French by means of global media. Conversation skills are stressed. Students use their creativity and coping skills to communicate. They also study selected aspects of French culture and develop awareness of the differing values in another culture.

    Fulfills General Education category for second/language culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    French 111 or 2 years of French at the Secondary school level. Fulfills General Education category for second language/culture.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    FREN 211* - Intermediate French I


    This course focuses on the practical and contemporary aspects of the French language by means of technology and multimedia, thus reinforcing the socio-cultural frameworks of language. Conversation skills are emphasized while students surf the net, watch movies, read poetry, sing songs, prepare French recipes, and make phone calls.

    Fulfills General Education category for second/language culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    French 112, or 3-4 years of French at the Secondary School Level.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    FREN 212* - Intermediate French II


    This course emphasizes the advantages of learning a foreign language as a means of communication and as the key to a different culture. Students gain a better understanding of how the French Language works in real life. The conversational method of the course stresses both verbal and non-verbal communication, gestures, looks, attitudes, behavior, intonation, i.e., cultural conventions and assumptions. Toward this goal, multimedia and global communication capacities through technology are used to expose students to French in its natural form.

    Fulfills Second Language General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    French 112 with a B+ average, French 211 or 4 years of French at the Secondary School Level.

    Credits: 3 s.h


Geography

  
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    GEOG 200* - Concepts of Geography


    This is a basic introductory course organized to develop a knowledge and appreciation of the nature of geography, including a study of the earth and its features and its effects on human activity.

    Fulfills social science General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    GEOG 210* - Cultural Geography


    This course examines the cultural factors that condition the way different peoples-ethnic groups of the world-perceive, organize, and use their habitats and how these factors affect the relation of each group with others.

    Fulfills social science General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h


German

  
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    GERM 103* - German Culture and Language


    This course, open to all undergraduates, provides a fundamental understanding not only of the German language, but also of the many people of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland for whom it is the major form of communication.

    Fulfills the General Education category second language requirement, but not the requirement for a B.A. degree.

    Credits: 3 s.h


Health Studies

  
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    HLTH 103* - Personal Health


    This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of current personal health concepts and applications such as health and wellness, stress management, nutrition, substance use and abuse, and human sexuality. Emphasis is on decision-making skills and self-responsibility for one’s own wellness.

    Fulfills General Education category health requirement.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    HLTH 106 - First Aid Responding to Emergencies and Community CPR


    This course is designed to prepare the student to make appropriate decisions regarding first aid care and to act on those decisions in an emergency situation before medical help arrives. Successful completion provides the student with American Red Cross Certification in First Aid: Responding to Emergencies and Community (adult, child, and infant) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    HLTH 210 - Consumer Health Education


    This course aids prospective health education majors, as well as interested student consumers, in attaining a better understanding of individual human rights in consumer health from conception until death and in realizing a maximum return for their money and effort spent in the pursuit of optimal wellness.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 230 - Public Health Administration


    This course acquaints the student with organization, administration, and management of public health programs. Discussion focuses on the political, social, cultural, and economic factors that determine current policies and practices.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    HLTH 260 - Drugs and Society


    This course provides students with a basic knowledge of current drug use and the adverse effects of drug misuse and abuse. The use and misuse of drugs are examined from physiological, psychological, sociological, and intellectual perspectives. This course provides students with an opportunity to examine the various components and issues of drug use, misuse, and abuse in society today.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HLTH 103.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 261 - Introduction to Nutrition


    In this course students will discover how the body uses food by learning various functions of each key nutrient. An overview of digestion, absorption, and metabolism is provided. Food sources of the key nutrients and recommended intakes are explored in depth. The student’s own diet is evaluated, using a computerized diet analysis.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 304W - Methods and Materials in Health/Family and Consumer Science


    Students in this class analyze the theory, practice, and planning process for school health education. The readings, discussions, observations, lesson planning, practice teaching, unit planning, and critical analysis emphasize quality interactive teaching and professionalism in health education.

    May fulfill WAC requirement.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    HLTH 343 - Community Health Education


    This course helps students become effective community health educators by increasing knowledge in community health areas and enhancing individual health skills and competencies essential to this career field. This course also provides an overview of the organization, role, and structure of community health agencies, with a specific emphasis on the health education services.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 355 - Human Sexuality


    This course provides open discussion, debates, and reading materials to survey the dynamics of human sexuality, and to identify and examine the basic issues in human sexuality in relation to society as a whole.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 361 - Applied Nutrition


    This course enables students to attain a better understanding of the dynamic relationship between nutrition and the human physiological process. This better prepares students to engage in preventive and management techniques as related to nutritional deficiencies and the human body.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HLTH 261.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 386 - Pre-Practicum in Health/Family and Consumer Science PreK-8


    This is a supervised pre-practicum in grades PreK-8 of a public school that includes      
    observatiuon and participation in the work of the school.  This course provides the student with exposure to various teaching methods and learning experiences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.

    Credits: 1-2 s.h
  
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    HLTH 387 - Pre-Practicum in Health/Family and Consumer Science 5-12


    This is a supervised pre-practicum in grades 5-12 of a public school that includes        
    observation and participation in the work of the school.  This course provides the student with exposure to various teaching methods and learning experiences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Student must be an official candidate for teacher licensure.

