Dec 09, 2021  
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2004-2005 Springfield College Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 250* - Cultural Anthropology


    This course is an in-depth examination of the concept, methods, and theoretical positions of cultural anthropology. Students concentrate on reading primary materials - i.e., case studies of ethnographies, key articles, or selections in theory and method.

    Fulfills social science General Education category.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

    Credits: 3 s.h


Applied Exercise Science

  
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    AEXS 101 - Introduction to Applied Exercise Science


    This introductory course in Applied Exercise Science is designed for Applied Exercise Science majors. This course provides an overview to the field of applied exercise science. The student will gain exposure to various career options and the settings for professional practice. Introduction to the curriculum, policies and procedures for the major will be provided.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    AEXS 230 - Instruction and Presentation Techniques


    This course is designed to acquaint students with the concepts of various types of instructional and presentation techniques common to the health/fitness field.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    AEXS 260 - Exercise Testing and Prescription


    This course covers basic concepts involved in exercise resting and prescription (for the healthy adult), as outlined by the American College of Sports Medicine. Students are required to administer a battery of fitness test to assess each component of health-related physical fitness. Laboratory assignments are designed to provide hands-on experience for students.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MSCI 313.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    AEXS 284 - On-Campus Practicum


    This course represents the first in a sequence of practica experiences. Students are afforded the opportunity to observe and, to a limited extent, develop techniques, methodologies, and philosophies of teaching exercise under the direct supervision of Springfield College faculty members.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    AEXS 335 - Measurement and Evaluation


    This course is an introduction to the methods of measurement and evaluation in the health/fitness field. Emphasis is placed on choosing appropriate tests, calculation and interpretation of basic statistics, and practical application of measurement principles. Topics include basic research methodology, statistical tools in evaluation, reliability and validity, calibration of equipment, test administration, and evaluation of fitness tests.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    A college-level math course or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    AEXS 350 - Pre-Practicum in Health/Fitness


    This pre-practicum provides prospective health/fitness leaders with an opportunity to learn through assisting an experienced leader in health/fitness programs in clinical, agency, corporate, or institutional environments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MSCI 313, AEXS 260, matriculation, and PEPC 100 or PEAC 100.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    AEXS 365 - Exercise Testing and Prescription for Special Populations


    This course is designed to acquaint students with the principles of exercise testing and prescription for special populations. Selection and organization of activities for a range of ages and fitness levels are covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AEXS 260 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    AEXS 377 - Stress Management


    This course provides an overview of principles and practices in stress management. The concept of stress, the psychophysiology of stress, the measurement of stress, the relation of stress to mental/physical health and performance, prevention and intervention in stress management, and special topics related to stress are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 130 and 131.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    AEXS 401W - Management of Health/Fitness Programs


    This course gives students the basic skills necessary to develop and implement an employee health/fitness program. Emphasis is placed on management, facility development, programming, and leadership procedures.

    Can fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior status in applied exercise science (99 S.H.) and/or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    AEXS 461 - Electrocardiogram Interpretation and Graded Exercise Testing


    This course is designed to instruct students in the acquisition and interpretation of both resting and exercise electrocardiograms. Students are taught to identify various cardiac dysrythmias and to administer a graded exercise test according to the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AEXS 260 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    AEXS 470 - Strength and Conditioning


    This course is designed to provide students with information for the design and implementation of a successful strength and conditioning program. Emphasis will be placed on assessment, description and analysis of sport movement, and designing weight training programs to enhance performance variables. This course will assist those students who desire to take the National Strength and Conditioning Association’s Certified Strength and Conditioning (CSCS) Exam. However, this course is not a preparation course for the exam.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    AEXS 471 - Strength and Conditioning Applications


    This course provides students with the appropriate setting in which to apply the principles of strength and conditioning that are taught in the AEXS 270 course. Emphasis is placed on assessment of athletic performance as well as the development of musculoskeletal flexibility, speed, agility, quickness, strength, and power.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AEXS 470.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    AEXS 486 - Health/Fitness Fieldwork


    This is a supervised, field-based experience that familiarizes students with the conditions, practices, and environmental settings where the aspired vocational roles are conducted. Placement for field experience is made and must be approved by the coordinator for health/fitness fieldwork. Information contained in the fieldwork application filed during the junior year is utilized in making specific assignments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior status (99 S.H.), matriculation, AEXS 350 and 260.

    Credits: 10-15 s.h

Art

  
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    ARTS 101* - Materials and Techniques


    This course gives students experience in a variety of materials- metal, ceramics, woods, and cloth. Each medium is developed as a unique form of creative expression.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 102*W - Arts and Ideas


    This course is designed to combine the elements of art with art history. Through the study of the plastic elements of art and composition, students view the role of the artist from ancient times to the present day to form a better understanding of the aesthetics of our own human nature.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h.

  
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    ARTS 103* - Studio in Computer Graphics


    This is an introductory course that focuses on the technology of computer graphics. Each student has the opportunity to explore a number of graphic software programs, utilizing several computer systems. With the software programs employed, students are able to draw, paint, design, and create web pages of almost unlimited possibilities. No previous computer experience is necessary. A strong sense of design and drawing ability are keys for success in this course.Cross-listed with CISC 103.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 104* - Sensitivity and the Creative Process


    This course explores the creative processes of artists in the visual arts. Examples of work by the leaders of contemporary art, as well as artists of historical significance are analyzed. Slides, tapes, films, museum visits, and guest artists provide an integral part of the course. Through this examination of art, students have the opportunity to develop an aesthetic sensitivity that can be applied to creating more meaningful and significant artistic statements of their own.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 2 s.h

  
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    ARTS 105* - Studio in Printmaking


    This course explores the varied aspects of the printmaking media. Areas covered are intaglio, calligraphy, and lithography. Work is done using both traditional and experimental techniques in black and white and in color. Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 108* - Studio in Drawing


    This course sets out to increase the student’s ability to draw realistically. Drawings are treated as an independent medium rather than a sketch exercise or studies for other materials.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 111* - Studio in Design


    This is an exploration of design as a visual language as it exists on a flat surface. Students are guided toward the understanding of the basic design elements as a means to maximize the freedom of expression in the area of communication and originality.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 116* - Studio in Painting


    This is a course in which the many aspects of making a painting are explored. Various painting problems are assigned in order to focus on the capacity of painting for control and scope of expression. Students are encouraged to develop and realize their personal ideas as exciting visual images.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 120*W - Contemporary Art


    This course provides a survey of contemporary art from early in the Twentieth Century until the present. Illustrated by slides and other visual materials, the lectures and discussions, focus on the Modern and Post Modern Art of the Western World and also includes Art from non-Western societies. The course focuses on painting, sculpture and photography as well as art using new materials and multi-media techniques.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 190 - Community Service Experience


    Community Service Experience

    Licensure students take this course for 3 s.h.

    Credits: 2 s.h.

  
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    ARTS 202 - Computer Animation


    This course provides the student with an in-depth study of the creation of computer animation. Each student has the opportunity to develop animated pieces from initial conception to final animation, and then developing it for the web. Students use a variety of two-dimensional software and develop skills in story boarding and interactivity.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ARTS 103 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with CISC 202.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ARTS 203 - Advanced Desktop Design


    This course provides students with the skills to compete in today’s graphic job market. Layout, design, and photo manipulation are taught using industry standard programs with an overview of other currently used vector programs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ARTS 103 or COMM 207.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ARTS 210* - Figure Drawing


    This course is an in-depth study of the traditional problems of drawing the figure, working with light, weight, dimension, and color. Emphasis is placed on developing the student’s sensitivity and awareness to the many possibilities and potentials that the human form possesses. Students draw directly from both male and female models. Work is done in such media as charcoal, ink, pencil, and conti-crayon, as well as in techniques of contour, line, and work drawings.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 211* - Studio in Sculpture


    This course develops the individual imaginative efforts of students working in the third dimension. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of materials, scale, means, and concept as related to the artist’s statement. Students may work in a variety of materials and techniques such as wood, stone, plaster, metal, wax, and clay.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 217*W - Arts of the Prehistory to the Renaissance