    Credits: 1-2 s.h
  
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    HLTH 405 - Curriculum Construction and Instruction


    This course analyzes the essential components of and procedures for the development of a written PreK-12 comprehensive health education curriculum. Students critically review current general and specific curricula in light of the various teaching possibilities and environments for health education.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 417W - Organization, Administration, and Assessment for the School Health Program


    This course examines administrative relationships, procedures, and assessment techniques involved in the conduct of school health programs. Areas of study include: general policies, services and delivery systems, environment, reliability, personnel duties, curriculum development, and instruction. An emphasis on aligning program objectives and assessment strategies with the current Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Education Frameworks (MCHEF) will comprise a significant segment of required assignments.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 425 - Human Disease


    This course examines a wide range of contemporary health problems. Students examine the epidemiology and pathology of major diseases and the attendant psychosocial implications. The prevention and control are discussed within the ethical issues identified for study.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 101, 130-131, HLTH 103, PSYC 101, or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 450 - Workshop in Health


    This workshop provides students with an understanding of the contemporary health problems of society. Provisions are made for students to seek solutions to these health problems through individual and group work. NOTE: A student may register for this course for credit more than once, provided the area to be included is different each time.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    HLTH 460 - Health-Related Aspects of Aging


    This course focuses on the various theories associated with biological aging, the identification of major health hazards, and provisions for their treatment, prevention, and control. Also, the health care delivery system is examined and discussed.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 461 - Advanced Nutrition


    This course focuses on the functions of nutrients in human metabolism. Emphasis is placed on digestion, absorption, and metabolism of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, and the non-energy nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and water. Evaluation of nutritional status is also examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHEM 121-122, 123-124, 211, 331, BIOL 130-131, 132-133, or BIOL 250-251, 252-253, and HLTH 261.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 480 - Program Planning and Design


    This course provides an overview of assessment, planning, implementing, and evaluating effective community health education programs. Students will develop their abilities in setting goals and objectives, coordinating provision of health education services and communicating health education needs, concerns, and resources.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HLTH 484 - Practicum in Health/Family and Consumer Science-Grades PreK-8


    This is a supervised practicum under the direct guidance of a teacher-certified   
    health educator for a minimum of seven weeks at the PreK-8 level. Site assignments are made in consultation with and by permission of the Office of Educator Preparation.  This course is for students seeking health/family & consumer science licensure at the elementary level.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Health studies major, matriculation, permission of the department, and the following courses HLTH 304, 386 or 387, 417, and EDUC 237. Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.

    Credits: 7 s.h
  
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    HLTH 485 - Practicum in Health/Family and Consumer Science-Grades 5-12


    This is a supervised practicum under the direct guidance of a teacher-certified   
    health educator for a minimum of seven weeks at the 5-12 level.  Site assignments are made in consultation with and by permission of the Office of Educator Preparation.  This course is for students seeking health/family & consumer science licensure at the secondary level.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Health studies major, matriculation, permission of the department, and the following courses HLTH 304, 386 or 387, 417, and EDUC 237. Student must have passed MTEL exams and courses designated by their program.

    Credits: 7 s.h
  
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    HLTH 486 - Field Work in Community Health Education


    This is a supervised experience in a health agency for a full semester. It includes observation of and participation in the work of the agency.

    Credits: 15 s.h
  
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    HLTH 487 - Fieldwork in Health Studies


    Fieldwork in Health Studies.

    Credits: 6 s.h.
  
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    HLTH 488 - Special Health Topics for the Classroom Professional Grades PreK-12


    This course gives prospective classroom professionals an opportunity to study the special health issues and problems that arise in assisting students to change lifestyles or cope with special health needs. Through this course, students are better able to apply the communication and interpersonal skills necessary for promoting health and wellness.

    Credits: 3 s.h

Health, Physical Education and Recreation

  
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    HPER 475 - Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation


    This course offers an examination of general legal concepts, federal and state legislation, and legal liabilities as they impact the recreation and the sports profession. It is designed to assist administrators and supervisors to anticipate and cope with potential litigation.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HPER 478 - Budgeting for Sport and Recreation


    This course focuses on the nature and concerns of sport and recreation professionals as they prepare and defend operating and capital budgets. Topics will include the preparation of financial plans, strategic budgeting, organizational structure, collaborative efforts, and other methods used to fund and support facility operations.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HPER 479 - Personnel and Human Resources Management


    This course examines the responsibilities of personnel managers who perform personnel functions. Course content includes work analysis, staffing, training and development, appraisal, compensation, maintenance, union relations, communication, motivation, and legislation. Contemporary topics covered include employee recognition, employee-assistance programs, burnout, and sexual harassment.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    SMRT 476 - Child Life Clinical Issues and Techniques


    This course is designed to provide an overview of clinical issues and practical techniques related to the delivery of child life services and the specialized needs of hospitalized children, adolescents, and their families.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SMRT 272 and 474 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h

History

  
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    HIST 101* - Survey of the History of Western Civilization


    This course examines the evolution of civilization from prehistoric culture through the ancient world to the seventeenth century. Emphasis is given to a global perspective, interrelationships between major world cultures, and the forces of change in political, economic, social, and intellectual institutions.