    This survey course examines the development of the visual arts from cave painting to the beginning of the modern era. It concentrates on the relationship between artistic expression and social and cultural forces.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category. Can fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 218*W - Renaissance to Modern Art


    This course provides a descriptive survey of painting, sculpture, decorative arts and architecture from the Renaissance to Modern Era. This course includes the development of Western styles as well as those of Africa, Asia, and South America. Slides and visual materials illustrate lectures and discussions. This course focuses on the relationship between artistic expression and societal and cultural forces during this time period.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 219*W - American Art 1700-1900


    This course is a survey of painting, architecture, and sculpture from the early Colonial Period to the turn of the Twentieth Century. It emphasizes the meaning and function of art in the historic and cultural context of the developing nation.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category. May fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 221*W - Women Artists in History


    This course examines the achievements and contributions of European and American women artists from the middle ages to the present in terms of the culture in which they lived and worked.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category. May fulfill WAC requirement.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 222 - Asian Arts and Culture


    This course provides a survey of the arts of Asia, specifically India, China, and Japan from prehistory to modern times. Lectures and discussions focus on the traditional arts of painting, sculpture, and architecture, as well as the art of Feng Shui, Ikebana, Calligraphy, Haiku, Bonsai, Raku, and martial arts. Students have an opportunity to work directly with some of the art forms. Students are exposed to the aesthetics as well as the philosophical basis of these Eastern Arts.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ARTS 223* - Studio in Ceramics


    This course is an introduction to the various methods of pottery making. Students explore such forming methods as slab, pinch, coil, and throwing. The uses of glazing and kiln firing as a means for enhancing the design of both the pottery form and its function are developed. Tests are conducted in differing clay bodies and glaze information.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 228* - Three-Dimensional Design


    This course explores our urban environment as three-dimensional design. Students are encouraged to use the urban community as a classroom for studying the aesthetic interrelationships of man and his environment. Such basic design elements as color, form, shape, texture, and scale as related to the human elements are emphasized.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 231 - 3-D Animation


    This course is designed for individuals who are interested in developing expertise in 3-D computer animation. 3-D animation theory and practice are integrated using the latest computer programs. Animation composition and the creation of storyboards are taught in addition, as a variety of graphic and digital video tools are explored. Skills in lighting, vector layout, and animation rendering are emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ARTS 103.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ARTS 245* - Contemporary Jewish Art


    This course is an overview of the lives and works of Jewish visual artists from the mid-nineteenth century to today. The effects of anti-Semitism on the themes and acceptance of Jewish artists is addressed. In addition to a didactic approach, a component of this course explores the styles and media of these artists. Artistic skill is not required, only a willingness for students to explore their creativity.

    Fulfills social justice General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 248 - Interarts Workshop


    This course trains musicians, singers, dancers, painters, sculptors, actors, designers, and graphic artists to function as a collective in the preparation and mounting of a major stage production in an apprentice-like manner by contract with faculty coaches/directors.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Auditions, interviews, and permission of the company directors.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ARTS 255 - Introduction to Art Education


    This course explores the stages of a child’s development through art and how to teach developmentally-appropriate creative art activities in elementary, middle, and high schools. Students participate in art exercises and are required to design and critique lesson plans. Art teaching that emphasizes current research in art education is a major focus.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ARTS 260 - Advanced Studio in Computer Graphics


    This advanced studio provides the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth study of a specific media or art form. Students work out the studio experience in consultation with the instructor of the course, based on their individual interests and potential.

    May be repeated for a total of up to 6 credits.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    Credits: 2-6 s.h

  
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    ARTS 261 - Advanced Studio in Drawing


    This advanced studio provides the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth study of a specific media or art form. Students work out the studio experience in consultation with the instructor of the course, based on their individual interests and potential.

    May be repeated for a total of up to 6 credits.

    Credits: 2 s.h.

  
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    ARTS 262 - Advanced Studio in Painting


    This advanced studio provides the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth study of a specific media or art form. Students work out the studio experience in consultation with the instructor of the course, based on their individual interests and potential.

    May be repeated for a total of up to 6 credits.

    Credits: 2 s.h.

  
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    ARTS 263 - Advanced Studio in Design-Portfolio Presentation


    Advanced Studio in Design - Portfolio Preparation

    Credits: 3
  
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    ARTS 264 - Advanced Studio in Photography


    This advanced studio provides the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth study of a specific media or art form. Students work out the studio experience in consultation with the instructor of the course, based on their individual interests and potential.

    May be repeated for a total of up to 6 credits.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 2 s.h.

  
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    ARTS 265 - Advanced Studio in Printmaking


    This advanced studio provides the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth study of a specific media or art form. Students work out the studio experience in consultation with the instructor of the course, based on their individual interests and potential.

    May be repeated for a total of up to 6 credits.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 2 s.h.

  
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    ARTS 266 - Advanced Studio in Sculpture


    This advanced studio provides the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth study of a specific media or art form. Students work out the studio experience in consultation with the instructor of the course, based on their individual interests and potential.

    May be repeated for a total of up to 6 credits.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Persmission of Instructor

    Credits: 2 s.h.

  
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    ARTS 267 - Advanced Studio in Materials and Techniques


    This advanced studio provides the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth study of a specific media or art form. Students work out the studio experience in consultation with the instructor of the course, based on their individual interests and potential.

    May be repeated for a total of up to 6 credits.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of Instructor

    Credits: 2 s.h.

  
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    ARTS 270 - Advanced Studio in Ceramics


    This is a Clay course designed to incorporate sculptural ceramics and functional ceramics. The course includes the use of the potter’s wheel as a method of producing functional as well as sculptural objects. Students experiment with various materials and building techniques integrating a multicultural view in conjunction with assigned projects. the class structure incorporates lecture, video, and slide presentation demonstrations.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ARTS 280* - Integrating Arts in the Classroom


    The focus of this course is to train students in the basics of integrating visual arts in the curriculum. In order to create a framework for this to occur students need to be familiar with several aspects of art education. Students learn the stages of art development, goals and benefits, interdisciplinary connections, cross-cultural art and art as a tool for social justice. Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 324 - Care and Protection of Art Objects


    This course emphasizes the materials and techniques of an artist. Students make in-depth studies of the materials and methods that will afford them the opportunity to gain the greatest possible control over their creative process. Areas of investigation include paint pigments, chemistry of materials, and conservation of pictures.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    ARTS 386 - Supervised Field Experience


    This course provides the opportunity for the student to become involved in the urban community as an artist in residence. The student works directly with the people of the inner city in less formal situations such as a studio, gallery, museum, or a store-front workshop. An exhibit of students’ artwork in their own areas of interest is presented at the completion of the experience. This field experience requires a minimum of 450 clock hours of placement time. A minimum of 10 semester hours is required for graduation.

    Credits: 2-10 s.h

Art Education

  
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    ARTS 225* - Studio in Photography


    This course explores the photographic process, the use of equipment, film development, and printing. Emphasis is placed upon the use of the camera as a creative means of expression.

    Fulfills VAPA General Education category.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ARTS 382W - Seminar in Teaching Art


    This seminar focuses on the analysis of students’ ongoing demonstration of the knowledge, skills, and methodology acquired in field experiences and the exploration of selected issues in art education directed toward the student’s specific needs and interests. Students engage in learning experiences that demonstrate the design implementation and critique of art evaluation methods. State and National guidelines for art competencies will be reviewed.

    Can fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ATPY 105 - Methods and Materials of Art Therapy and CMO Art Education for Adolescents and Adults


    This course covers the range of materials, methods, and techniques employed by the art therapist and art educator. The course focuses on art therapy/art education with special needs adolescents and adults.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATPY 309W - Pre-Practicum in Art Therapy and Art Education


    This required course is designed for students in the art therapy concentration who need firsthand experience in the field. It includes on-site observation of an art therapist working with clients, peer supervision, and supervision by the clinical instructor of the class, as well as role-play, discussion, and lectures.

    Fulfills WAC requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATPY 101. This course can be waived for EDUC 318.