    Fulfills history General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    HIST 102* - The Making of the Modern World


    This course surveys the development of ideas, institutions, and social processes in the modern world from the seventeenth century to the present. Consideration is given to both Western tradition and the diversity and interrelationships between the various cultures that comprise our contemporary world. .

    Fulfills history General Education category

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    HIST 103* - World History


    This course deals with the major developments and encounters of world civilizations from antiuity to the present. The aim is to develop a deeper understanding of the forces for change and patterns of continuity throughout history in order to better understand our global, yet diverse, world today.

    Fulfills history General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    HIST 105* - Colonial America to the Civil War


    This is a survey of America’s history from the period of earliest explorations to the Civil War. Colonial settlement, the nature of the Revolution and U.S. Constitution, western settlement, and slavery are among the many areas covered.

    Fulfills social justice General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    HIST 106* - The Civil War to Modern America


    This is a survey of America’s history from the Civil War period to the present. The impact of industrialization, America’s emergence as a world power, the New Deal, and more recent cultural, social, political, and economic trends are emphasized.

    Fulfills social science General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    HIST 210* - African American History


    This survey of Afro-American history includes the following topics the Atlantic slave trade, pre-Civil War conditions, lives and contributions of enslaved and free people, Civil War and Reconstruction doubts and hopes, post-Reconstruction struggles between Euro- and Afro-Americans through the 1950’s, and the Civil Rights activism of the 1960’s and early 1970’s.

    Fulfills social justice General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    HIST 215 - Modernization and European Society


    This course deals with the complex pattern of social, economic, political, and psychological changes that accompany the transformation of traditional agrarian societies into modern industrial ones. This course investigates this still-continuing transformation of Western European society from the eighteenth century and examines how leading thinkers and the masses have responded to modernity.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 223 - History of Russia


    This course begins with a brief survey of Russian history from the earliest time through the nineteenth century. It concentrates on the reforms, revolutionary movements, and the decline of imperial Russia, and concludes with an overview of the Soviet period.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 325 - The Ancient and Classical World


    This is a survey of the political, social, and economic history of the Near Eastern, Mediterranean, and Western European world between 4000 B.C. and 500 A.D. The contributions of the major religious traditions and the Grecian and Roman cultures to modern civilizations are emphasized.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 326 - Medieval History


    This course examines developments and achievements of European civilizations from 350 to 1500 A.D. The division and decline of the Roman Empire, Byzantine reorganization and expansion, feudalism, urbanization, the social role of the Christian Church in Eastern and Western Europe, the universities, new art forms, the birth of national states, and the transition to modern history are emphasized.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 327 - Early Modern Europe


    This course begins with a consideration of Renaissance and Reformation of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries as the harbinger of the modern age. It analyzes the evolution of modern science, Baroque and the Enlightenment, and concludes with a study of the background to the French Revolution.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 335 - Modern China


    China’s transformation between the Opium War (1839-1842) and the 1990’s may be seen as a progressive adjustment to the modern world or as an ever-intensifying revolution in Chinese government, society, and culture. This course combines the two approaches, exploring the problem of modernizing and revolutionary China through the eyes of participants and the debates of historians.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 360 - Early American Thought and Culture


    This course is a study of American ideas and culture from the Colonial Period to the mid-nineteenth century. Particular attention is given to such areas as social and political thought, religion, philosophy, literature, science, education, and reform.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 361 - Modern American Thought and Culture


    This is a study of American ideas and culture from the early nineteenth century to the early twentieth century. Particular attention is given to such areas as social and political thought, religion, philosophy, literature, science, and education.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 365 - Environmental History of America


    This course examines American attitudes toward nature, space, land, and resources from the earliest settlements to the present. The history of public land policy, the conservation movement, federal and state policies, and environmental concern are traced.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 388W - Studies in History


    This course deals with one or more of the great issues that have shaped the history of civilization. It is designed to recognize, discuss, and analyze controversial issues and problems, with particular attention to how man dealt with them. Issues may be selected from any period of the Eastern or Western worlds.

    Selected courses may fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3-4 s.h

  
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    HIST 405 - The History of the Soviet Union


    This is an analysis of Communist theory and interpretations of Soviet practice in selected areas of political, social, and cultural life since the Revolution in 1917. Areas of attention include education and social sciences, the natural and physical sciences, religion, the arts, economic agencies and institutions, agencies of social control, and the USSR’s relations with other nations of the world. Not offered every year.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    HIST 441 - Supervised Experience in History


    This course gives students a fieldwork opportunity under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. Students do extensive research off campus and participate in learning experiences in local, state, or national settings.

    Credits: 3-15 s.h
  
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    HIST 450 - Europe Since 1900


    This is an examination of the political, social, and economic development of major European nations from the prelude to World War I to the present, with special emphasis on the causes and results of the two catastrophic wars and the efforts towards the creation of a world collective security system.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

    Credits: 3 s.h
 

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