    Credits: 1-3 s.h


Art Therapy

  
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    ATPY 101 - Introduction to Art Therapy


    This course introduces students to the profession of art therapy, including its history and development. Therapeutic and diagnostic methods used in working with physically, emotionally, and socially disabled individuals are studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSYC 101.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATPY 203W - Art Therapy with Special Needs Populations


    This course is designed for individuals who are interested in working with multi-diagnosed individuals through art therapy. Various therapeutic approaches in art therapy as well as psychological and educational aspects of providing services to special needs populations are discussed. Students discover how art therapy can be used as an educational tool as well as a therapeutic modality.

    Can fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
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    ATPY 308 - Art Therapy and the Elderly Client


    This course presents art therapy as a tool to work with the physical, psychological, and social needs of the elderly. It focuses on materials and methodologies that the art therapist uses to assist the elderly to express these needs nonverbally through the art process.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    ATPY 407 - Psychology of Art and Artists


    This course integrates concepts and theories of art education, art therapy, and art      
    history. Students learn the parameters and potential fusion of these disciplines.      
    Discussions of the analysis of art by nineteenth and twentieth century artists who
    experienced psychological problems, as well as the utilization of art history in        
    therapeutic practice with clientele, are the essence of the course.                      

    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
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    ATPY 410 - The Therapeutic Aspects of Clay


    This course demonstrates techniques and tools to utilize clay as a therapeutic medium. It introduces methods and theories of art therapy utilizing clay as a tool for healing. Technical and theoretical information is covered in depth, along with the integration of clay as a vehicle to express social and political concerns.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATPY 482 - Art Therapy Seminar


    This seminar integrates topics in art therapy applicable to entry-level work in the field. Topics include multicultural aspects of art therapy, assessment and evaluation, aesthetics, new techniques, introduction to research and tools for obtaining a job.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATPY 484 - Practicum in Art Therapy


    This course provides students with an in-depth practicum experience in the art therapy field. Students practice observation skills, co-lead groups, and work with individual clients in agencies, schools, clinics, and other human service organizations. Students receive supervision from the College supervisor in-group and individual sessions. Depending on the site, students may utilize various approaches such as art as healing, art as adjunctive therapy, or a traditional art therapy approach.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATPY 309

    Credits: 1-8 s.h

Athletic Training

  
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    ATRN 110 - Introduction to Athletic Training


    This introductory course in athletic training is designed for athletic training majors and those considering athletic training as a career. It exposes students to the professional preparation of athletic trainers and their role as a health care professional at all levels. It also provides an introduction to the Springfield College Athletic Training Program.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ATRN 114 - Prevention of Athletic Injuries


    This course is designed to provide the student with a base of knowledge related to the prevention of athletic injuries. Topics include epidemiology of athletic injuries, preparticipation screening, basic conditioning and strength training, environmental conditions, protective devices, and nutritional aspects of health and performance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Students in the athletic training degree program or permission of instructor and ATRN 110.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATRN 227 - Assessment, Evaluation and Management of Injuries to the Hip, Pelvis, and Lower Extremities


    The course is divided into two parts. 1) Discussion of the Principles of Athletic Injury Assessment/Evaluation and Classification and 2) Application Assessment/Evaluation and Classification Principles to injuries involving the hip, pelvis and lower extremity.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 114 and ESMS 115 and Athletic Training Majors only.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ATRN 228 - Assessment, Evaluation and Management of Injuries to the Head and Upper Extremities


    Course emphasis the application of Assessment/Evaluation and Classification Principles to injuries involving the head, face and upper extremity.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 227 and Athletic Training Majors Only.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATRN 284 - Sophomore Practicum in Athletic Training I


    This fall, sophomore-year athletic training clinical experience emphasizes the development of entry-level competence in athletic injury prevention, evaluation, and management. The students develop these competencies working with college and secondary school athletes under the supervision of certified athletic trainers.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Athletic training major, ATRN 112, and current CPR/FA certification.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ATRN 285 - Sophomore Practicum in Athletic Training II


    This spring, sophomore-year athletic training clinical experience emphasizes continued development of entry-level competence in athletic injury prevention, evaluation, and management. The students develop these competencies working with college and secondary school athletes under the supervision of certified athletic trainers.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Athletic training major, ATRN 225, 284, and current CPR/FA certification.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    ATRN 305W - Athletic Injury Rehabilitation and Therapeutic Exercise


    This course introduces the athletic training student to athletic injury rehabilitation. It includes assessment skills, treatment goal development, and documentation techniques. The use of therapeutic exercise in injury rehabilitation is emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 226 and enrollment in the athletic training major. (Non-majors need permission of the instructor.) Can fulfill WAC.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATRN 307 - Athletic Injury Rehabilitation and Therapeutic Modalities


    This course extends the discussion of athletic injury rehabilitation from therapeutic exercise (ATRN 305) to therapeutic modalities. Emphasis is on rehabilitation program development, integrating therapeutic exercise, and modalities in the treatment of athletic injuries.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 305 and enrollment in the athletic training major. (Non-majors need permission of the instructor.)

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATRN 320 - Pathology and Athletic Training


    The course for third year athletic training majors introduces students to entry-level knowledge and skills relating to pathology, general medical and non-orthopedic conditions the entry-level athletic trainer must possess. The course takes a system-based approach including the integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and neurological systems. The course also includes units on Pharmacology and Radiology in the treatment of disease and activity related problems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 305. Athletic Training majors only.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATRN 384 - Junior Practicum in Athletic Training I


    This fall, junior-year athletic training clinical experience provides athletic training students the opportunity to further develop their practical skills in athletic injury prevention and management. Students are assigned to clinical instructors, licensed and certified athletic trainers, either on- or off-campus to gain experience working with an athletic team.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 226, 285, and current CPR/FA certification.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    ATRN 385 - Junior Practicum in Athletic Training II


    This spring, junior-year athletic training clinical experience provides athletic training students the opportunity to further develop their practical skills and competencies in athletic injury prevention and management. Students are assigned to clinical instructors, licensed and certified athletic trainers, either on- or off-campus to gain experience working with an athletic team.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 226, 384, and current CPR/FA certification.

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
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    ATRN 410 - Administration and Education in Athletic Training


    This course examines the responsibilities of the athletic trainer as an educator and administrator. Students investigate the evolving role of athletic training in the United States Health Care system. Administration topics will include, principles of management, administration, budgeting, staffing and supervision. In education, students review concepts of learning styles, instructional strategies, and basic research methodology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    athletic training major, ATRN 384, and 307.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
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    ATRN 482 - Senior Seminar in Athletic Training


    This is a seminar for seniors in the athletic training program. Topics include low-back injuries, massage, dermatological care, musculoskeletal examination, pharmacology, ankle injuries, and sports epidemiology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 385, and 307. (Non-majors need permission of the instructor.)

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ATRN 484W - Senior Fieldwork in Athletic Training-Clinical Fieldwork Sport Component


    The senior-year fieldwork experience will continue to emphasize competency development in all areas of injury prevention, and management of athletic injuries. Clinical settings include team responsibilities either on or off the Springfield College campus.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior level ATRN Major, Current CPR/FA). All clinical education experiences will take place under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
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    ATRN 485W - Senior Fieldwork in Athletic Training-Clinical Fieldwork Athletic Injury Rehabilitation Component


    This senior-year fieldwork experience continues to emphasize competency development in athletic injury rehabilitation techniques. Students are expected to complete clinical rotations in athletic training injury rehabilitation, surgical observation, general medical and other health care settings, under the supervision of an Approved Clinical Instructor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior level ATRN Major, Current CPR/FA).

    Credits: 2 s.h
  
  •  

    ATRN 487 - Internship in Sports Injury Management


    This internship, for eligible senior athletic training majors, is designed to expand the student’s sport injury clinical experiences outside of the traditional high school and college/university training room setting. Students can complete internships at sports medicine rehabilitation facilities, physical fitness facilities, professional teams, etc.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ATRN 307 and 486.

    Credits: 5-15 s.h

Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 101* - Basic Concepts of Modern Biology


    This course emphasizes the interrelationships of life as demonstrated in the following major areas of biological study environmental science, evolution and the origin of life, basic physiological procedures, behavior, genetics, and development. Human biology and the social implications of modern biology are considered throughout.

    General Education category natural science.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must also register for the corresponding lab, BIOL 102.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
  •  

    BIOL 102* - Basic Concepts Laboratory


    This laboratory/field course illustrates the principles and applications of modern biology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must register for BIOL 101 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 121* - Bioscience I


    The scope of this course encompasses all of the major themes unifying the diverse avenues of biological science. These core themes include the molecular structure of matter and the cellular basis of life, the interaction of organisms with their environment, the correlation between structure and function at all levels of organization, and evolution as the driving force that unifies the countless forms of life, past and present.

    General Education category natural science.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    High school biology. Co-requisite: Students must also register for the corresponding lab, BIOL 123, unless previously taken.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
  •  

    BIOL 122 - Bioscience II


    Part II of BIOL 121. The scope of this course encompasses all of the major themes unifying the diverse avenues of biological science. These core themes include the molecular structure of matter and the cellular basis of life, the interaction of organisms with their environment, the correlation between structure and function at all levels of organization, and evolution as the driving force that unifies the countless forms of life, past and present.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121.Co-requisite:Students must also register for BIOL 124, unless previously taken.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 123* - Bioscience I Laboratory


    In this course, students perform hands-on laboratory exercises that illustrate important biological concepts. Exercises include biochemical assays, gel electrophoresis, chromatography, dissection, and microscopic examination of specimens.

    Fulfills Natural Science General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must register for BIOL 121 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h

  
  •  

    BIOL 124 - Bioscience II Laboratory


    In this course, students perform hands-on laboratory exercises that illustrate important biological concepts. Exercises include biochemical assays, gel electrophoresis, chromatography, dissection, and microscopic examination of specimens.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must register for BIOL 122 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 130* - Anatomy and Physiology I


    This course analyzes the structure and function of cells, tissue, and organ systems. Focus is placed on the muscular, skeletal, and circulatory systems as they relate to human movement and homeostasis.

    General Education category natural science.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must also register for the corresponding lab, BIOL 132.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
  •  

    BIOL 131* - Anatomy and Physiology II


    This course covers the structure, function, physiology, and biochemistry of the lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, and nervous systems. Topics covered include nutrition, disease, reproduction, sexually transmitted disease, exercise, and the use of drugs, including prescribed medicines.

    General Education category natural science.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must also register for the corresponding lab, BIOL 133.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
  •  

    BIOL 132* - Anatomy and Physiology I Lab


    This laboratory course includes anatomical and histological studies, regional dissection of preserved pigs, experiments and demonstrations of principles underlying physiological processes, and extensive use of multimedia computer applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must also register for BIOL 130 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 133* - Anatomy and Physiology II Lab


    This laboratory course includes anatomical and histological studies, regional dissection of preserved pigs, experiments and demonstrations of principles underlying physiological processes, and extensive use of multimedia computer applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must also register for BIOL 131 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 214 - Introduction to Medical Microbiology


    The objectives of this course are to examine the structure and function of microbial human pathogens and to study their relationship to infection and disease in a lecture and laboratory format. The dynamic mechanisms of host-parasite interactions are emphasized. Special consideration is given to the problems of host-microbe association in immunosuppressed or immunocompromised patients. The actions and the selectivity of antibiotics in terms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular characteristics and the potential dangers associated with their widespread use and abuse are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121-122 and 123-124, CHEM 121-122 and 123-124.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 230W - Animal Biology


    Lectures and videos give students an understanding and appreciation of selected 
    aspects of the biology of vertebrates and invertebrates. Students learn about        
    animal migrations, reproduction, courtship behavior, foraging and predation.

    Fulfills WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121-122 and 123-124, or BIOL 101-102.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
  •  

    BIOL 241 - Developmental Biology


    The maturation of organisms from conception to adulthood is explained in this course.  Students learn the interactions and changes that occur between the one cell stage and the mature organism.  Comparisons between the development of model organisms and humans are discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121-123 and 122-124 and CHEM 121-123 and 122-124; Corequsite: Students must register for BIOL 242.

    Credits: 3 s.h.
  
  •  

    BIOL 242 - Developmental Biology Laboratory


    The maturation of organisms from conception to adulthood is revealed in this course.  Students examine the development of model organisms, from fertilization through the embryotic stages, and observe regenerative processes.  

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: Students must register for BIOL 241.

    Credits: 1 s.h.

  
  •  

    BIOL 250 - Human Structure and Function I


    This course covers human physiology and functional anatomy for students in biological sciences and allied health majors. Emphasis is placed on physiological, cellular, and molecular processes. Students develop an appreciation of the process of scientific discovery and critical thinking, particularly as it relates to medicine and therapeutic disciplines.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121-122 and 123-124, CHEM 121-122 and 123-124. Co-requisite: Students must also register for the corresponding lab, BIOL 252 unless previously taken.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 251 - Human Structure and Function II


    Part II of BIOL 250. This course covers human physiology and functional anatomy for students in biological sciences and allied health majors. Emphasis is placed on physiological, cellular, and molecular processes. Students develop an appreciation of the process of scientific discovery and critical thinking, particularly as it relates to medicine and therapeutic disciplines.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 250. Co-requisite: Students must also register for BIOL 253 unless previously taken.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 252 - Human Structure and Function I Laboratory


    This laboratory course includes anatomical and histological studies, regional dissection of preserved cats, experiments and demonstrations of principles underlying physiological processes, and extensive use of multimedia computer applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121-122 and 123-124, CHEM 121-122 and 123-124. Co-requisite: Students must also register for BIOL 250 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 253 - Human Structure and Function II Laboratory


    Part II of BIOL 252. This laboratory course includes anatomical and histological studies, regional dissection of preserved cats, experiments and demonstrations of principles underlying physiological processes, and extensive use of multimedia computer applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must also register for BIOL 251 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 260*W - General Ecology


    This course studies the structural and functional aspects of ecosystems covering food chains, material cycling, limiting factors, populations, interactions, adaptations, succession, diversity, and world biomes. Fieldwork and competency in techniques for ecosystems analysis are stressed. WAC requirement includes keeping a log and field reports examined by the instructor and the writing center. As a social justice course, environmental issues relating to economic class, gender, religion, race, and ability are examined. Time is allocated for connecting social justice to ecological concepts.

    Fulfills social justice General Education category. Can fulfill WAC.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 101-102 or 121-122 and 123-124. Co-requisite: Students must also register for the corresponding lab, BIOL 261.

    Credits: 3 s.h

  
  •  

    BIOL 261 - General Ecology Laboratory


    This hands-on, lab/field course develops comfort and competency in currently acceptable methods of environmental analysis and the applications of ecological principles in real-life situations, occasionally with experts in various fields. This course is primarily field trip oriented.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Co-requisite: Students must also register for BIOL 260 or permission of Instructor.

    Credits: 1 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 264 - Flora of New England


    This course involves field recognition, ecology, and use of major non-flowering and flowering plants. Identification is accomplished by a study of flowers, fruits, seeds, leaves, and winter twigs. Activities include field trip studies of major plant associations (bogs, marshes, swamps, fields, forests). Applications for teaching and environmental studies, collecting, preserving, and herbarium techniques are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121-122 and 123-124, or BIOL 101-102. Co-requisite: Students must also register for the corresponding lab, BIOL 266.

    Credits: 3 s.h
  
  •  

    BIOL 265 - Introductory Horticulture


    This course studies plant function, growth, and maintenance that includes seed starting, transplanting, propagation by cuttings and layering, grafting, pruning, plant breeding, bulb handling, and recognition of basic plant disorders. Greenhouse and outdoor gardening principles as well as education and therapeutic applicants are studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIOL 121-122 and 123-124, or BIOL 101-102. Co-requisite: Students must also register for the corresponding lab, BIOL 267.

    Credits: 3 s.h
 

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